New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 2,272 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Listen to Me Marlon
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede (First Sequence)
Score distribution:
2272 movie reviews
  1. This demonic possession story is at times so lame it makes the last "Paranormal Activity" flick look like a masterpiece.
  2. Began life as a standard sci-fi horror script before mutating into the unfunny mess it now is.
  3. The visuals in the final battle have some charm: They reminded me of early Tsui Hark Hong Kong extravaganzas like Zu: Warriors of the Magic Mountain and A Chinese Ghost Story (which he produced). But there was passion in those HK pictures, along with acrobatic wire-work. Promiscuous CGI makes even the miraculous seem ho-hum.
  4. Bana is a likable actor, but he doesn’t bring any vulnerability or transparency to the part; it’s hard to tell what he’s thinking, if he’s thinking anything at all. And so, we move from one bleak, bludgeoning setpiece to another. But with each loud noise, the film loses us more and more.
  5. Klaatu is a dream role for the beautifully blank Reeves, since he doesn’t even have to pretend to emote.
  6. Butter essentially eats its own premise, then proceeds to bludgeon us with unfunny, unoriginal political satire.
  7. It should be wilder, funnier, nuttier.
  8. It isn’t a train wreck--a train wreck would be memorable. What’s wrong is wrong by design.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Wealth does not confer decency and should not excuse noxious behavior, and it is not a replacement for a soul. But it is, apparently, the final answer to the question in the movie's title.
  9. If all this sounds outrageous, and extreme … don’t worry, it’s not. Provocation coupled with ineptitude doesn’t reveal the ugliness of humanity; it simply reveals the ugliness of the filmmakers themselves.
  10. My daughter wants you to know that the movie is great and that you shouldn’t listen to a hater like me. I envy her belief.
  11. From the look of this film, its prime appreciators will be heavy-metal futurist dweebs.
  12. It doesn’t jell, though, and the movie’s philosophical message is especially grating.
  13. In a vile-movie competition between Michael Haneke’s "Funny Games" and Vadim Perelman’s The Life Before Her Eyes, Haneke’s film would win--but only because he’s working so much harder to be noxious.
  14. It’s just plain offensive — and not all that well made, either. No Escape takes the casual xenophobia of something like Taken, crossbreeds it with something altogether more noxious, then asks us to kick back and enjoy the ride. We don’t. We can’t. And the ride isn’t that great to begin with.
  15. If the movie didn't pander so madly to the audience for "Sex and the City" and "Legally Blonde," it might have been a comedy touchstone instead of a cringeworthy footnote.
  16. You would have to have been born yesterday to miss the switcheroos and reeking red herrings planted in this pulp.
  17. There are a bunch of other clunky immigrant subplots (the Jews get a comic one, the Turks a scary one), but it isn't until the massacre–cum–civics tutorial in the liquor store that Crossing Over crosses into the mythic realm of camp. What a waste. I still say it's better than "Crash," though.
  18. The movie, written and directed by Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal, is desultory when it's not inept, but the set-up is so good that you can't help sticking it out to the (unforgivable) end.
  19. It’s all so glancing and superficial that the movie doesn’t seem to have a present tense. It goes by like coming attractions. It is, however, a treasury of bad biopic dialogue.
  20. A tired, unscary, incoherent mess.
  21. Whatever its politics, Gimme Shelter fails on multiple levels.
  22. Appalling in ways that you could never have anticipated. The movie mixes mismatched-buddy high jinks with scenes of carnage.
  23. Familiarity is not always a bad thing, though. "The Conjuring" breathed new life into old clichés; it showed that those creaking doors and possessed closets and white-robed figures still had the power to scare us. But that was a movie made with sensitivity and purpose. The blunt, lifeless Annabelle, on the other hand, sucks that life right back out.
  24. When Lee isn't doing cinematic somersaults or mining for injustice, he doesn't seem to know where to put the camera. The logistics of the plot make no sense, and he has nothing to sell but the theme of our common humanity--in which, on the evidence, I don't think he believes.
  25. You’re left with no real catharsis — religious or emotional. And without that, Captive winds up building to a big nothing.
  26. In my own world, Only God Forgives plays somewhat differently. I thought it was just about the worst f---ing thing I’ve ever seen. In fact, I was depressed it wasn’t laughed off the screen.
  27. Orgy, hell: The film is like a nightmare in which you're trapped in an arcade with screens on all sides and no eyelids. Based on an elemental but happily streamlined Japanese cartoon (an anime precursor), it's an eyesore, a shambles, with incoherent action and ear-buckling dialogue.
  28. In Arthur, the spectacularly grating remake of Steve Gordon's 1981 P. G. Wodehouse simulation (this time, Peter Baynham miswrote, Jason Winer misdirected), Russell Brand gives a career-killing performance.
  29. The Canyons isn’t just bad, it’s rank — and it takes a peculiar sort of integrity to denude the frame of life to the point where it smells to heaven.

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