New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 7,384 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Shakespeare in Love
Lowest review score: 0 London Has Fallen
Score distribution:
7384 movie reviews
  1. So gorgeously animated and so thoroughly entertaining for all ages that only an ogre would complain it's not quite as fresh as the original.
  2. A triumph of low-budget filmmaking.
    • New York Post
  3. It's the well-wrought details that explain, perhaps better than any earlier film, how an entire country bought into Hitler's genocidal madness.
  4. Gorgeous set pieces thrill the senses, but there is philosophical inquiry as well. "Alien" was, after all, just "Jaws" in space, but Prometheus ponders where evil comes from and how it conquers its makers.
  5. You might be reminded of Jean-Jacques Beineix's 1981 thriller "Diva," which also involves crooked cops and Metro chases. But you need never have seen "Diva" to be captivated by the exhilarating Point Blank.
  6. Julie Christie is simply astounding as a woman slipping into the ravages of Alzheimer's in Sarah Polley's deeply affecting and artfully crafted Away From Her.
  7. A powerful fable about love and addiction that manages to be darkly humorous when it isn't graphic or harrowing in the extreme.
  8. East Is East is "The Full Monty" of 2000, a fresh, funny and poignant film filled with sparkling performances.
    • New York Post
  9. This remarkable new documentary from Raymond De Felitta ("City Island") fruitfully revisits the aftermath of a TV doc that his father, Frank, produced for NBC in 1965.
  10. Williams, who was elected president of ASCAP in 2009, speaks frankly and eloquently about his problems dealing with fame, and his recovery. And more important, he earns our thanks by resolutely refusing to let Kessler turn this into a clichéd documentary.
  11. In the Loop is certainly the smartest and funniest movie inspired by the Iraq war.
  12. Adults will be more than passably entertained by this short, patriotic feature, and kids will be entranced.
  13. Adding goofy uncertainty to shoulders as wide as the East River makes for a disarming hero in one of the spiffiest WWII action yarns ever to march out of Hollywood.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The entire film is a feast for the eyes that brings to mind the work of Hong Kong ace Wong Kar-Wai.
  14. Nutty Danish provocateur Lars von Trier -- long one of the most annoying filmmakers on the planet -- turns out one of the year's most emotionally resonant art movies.
  15. The filmmaker doesn't speculate about why these men are talking, but he leaves you with an excellent guess.
  16. It's strange enough to be raised by your aunt. For young John Lennon, things get stranger still when he finds himself dating his mother.
  17. Philippe Béziat’s documentary focuses on how Sivadier and his Violetta, the French soprano Natalie Dessay, fuse acting with the music. It’s an incredible view of artists at work.
  18. Gripping, smart and moving, without falling prey to sentimentality, it shows what can be achieved when mainstream filmmakers like Howard and Goldsman are genuinely inspired and determined to be honest.
  19. In place of elaborate sets, clever filmmaking gives the impression of a central London emptied of people and cars, to eerie effect - and this opening reel is nothing short of magnificent.
  20. It’s a small movie, but in his third feature, indie writer-director Chad Hartigan proves he is a major talent, imbuing the interactions with wit and warmth and charm.
  21. Cars leaves the animated competition in the dust, even if it is a tad slower and more predictable than Pixar at full throttle.
  22. An exhilarating, sweeping epic that begs to be seen on the largest possible screen.
    • New York Post
  23. This demanding puzzle is not for the "Chocolat" crowd, but those who stay with it will experience perhaps the most dazzling film released so far this year - even though a second viewing is virtually mandatory.
    • New York Post
  24. I'm not generally a huge fan of movies with two-or three-person casts -- they tend to resemble filmed plays -- but The Business of Strangers is a knockout.
  25. An instant classic.
  26. Pieta is one of Kim’s most complex and mature efforts, melding violence and humor into dark entertainment.
  27. Includes insightful and often hilarious archival interviews with Langlois and dozens of associates, as well as wonderful footage of Langlois.
  28. This movie doesn't get huffy, it gets laughs.
  29. It’s a captivating throwback that promises to lead the genre away from sci-fi flash and trickery. I’d rank it beside “X-Men: Days of Future Past” among the best X-Men entries.

Top Trailers