New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,584 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Lowest review score: 0 No One Lives
Score distribution:
6,584 movie reviews
  1. It's impossible to conceive of this ruefully funny entertainment without Bill Murray, who is nothing less than brilliant.
  2. All the pieces converge in a powerful rush during the second half.
  3. The skillfully acted and directed The Lives of Others is a timely warning about governments that seek to repress dissent.
  4. The movie equivalent of a 12-course feast crammed with unforgettable images and mind-boggling stunts.
  5. Engrossing and exhilarating documentary.
  6. Ida
    Both actresses are extraordinary, but Kulesza — bitter, sarcastic and tragic — carries the movie’s soul.
  7. Koreeda, talented director that he is, never allows the story to sink into soap-opera melodrama, and he refrains from pointing fingers.
  8. I can't wait to see Borat, which has twice as many laughs as all of this year's other movie comedies combined, for a fourth time.
  9. Some documentaries are a fervent search for truth; others are a fervent search for snickers. This one is the latter, providing via interviews and old film clips a Greatest Hits for Bush haters.
  10. The role of William is a perfect fit for Red West, a well-weathered member of Elvis Presley's Memphis Mafia who has served as a bodyguard as well as a stuntman and bit-part actor.
  11. Poetry, which rightfully won the best-screenplay prize at Cannes, never resorts to exploitation. Under Lee's guidence, it is a mature film for mature audiences.
  12. Literally the kind of movie they just don't make anymore, Michel Hazanavicius' French-sponsored charmer The Artist is a gorgeous black-and-white love letter to silent Hollywood with old-fashioned English intertitles and just a single line of audible (English) dialogue.
  13. Audacious, thought-provoking and ruefully funny.
  14. Taken together, Eastwood's masterworks - two of the best films of 2006 - may be Hollywood's last word on World War II.
  15. What "Rent" should have been, Once is: a Bohemian rhapsody.
  16. As hip, funny and truthful a sleeper as has ever flown under Tinseltown's radar.
  17. Director Alfonso Cuaron ("A Little Princess") gets vivid, convincing performances from a fine cast, and generally keeps things going at a rapid pace.
  18. A remarkably assured feature debut by Bennett Miller, a longtime director of commercials (and the documentary "The Cruise") whose no-frills style trusts that the powerful material and the uniformly excellent performances need little embellishment.
  19. The acting and story are solid, but the real star of Tulpan is the gorgeous, never-ending landscape -- flat and arid, and home to camels, goats and lambs, and hearty people who live in tentlike yurts.
  20. Extremely unsettling and thought- provoking.
  21. Mostly a routine love story elevated by one of the year’s most magnetic performances.
  22. Looks great but moves like molasses, is more interesting than truly involving.
  23. Julie Christie is simply astounding as a woman slipping into the ravages of Alzheimer's in Sarah Polley's deeply affecting and artfully crafted Away From Her.
  24. Mafioso starts out as a comedy of manners before turning into a mob thriller that brings Nino to Bergen County, N.J. When he gets there, look for a man reading The Post on a street corner.
  25. Name names, please. Or shut up.
  26. The sequel's battle scenes -- especially the climactic assault on the Helm's Deep fortress by the armies of darkness -- easily put those of the "Star Wars" series to shame.
  27. It is not only an amazing technical accomplishment, it's also the wittiest and best-voiced animated movie to come along in years.
    • New York Post
  28. Old-school filmmaking at its best.
  29. Up
    An exquisite work of cinematic art that also happens to be the funniest, most touching, most exciting and most entertaining movie released so far this year.
  30. “GBH” is a featherweight screwball comedy that, trying mightily to be cosmopolitan, feels awfully provincial, desperately touristy.

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