New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,932 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Russian Dolls
Lowest review score: 0 Tim and Eric's Billion Dollar Movie
Score distribution:
6,932 movie reviews
  1. You don't have to know Chile's bloody history to be moved by the poignant new film Machuca, the first movie made by a Chilean about the country's 1973 military coup.
  2. Like Roald Dahl's book, Tim Burton's splendidly imaginative and visually stunning - and often very dark and creepy - new version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is squarely aimed more at children than their parents.
  3. The film is less violent and bloody than much of the director's work, but the absurdity level is sky high. Takashi Miike is at the top of his game, loving every minute of his surreal visit to the twilight zone.
  4. Between D-Day, the sheer ambition of Paul Thomas Anderson's historical epic and Robert Elswit's dazzling cinematography, this is a must-see movie - even though its emotional temperature rarely rises above freezing and the climax goes way, way, way over the top.
  5. A grim, challenging movie that will amply reward audiences willing to go along with its ride into the dark depths of its characters' souls.
  6. Sweet without being sticky and funny without getting silly, Whip It introduces Barrymore as a director with a keen eye, a good ear for tone and an inspired touch with actors.
  7. After seeing Everybody's Fine, Paul McCartney offered to write a song that plays over the closing credits. That may be because the whole movie is like a celluloid McCartney tune: warm and playful and sweetly earnest, but lightly funny, too, and crafted with consummate skill.
  8. [McCarthy] marries beautifully spare compositions with comically abbreviated dialogue to craft something magnificent from a vaguely precious premise that could easily be the foundation for a parody.
  9. Like the paintings of the master, Renoir is beautiful to look at, but it would be a mistake to call the film (or its subject) shallow.
  10. The most devastating spoof of reality TV since Albert Brooks' 1978 "Real Life."
    • New York Post
  11. Walken was largely typecast in quirky roles as a result of playing the title character's brother in "Annie Hall," so it's something of a delightful irony that 35 years later, Walken finds his most rewarding role leading a terrific ensemble in what amounts to one of the best Woody Allen movies that Allen wasn't involved in making.
  12. As for Hoffman, the shambling Everyman naturalism he shows here gives God’s Pocket an added elegiac layer that makes its bitter ironies that much more painful.
  13. Duvall and Spacek are so in tune with each other's rhythms -- despite their 20-year age difference -- that it's hard to believe they've never acted together before.
  14. There’s an exhilarating sadness to it all that amounts to cinematic poetry.
  15. Emotionally honest, feel-good saga with a universality that stands out in a season of singularly depressing and cynical Hollywood product.
  16. A remarkable accomplishment, an absorbing documentary about the joy of reading that's also a positively gripping literary mystery.
  17. An enthralling 3-D IMAX documentary.
  18. It's a sharply written, unforgettably directed character study with brilliant performances by Joaquin Phoenix, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams - far more intimate but no less intense than director Paul Thomas Anderson's Oscar-winning last film, "There Will Be Blood.''
  19. A crowd-pleasing baseball movie for people - like me - who don't like baseball movies...Probably the finest baseball movie since "Bull Durham".
  20. Thanks to his (Oldman) mastery, and Alfredson's, no film this year left me hungrier for a sequel.
  21. Like a dedicated teacher, this is a film that stays with you.
  22. Thomas Vinterberg (“The Celebration”) directs with restraint that makes the story all the more affecting.
  23. There is no shortage of indie movies about economically challenged women. This one is different, in that the women actually do something besides just talk about it.
  24. Morales’ spin on the old ransom plot is fresher and more gripping than most big-budget Hollywood products.
  25. A fantastically entertaining biography.
  26. This exhilarating brain-twister is a nonstop visual, aural and intellectual delight, steeped in movie conventions and yet fizzing with freshness. It’s what happens when film noir goes out to a rave.
  27. The quirky High Fidelity really deserves being called the first must-see movie of the century.
    • New York Post
  28. White God has been compared to “The Birds,” but there are also echoes of “Lassie Come Home” and even “Dirty Harry.” Director Kornél Mundruczó goes big with allegory, violence, drama and sentiment, and the results are riveting.
  29. After years of diminishing returns, Woody Allen spectacularly returns to form with Vicky Cristina Barcelona, his funniest movie in years and arguably his sexiest.
  30. Hilarious from first frame to last.

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