New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,650 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 56 Up
Lowest review score: 0 InAPPropriate Comedy
Score distribution:
6,650 movie reviews
  1. At age 76, Loach also decided to offer his characters, and audience, some hope — at the bottom of a glass.
  2. Bhalla’s advocacy gets its force above all from the oddly similar personalities of the two main subjects — Wallace and Sumell — zealous reformers possessed of astonishing optimism, even as Bhalla closes by noting that there are 80,000 prisoners in solitary in the US.
  3. A dizzying lowlife saga that’s fast, smart, wicked, sort of ambitious and blazingly ironic. It’s as unpredictable as a Lindsay Lohan drive to the grocery store, as overstuffed as the pictures on Anthony Weiner’s Twitter feed and as hilarious as me on the bench press.
  4. One of the best films released so far this year, At Any Price signals the arrival of Iranian-American Ramin Bahrani in the ranks of major US directors.
  5. Mud
    Mud runs over two hours, climaxing with a shootout that belongs in a different movie. It’s a rare misstep in an art-house movie that will pull mainstream audiences along as inexorably as the Mississippi River. Go see it.
  6. Morales’ spin on the old ransom plot is fresher and more gripping than most big-budget Hollywood products.
  7. Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby is the first must-see film of Hollywood’s summer season, if for no other reason than its jaw-dropping evocation of Roaring ’20s New York — in 3-D, no less.
  8. Director Lenny Abrahamson’s latest film has its roots in the notorious death of a teenager outside a Dublin nightclub, later detailed in Kevin Power’s novel “Bad Day in Blackrock.” The pensive, gray-tinged What Richard Did unfolds this downbeat tale in long scenes, but seldom feels slow.
  9. The various witnesses tell contradictory tales that turn this into a real-life “Rashomon." The fact that two of the principals — Sarah and Michael, who delivers touching and eloquent on-camera narration that he wrote himself — are accomplished actors adds another level of confusion and interest that help make this compelling storytelling.
  10. Philippe Béziat’s documentary focuses on how Sivadier and his Violetta, the French soprano Natalie Dessay, fuse acting with the music. It’s an incredible view of artists at work.
  11. Pieta is one of Kim’s most complex and mature efforts, melding violence and humor into dark entertainment.
  12. The first filmed Shakespeare comedy in decades that’s actually funny.
  13. There is something both mischievous and moving about a world-famous director who, closing on his 10th decade, designs a movie that celebrates his actors: their varying ages, their versatility, their heart.
  14. In other words, this punkish, sleek film about beautiful kids wallowing in purloined Prada could have been written by a grumpy 65-year-old white guy in gabardine, provided he had a sense of irony. The Bling Ring is the bridge between Coppola and Bill O’Reilly.
  15. Thomas Vinterberg (“The Celebration”) directs with restraint that makes the story all the more affecting.
  16. Still Mine eschews schmaltz, and is tremendously moving.
  17. I’d like to see a sequel about her freshman year at college, please. There were still a few items on that list left unchecked.
  18. The friction between a couple of still-struggling artists sounds rather depressing, but in fact the film is often funny; it shows that love is present in even the couple’s harshest exchanges.
  19. Blue Caprice takes a minimalist, documentary-style approach that proves harrowingly effective.
  20. What makes the movie so delightful is that Wadjda isn’t trying to make trouble; she’s just being herself. A shot of the system of wire hangers attached to her radio so she can pick up Western music stations sums up her can-do attitude.
  21. Is torture ever justifiable? A twisty, compelling, brilliantly acted (if sometimes difficult to watch) thriller, Prisoners, asks this question not in the usual contemporary context — anti-terrorism — but instead as a gruesome option deployed as a response to every parent’s worst nightmare.
  22. It’s a remarkable story, vividly and urgently told by French-Canadian director Vallée (“The Young Victoria”) from a pointed, schmaltz-free script by Craig Borten and Melissa Wallack.
  23. There’s an exhilarating sadness to it all that amounts to cinematic poetry.
  24. A great big snowy pleasure with an emotionally gripping core, brilliant Broadway-style songs and a crafty plot.
  25. It only seems plotless. Momentous things happen, one of them tele­graphed in a single heartbreaking shot. The sense of time and place is so intense that Jules’ way of life seems to be disappearing even as we watch him.
  26. Nuclear Nation is likely to attract those who already oppose such power plants. But supporters should see it, too, if only to hear the opposition’s arguments. The film raises issues that aren’t going away.
  27. If The Past doesn’t equal the masterpiece that preceded it, it’s still an exceptional film from a man who is clearly one of the best working directors.
  28. Like Father, Like Son has earned its right to reduce a person to a sobbing wreck.
  29. A good documentary uses judicious editing to make an important addition to your knowledge of a subject, and Mitt does so in a big way.
  30. Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan are superb as the couple, who use the occasion to drop bombs on each other.

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