New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 158 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Van Lear Rose
Lowest review score: 10 18
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 96 out of 158
  2. Negative: 22 out of 158
158 music reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    On their astonishing new Stankonia (LaFace/Arista), Outkast explore their own disappointment with hip-hop's self-satisfied acquisitiveness. But though it attacks the genre's tunnel vision, the album -- which takes its name from George Clinton's vision of funk as expressing the raw, unruly side of life -- does so with joy (and huge doses of absurdity) instead of with the polemics of Public Enemy.... Stankonia is among the most exciting albums of the year, not only because it brazenly addresses hip-hop's spiritual emptiness (other well-intentioned rappers have tried) but because it musically surpasses the most innovative work of street production dons like Swizz Beatz, Manny Fresh, and Timbaland. By offering something for both the mind and the ass, to borrow from George Clinton's slogan, Outkast, like Gang of Four and Funkadelic before them, make revolution you can dance to.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A darkly compelling masterpiece that taps into the pitch-black id of Johnny Cash’s best records.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Here, Nas is so fierce, so plainspoken, so lean with words, that he demolishes not just the oeuvre of our ruling rappers (yes, including Eminem's) and recalls the music's lyrical champs like Rakim, he even brings to mind hip-hop progenitors like Muhammad Ali in the "Rumble in the Jungle" era.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Musicology is a thrilling, electric statement by an artist who just might be building toward another creative peak.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is stranger, thornier, and meaner than anything in the band’s past.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Love and Theft" showcases the gloriously sloppy spontaneity he's displayed onstage but only rarely captured on record.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the heaviest rock albums since Seattle's heyday.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What's most exciting about Miss E is its sense of playfulness: It's the rare hip-hop album in which unabashed joy -- rather than acquisitiveness or grimacing gangsterism -- is the main ingredient.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Not content to embrace familiar dance-music genres like trance (the way Madonna does when she's feeling experimental), the band delves into the most outré electronic music imaginable, from the amniotic soundscapes of Brian Eno to the industrial gristle of Coil. The result is Radiohead's best album...
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her new album, Vespertine, is the singer's most complete and compelling expression of that wondrous worldview yet.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hail to the Thief is overloaded with miraculous sounds.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    How the West Was Won proves that Led Zeppelin was nearly peerless in creating gigantic, thunderous rock.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bubblegum is a blues record, a powerfully original reinterpretation of the genre.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Skinner’s finely honed sense of place still has a nearly hypnotic effect.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Especially when heard on headphones, Medulla is an overwhelming sonic bliss-out, Phil Spector’s wall of sound channeled through the voice box.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A profoundly emotional, uncynical brand of songwriting that showcases Antony’s obsession with nature.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The best record of his career, a collision of the idiosyncratic charms of Portastatic with the exuberant rock power of Superchunk.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Broken Social Scene has pulled off the rare feat of making a heavily produced record sound instinctive and spontaneous.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A deeply satisfying work of storytelling through pop.... What Are You On? is emotionally complex in a way that few of the more prosperous songwriters of Cornog’s generation are capable of producing at this point in their careers.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Dirt Farmer is an iconic album, this year’s "Time Out of Mind" or "Freedom." Just give him a Grammy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is pure non-homogenised, heart-on-sleeve, downright meaningful music, the sort of thing The Wombats cry themselves to sleep over on a nightly basis. For that alone it’s worth a tenner of anybody’s money.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    American Supreme proves that Suicide can reach backward and still remain ahead of the pack.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Parton's risks here bring great, unexpected pleasures.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's full of anthemic songs with echoing guitar, catchy choruses, and the kind of spacious production Daniel Lanois and Brian Eno also brought to The Joshua Tree.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band take their experimental ethos even further without sacrificing the emotional power of their debut.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album feels like a romp, with Thompson performing everything from delicate waltzes to roadhouse rock.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Strange and wonderful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Rooty, Basement Jaxx refines the ambitious but untidy sprawl of its debut into a carnivalesque mix of two-step, house, funk, and disco with a modern take on George Clinton's late-seventies mission of "rescuing dance music from the blahs."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike her recent work, Stumble Into Grace is made up solely of Harris’s work--love songs like “Can You Hear Me Now” that perfectly suit her voice, which is sweet and whispery yet never sentimental.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By leaving her images blurry and her singing uncomplicated, Williams has found a way to capture the sound she hears in her head and obsesses over the recording process to find.