New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 360 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Six by Sondheim
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 186
  2. Negative: 0 out of 186
186 tv reviews
  1. The show's antic energy and aggressively kooky heroine may not hit everyone's sweet spot, but the pilot is a brisk, confident piece of work, made by people with a clear vision.
  2. I did love Mildred Pierce, mostly, for much of its nearly six hours.
  3. An unsteady but very likable debut. ... That's about as good as anyone can expect from a talk show that debuted on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and that's going to spend the next few weeks or months perfecting itself while shouldering the burden of immense and mostly unreasonable expectations.
  4. I suppose some of it is funny, as in a Kafka/Beckett/Pinter soft-shoe shuffle of grotesques. Still, what’s so far much more mesmerizing about The Riches is class war and caste hate.
  5. It's magisterially trashy: sweet, glorious madness.
  6. The characters on GGTD are, for the most part, pretty smart, and their frustrations are well articulated and vivid. Divorce, I'm told, involves anger, distress, self-recrimination, and a not insignificant amount of genuine grief. That's the part the show seems to nail. Everything else, though, has been done better elsewhere.
  7. Not so funny but genuinely touching.
  8. Despite very slight improvements, this series still seems deluded as to what it is and blind to what it could become.
  9. The script and direction could both use a jolt of crazy energy of the sort that made Precious so thrilling (or, if you didn’t like it, unbearable).
  10. It's grindhouse and art house, and it carries itself as if it doesn't give a damn what you think of it. And its infuriating push-pull quality is still fascinating.
  11. The Reformation is what this equally entertaining second season is about, plus ditching the brunette, Anne Boleyn (Natalie Dormer), in favor of the blonde, Jane Seymour (Anita Briem).
  12. The show is fast-paced and unpretentious, and it finds clever ways to deliver exposition that might otherwise be tedious.... [But] It often tries too hard to wow us, when it might have been better off just telling its story and developing its characters.
  13. Political comedies tend to work best when they're absurdist (like Duck Soup, or HBO's Veep) or much, much subtler (the gold standard being Tanner '88, a collaboration between Trudeau and Robert Altman). Alpha House falls somewhere in the middle and gets stranded there, though the company is so likable that it's a limbo you may not mind being stranded in.
  14. The lead performances are a tad opaque, and the script feels as though it's telling two separate stories that don't immediately seem as though they'll connect in a graceful way.
  15. Vegas isn't art and doesn't knock itself out pretending otherwise. But its no-fuss directness is appealing, and Quaid's ropy scowl keeps it centered.
  16. In the end, it turns out that Homeland Security so desperately needs Olivia on their side of the freak wars that they show her their top-secret Mulder-Scully-esque X-files and recruit both Bishops as her own mercenary team of pattern pods. And I am the queen of the Nile.
  17. A series whose undercurrent of fatalism might be unpleasant if the characters weren’t so corrosively funny.
  18. United States of Tara, a flawed but fascinating series about a women with Dissociative Identity Disorder.
  19. There are so many familiar ideas and stories in BMJ that it's easy to miss some of the show's more daring and interesting moments. Mercifully, though, they're in there.
  20. To be clear, the problem isn't that Will is in some general sense unlikable, it's that About a Boy rigs the show so that you have no choice but to think of him as a liberating life force who's adorable and ultimately admirable.
  21. It's possible The Big C will get better, even if (maybe especially if) Cathy never does. And if it takes two seasons to become a great sitcom about dying? That might be worth the wait.
  22. The series' bludgeoning aesthetic is silly, but it works. Much of History's programming aims to intrigue viewers who might never crack open a book, while assuring literate history buffs that the filmmakers know what they're talking about.
  23. When you’ve got Peter O’Toole in a Masterpiece Theatre mini-series, who cares how many liberties teleplaywright Russell T. Davies took with the confabulations of Giovanni Giacomo Casanova?
  24. We go on watching because of Keaton.... Otherwise, The Company is both surprisingly slow and remarkably tendentious.
  25. Ben and Kate is enjoyable enough if you don't mind a severe case of the cutes.
  26. State of Mind will be worth a careful watching as much for the writer as for the star.
  27. If the actors were stronger--or, to be fair, if the show had had a better sense of how to tap whatever talents they possess--they might have been able to sell the material. No such luck.
  28. The show's passionate aberrance can be charming and sweet, menacing and creepy, sometimes enchanting and sometimes deeply off-putting.
  29. It plays more like a lavishly funded Lifetime movie.
  30. In the not great but likable and intelligent Madam Secretary, Téa Leoni’s talent gets a deserving showcase.

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