New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 7,108 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Fifty-Fifty
Lowest review score: 0 6 Month Rule
Score distribution:
7108 movie reviews
  1. A campy docu-drama about the secretly gay world of 1950's muscle magazines.
    • New York Post
  2. To paraphrase that old quip about slow-paced art films, it literally is watching paint dry.
    • New York Post
  3. Well-meaning yawn-fest.
  4. Unfortunately, this version of the familiar formula lacks the inspiration, genuine wit and raunchy charm of 1998's outrageous "There's Something About Mary."
    • New York Post
  5. Remarkably sluggish and not particularly suspenseful.
    • New York Post
  6. Might have worked as a 10-minute sketch.
  7. An awkward hybrid of genres that just doesn't work.
  8. Slicker than most attempts to document Monroe's successes and tragic trajectory, but even her own words don't provide much more of an insight into what made this troubled icon tick.
  9. An occasionally revealing glimpse inside the mind of Chapman before, during and after the assassination.
  10. Clichéd stories, clichéd characters. All that's missing is Ed Burns.
  11. The longest 85-minute road trip you could imagine.
  12. A non-starter.
  13. Despising the British upper class is so utterly common, as we see in The Riot Club, a farcically heavy-handed attempted satiric takedown of an elite group of Oxford students.
  14. I’m probably more intrigued than 99.3 percent of the American public by the idea of deconstructing the hidden symbols in Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining,” but the theories proposed in the doc Room 237 aren’t eye-opening. They’re laughable.
  15. It's not uninteresting, but so much footage is given over to earnest discussion of sexual politics that the overall effect is like sitting through a semester's worth of transgender studies.
  16. There are a lot of casualties in this stylish, unoriginal thriller, but James McAvoy’s knee was the only one that moved me.
  17. Even I realize that other people's babies are boring. So is Babies.
  18. Viewers are left wondering just why they should care about them and the rest of the film's one-dimensional characters.
  19. Here comes Wayne Kramer's Crossing Over, a bid to create the "Crash" of illegal-immigration dramas.
  20. With the exception of “Tape 49” — the Simon Barrett-directed segment about the PI — the films are ridiculously shaky, their camerawork so determinedly guerrilla-style that it’s difficult not to look away, sometimes at crucial moments. Found footage is all well and good, but if it’s unwatchable, it might as well have stayed lost.
  21. Love in Space is just what movie fans have been waiting for: a romantic comedy from Communist China.
  22. The movie doesn't really begin or end. Whether the lights have just gone down or the credits have begun to roll, things are pretty much the same for Henry.
  23. In any case, the presence of O'Hara, Kline, Ramis, Black, Tomlin and John Lithgow (who plays Shaun's father) serve mainly to underline the feebleness of the screenplay and the slackness of the direction.
  24. I hereby award the World War II drama The Great Raid a Cement Star for faithful and distinguished service to the cause of mediocrity.
  25. As for a villain, you could do worse than Bryan Cranston as the evil political overlord who is trying to stamp out the resistance -- When he goes mano a mano with Farrell, it's not spine-tingling. It's embarrassing, like watching a dude beat up his dad.
  26. Despite a crafty premise and a clever kink in the tale that almost saves it, Connolly isn't dexterous enough to achieve the Hitchockian level of suspense the movie needs.
  27. Hopefully Jennifer Lawrence will actually be given something worthwhile to do next time around. That would actually be worth paying to see.
  28. A 12th-grade "Sixth Sense" with a third-rate plot.
  29. This messy, disappointing, self-important and utterly humorless version of the Marvel comic book character may be the toughest flick with a green protagonist to sit through since "The Grinch."
  30. The only possible interest the movie will inspire in anyone comes when Paltrow flashes a breast toward the end, far too late to pump any excitement into an aggressively boring film that gurgles with self-indulgence.

Top Trailers