New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,583 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The King's Speech
Lowest review score: 0 Bunraku
Score distribution:
6,583 movie reviews
  1. Atriumph on almost every level. It is breathtakingly stylish, wonderfully acted and its three interrelated tales of the "war" on drugs are brilliantly structured to form a cohesive, powerful whole.
  2. Isn't quite as accessible or as deeply moving as his masterpiece, "All About My Mother." It's a tad too self-consciously a work of art for that. But it's still a must-see for anyone who's halfway serious about film.
  3. Isn't just scary, charming and delightfully unpredictable - it's also smarter and subtler than any new movie out there.
  4. A powerful fable about love and addiction that manages to be darkly humorous when it isn't graphic or harrowing in the extreme.
  5. A remarkable accomplishment, an absorbing documentary about the joy of reading that's also a positively gripping literary mystery.
  6. Gripping, smart and moving, without falling prey to sentimentality, it shows what can be achieved when mainstream filmmakers like Howard and Goldsman are genuinely inspired and determined to be honest.
  7. A visually stunning film.
  8. Brilliantly idiosyncratic.
  9. Lilya is portrayed by Oksana Akinshina, who gives a dynamic, heartbreaking performance... She was wonderful in ["Brothers"], but is even more astonishing in Lilya 4-Ever.
  10. Quirkily likable comedy-drama about a family trying to coping with loss, contains three of the best performances you're likely to see in an American movie this year.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    (Osment) delivers what may be the greatest performance ever by a child actor.
  11. An affectionate, often clever and unflaggingly funny satire.
    • New York Post
  12. Hilarious sweet and sour David Mamet comedy.
  13. Norton, returning to cracking form, doesn't try to make the selfish and smug Monty sympathetic -- but he lights up the screen, especially in two fantasy sequences.
  14. In place of elaborate sets, clever filmmaking gives the impression of a central London emptied of people and cars, to eerie effect - and this opening reel is nothing short of magnificent.
  15. The final result, shaped by the brilliantly nimble, pitch-perfect direction of Spike Jonze, and blessed by superb acting, is an extraordinarily clever comedy that falters only in the last 20 minutes.
  16. An enthralling 3-D IMAX documentary.
  17. Drawing inspiration from anime and vintage Looney Toons, this beautifully drafted, offbeat charmer is hip, funny - and a bona fide heart tugger for the whole family.
  18. As hip, funny and truthful a sleeper as has ever flown under Tinseltown's radar.
  19. This demanding puzzle is not for the "Chocolat" crowd, but those who stay with it will experience perhaps the most dazzling film released so far this year - even though a second viewing is virtually mandatory.
    • New York Post
  20. Strictly a love it-or-hate-it proposition, it requires viewers to work at a movie with a narrative that could support at least half a dozen interpretations.
  21. A summery confection crammed with fresh young talented faces that's hard not to love.
  22. One of the year's most engaging films.
  23. [McCarthy] marries beautifully spare compositions with comically abbreviated dialogue to craft something magnificent from a vaguely precious premise that could easily be the foundation for a parody.
  24. Hilariously overblown, "Cruelty" fairly pops at the seams with the beloved eccentricity of Joel and Ethan Coen, from the fiendishly ludicrous scenarios and casually tossed off visual gags to the razor-sharp repartee.
  25. Mostly it's worth seeing Alien, which established Scott as an A-list director, in a theater because his brilliant and often expansive visuals have always worked better on a big screen than on video.
  26. Stunningly photographed, largely with a hand-held camera, by Rodrigo Prieto (another member of the "Amores Perros" team) on gritty locations in Memphis and Albuquerque, 21 Grams is also a visual tour de force - and a rare Hollywood product depicting class differences with any kind of honesty.
  27. A thoughtful, rousing and beautifully crafted epic.
  28. The result is an immensely enjoyable portrait of a strange-looking, non-comforming genius who loved women as much as designing masterpieces but was never able to commit to them. In other words: great architect, lousy family man.
  29. One of the most original and stylish films to come along this year.

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