New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,837 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Flags of Our Fathers
Lowest review score: 0 Noel
Score distribution:
6,837 movie reviews
  1. Expertly mixing tears and laughs with the sort of alchemy not seen since "Terms of Endearment," this superbly written, directed, acted, and yes, Oscar-friendly movie perfectly captures the blackly comic insanity that can overtake a family forced to confront an impending death.
  2. This flick is fast and ferocious, his (Sidney Lumet) sharpest and best since "Prince of the City" (1980) - and surely one of the year's finest.
  3. For all of its laughs and a star-making performance by Hawkins, Happy-Go-Lucky represents a serious philosophical inquiry by Leigh, who has illustrated a consistently pessimistic view of humankind in his semi-improvised movies.
  4. Lassie is a dog movie even non-dog lovers will lap up.
  5. It’s a remarkable story, vividly and urgently told by French-Canadian director Vallée (“The Young Victoria”) from a pointed, schmaltz-free script by Craig Borten and Melissa Wallack.
  6. It’s his home movies with Love and baby — some playful, others drugged and drooling — that fans will find the most emotional viewing. As the credits roll, it’s hard not to just root for the sensitive, progressive, fiercely creative Cobain and wish that he’d lived long enough to find a little peace of mind.
  7. Two fins up for The Cove, a documentary that whales on evil Japanese fishermen who kill dolphins for lunch meat.
  8. It's a highly erotic work that at no point seems staged. Credit brilliant use of fog, mirrors, silhouettes, slow motion and special effects worthy of a music video.
  9. Can’t possibly deserve your close attention. Yet it does, with distilled honky-tonk poetry and generous good humor. It’s one of the year’s best, most deeply felt films.
  10. Powerful, provocative and often surprisingly funny, this may be the year's outstanding documentary.
  11. The final result, shaped by the brilliantly nimble, pitch-perfect direction of Spike Jonze, and blessed by superb acting, is an extraordinarily clever comedy that falters only in the last 20 minutes.
  12. Rarely less than absorbing and never boring over its nearly three-hour length.
  13. A gorgeous and witty piece of stop-motion animation.
  14. In the Loop is certainly the smartest and funniest movie inspired by the Iraq war.
  15. Vigorously played as a young man by Chris Pine, Kirk is a brilliant, sports-car driving, bar-brawling rebel who is finally shamed into joining Starfleet Academy.
  16. An instant classic.
  17. Deep, disturbing and funny.
  18. Miyazaki offers a vivid, at times fantastical view of Japan between the wars, wracked by the Great Depression, a fearsome earthquake that leveled Tokyo in 1923, a tuberculosis epidemic and the rise of fascism.
  19. Sequels don't get much better - or smarter - than the action-, drama-, romance- and comedy-packed Spider-Man 2, which miraculously improves on the webslinger's hugely popular first screen adventure in every imaginable department.
  20. '71
    It’s a rare film that locates viciousness and kindness on both sides of Northern Ireland’s Troubles.
  21. It falls to Hanks and his movie-star presence to anchor this ambitious enterprise, and he does some of his most impressive acting without saying a word.
  22. Mostly it's worth seeing Alien, which established Scott as an A-list director, in a theater because his brilliant and often expansive visuals have always worked better on a big screen than on video.
  23. 56 Up is as good a point as any to get hooked on the magnificent half-century series of documentaries, beginning in 1964 with "7 Up."
  24. One of the year's best films and so tapped into the zeitgeist that it's positively scary.
  25. The friction between a couple of still-struggling artists sounds rather depressing, but in fact the film is often funny; it shows that love is present in even the couple’s harshest exchanges.
  26. The movie all but proclaims U2 the world's best rock band. Somewhere, Mick Jagger's jaws are grinding.
  27. Vol. 2 isn't anywhere near as self-indulgent as its predecessor, but it still plays like the work of a man too in love with his creations to decide which of his darlings to kill - so he ended up with merely a very good movie.
  28. Confirms Leigh's reputation as one of the world's master filmmakers - and showcases Staunton as one of its great actresses.
  29. A deliciously elusive mystery.
  30. The cast is amazing -- two of the lead actresses are first-timers.

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