New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 158 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Van Lear Rose
Lowest review score: 10 Crown Royal
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 96 out of 158
  2. Negative: 22 out of 158
158 music reviews
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A darkly compelling masterpiece that taps into the pitch-black id of Johnny Cash’s best records.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    How the West Was Won proves that Led Zeppelin was nearly peerless in creating gigantic, thunderous rock.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    On their astonishing new Stankonia (LaFace/Arista), Outkast explore their own disappointment with hip-hop's self-satisfied acquisitiveness. But though it attacks the genre's tunnel vision, the album -- which takes its name from George Clinton's vision of funk as expressing the raw, unruly side of life -- does so with joy (and huge doses of absurdity) instead of with the polemics of Public Enemy.... Stankonia is among the most exciting albums of the year, not only because it brazenly addresses hip-hop's spiritual emptiness (other well-intentioned rappers have tried) but because it musically surpasses the most innovative work of street production dons like Swizz Beatz, Manny Fresh, and Timbaland. By offering something for both the mind and the ass, to borrow from George Clinton's slogan, Outkast, like Gang of Four and Funkadelic before them, make revolution you can dance to.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Love and Theft" showcases the gloriously sloppy spontaneity he's displayed onstage but only rarely captured on record.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is stranger, thornier, and meaner than anything in the band’s past.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Speakerboxxx--by itself the album of the year--makes the failings of The Love Below all the more evident.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Skinner’s finely honed sense of place still has a nearly hypnotic effect.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What's most exciting about Miss E is its sense of playfulness: It's the rare hip-hop album in which unabashed joy -- rather than acquisitiveness or grimacing gangsterism -- is the main ingredient.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the heaviest rock albums since Seattle's heyday.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The whole record is about the band skillfully weaving in and out of dramatically different textures and arrangements; each song plays with several musical ideas, not just one or two.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her new album, Vespertine, is the singer's most complete and compelling expression of that wondrous worldview yet.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A profoundly emotional, uncynical brand of songwriting that showcases Antony’s obsession with nature.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A sprawling and undisciplined mess... but it’s fully attuned to what made West so compelling in the first place, namely chunks of samples that feel raw and convey an underdog sensibility.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Showtime, Dizzee doesn’t give up his sonic adventurousness, but he is a lot more disciplined about it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike her recent work, Stumble Into Grace is made up solely of Harris’s work--love songs like “Can You Hear Me Now” that perfectly suit her voice, which is sweet and whispery yet never sentimental.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hail to the Thief is overloaded with miraculous sounds.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There is nothing tentative or unpolished about any of these songs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bubblegum is a blues record, a powerfully original reinterpretation of the genre.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When you’re treated to such a powerful front woman, it seems almost unfair to complain about the lack of sophisticated sonics.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Especially when heard on headphones, Medulla is an overwhelming sonic bliss-out, Phil Spector’s wall of sound channeled through the voice box.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Each and every hand clap and piano chord on their foot-stomping, flawless new album, now streaming on their label's Website, is obsessively placed.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Underneath all of those lush, gorgeous strings, [producer] Hogarth then layered the electronic beats, delays, fades, and distortions that lend the album its freshness and vitality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The best record of his career, a collision of the idiosyncratic charms of Portastatic with the exuberant rock power of Superchunk.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Once in a Lifetime shies away from the Talking Heads’ life force. It presents them as winking ironists, not the true black-music believers that they were.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Badu has rejected the role of soul princess and chosen instead to embrace a raw, unhinged spirituality that separates her from the pack.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Broken Social Scene has pulled off the rare feat of making a heavily produced record sound instinctive and spontaneous.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His solo debut, Stephen Malkmus, doesn't sound so different from late-period Pavement, but at least he's regained his smart-ass swagger.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Springsteen refuses to allow himself either vengefulness or excessive pride, and he avoids too-literal musings on the tragedy that ultimately undermined songs like Neil Young's "Let's Roll."
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Q-Tip's flow on his new disc remains mellow, freewheeling, and vaguely inspirational. But it doesn't feel relevant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Rooty, Basement Jaxx refines the ambitious but untidy sprawl of its debut into a carnivalesque mix of two-step, house, funk, and disco with a modern take on George Clinton's late-seventies mission of "rescuing dance music from the blahs."