New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,860 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Another Year
Lowest review score: 0 The Ugly Truth
Score distribution:
6,860 movie reviews
  1. This spectacularly great reboot is surprisingly owned not by Hardy, who is fine, but by Charlize Theron.
  2. Park's direction is flawless and Jung Jung-hoon's cinematography is stunning.
  3. The breathtaking visual and aural restoration by Coppola and Murch makes the film's original glories even more intense than you remember them.
  4. The actors in Compliance perform with thorough and chilling sincerity.
  5. Profound and majestic.
  6. Director Zack Snyder's cerebral, scintillating follow-up to "300" seems, to even a weary filmgoer's eye, as fresh and magnificent in sound and vision as "2001" must have seemed in 1968, yet in its eagerness to argue with itself, it resembles "A Clockwork Orange."
  7. Genius director Christopher Nolan reaches for the stars in Interstellar — and delivers a soulful, must-see masterpiece, one of the most exhilarating film experiences so far this century.
  8. Well-meaning films like “Lincoln’’ and “Lee Daniels’ The Butler’’ merely scratch the surface compared to the deep and painful truths laid bare by 12 Years a Slave. It’s about time, Scarlett O’Hara.
  9. Perhaps the year's most daring and fully realized movie, is a pitch-perfect re-creation of '50s melodramas, showcasing a four-hankie performance by a peroxided Julianne Moore.
  10. The result is a magnificent feast for the eyes and brain.
  11. A sublime meditation that is one of this year's wisest, warmest and funniest films.
  12. Caouette has used art, wit and a huge heart to forge his experiences into an unqualified masterpiece.
  13. It’s his home movies with Love and baby — some playful, others drugged and drooling — that fans will find the most emotional viewing. As the credits roll, it’s hard not to just root for the sensitive, progressive, fiercely creative Cobain and wish that he’d lived long enough to find a little peace of mind.
  14. One of the oddest, most perplexing -- and delightful -- films to come along this year. And last year, too.
  15. A Japanese cross between "Alice in Wonderland" and "The Wizard of Oz" -- is such a landmark in animation that labeling it a masterpiece almost seems inadequate.
  16. All hail the great Helen Mirren, who after her triumph in HBO's "Elizabeth," delivers the performance of a lifetime as that monarch's frumpy, 20th century namesake in Stephen Frear's witty, touching and engrossing The Queen.
  17. Dropping by on the same people every seven years like an old friend - or an unwelcome relative - Apted has constructed a peerless, suspenseful work that develops character to a depth that would make Tolstoy jealous. If you have any interest in documentaries, watch the DVD of the first film, "7 Up" (49 Up hits DVD Nov. 14). You won't be able to stop.
  18. Miyazaki offers a vivid, at times fantastical view of Japan between the wars, wracked by the Great Depression, a fearsome earthquake that leveled Tokyo in 1923, a tuberculosis epidemic and the rise of fascism.
  19. Like the fictional Clarice Starling in "The Silence of the Lambs,'' Maya is a consummate professional who brilliantly performs her job in an often hostile work environment.
  20. Deep, disturbing and funny.
  21. Smiling more than in all of his movies since "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" combined, Penn goes way deep and soulful in a highly ingratiating performance that's the one to beat for the Best Actor Oscar.
  22. Short and sweet, small and smart, Tadpole is the oasis in the desert of dopey summer blockbusters - an uproarious, sophisticated coming-of-age comedy so flawlessly written, acted and directed it seems practically miraculous.
  23. Whip-smart, sexy and delightfully twisty romantic thriller.
  24. A blue-chip Oscar contender that's also a rousing popcorn movie, Ben Affleck's Argo offers plenty of nail-biting thrills as well as funnier scenes than you'd ever imagine possible in the grim context of the Iran hostage crisis.
  25. While Tarr's newest epic, Werckmeister Harmonies, isn't intended for the shopping-mall crowd, it is more viewer-friendly and will please adventurous moviegoers.
  26. Expertly mixing tears and laughs with the sort of alchemy not seen since "Terms of Endearment," this superbly written, directed, acted, and yes, Oscar-friendly movie perfectly captures the blackly comic insanity that can overtake a family forced to confront an impending death.
  27. Hollywood's Woman of the Year is a pregnant 16-year-old, the incredibly hip, smart-mouthed and totally endearing heroine of the wise and witty Juno.
  28. What a sweet collision is Rescue Dawn: the American psycho meets the German kook.
  29. It's time to stop calling Azazel Jacobs a "promising" filmmaker. With Momma's Man, Jacobs achieves the promise.
  30. Less a conventional biography than a performance film - one that stuns and delights.
  31. An unqualified triumph, the year's best movie so far.
    • New York Post
  32. It takes a world-class storyteller and a great yarn to rivet your attention for nearly three hours. This very classy, old-school movie - employing cutting-edge technology that will make your eyes pop - did it for me.
  33. This eye-popping, inspired and often-demented (in a good way) cross between "The Red Shoes" and "All About Eve" channels horror maestros David Cronenberg, Brian De Palma and Dario Argento.
  34. Twice I have left a Calvary screening feeling dazed and moved.
  35. Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves is the purest, boldest re-imagining of silent cinema yet.
  36. Taken together, Eastwood's masterworks - two of the best films of 2006 - may be Hollywood's last word on World War II.
  37. The very sex-positive The Sessions treats intimacy with an explicitness and honesty that's very rare in movies. It may be the first film that doesn't turn premature ejaculation into a punch line.
  38. The movie equivalent of a 12-course feast crammed with unforgettable images and mind-boggling stunts.
  39. Whether Tiny Furniture is a mumblecore movie is an open question. It has many of the tell-tale signs of that ill-defined genre; although improvised dialogue, a mumblecore staple, is minimal.
  40. A really classic adventure yarn with one of Hollywood's great actors hitting one out of the ballpark. If you're seeing only one movie this season, this is the obvious choice.
    • New York Post
  41. Many of the images — and Salgado’s accounts of taking them — are as soul-shattering as they are breathtaking.
  42. Sheer delight. An ensemble comedy-drama that recalls Robert Altman's best work.
  43. Who's going to love it? Anyone with a sense of humor: Team America: World Police is hands-down the funniest movie of the year.
  44. Petzold raises questions of honor and builds the romance with an absolutely rigorous lack of sentiment, moving Barbara to a sweeping finish as emotionally satisfying as any this year.
  45. This is one perfectly terrifying movie, an instant classic.
  46. Essential viewing not just for those fascinated by adventure, exploration and survival, but for anyone interested in the magic of leadership.
  47. Nothing this year comes close to being as utterly unforgettable as Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth, an extremely dark and disturbing fairy tale for audiences say, ages 12 and up.
  48. A gorgeous, poetic and stirring epic.
  49. Beach ("Windtalkers") gives a tremendously moving, Oscar-caliber performance as Hayes, portrayed by Tony Curtis in an earlier movie and celebrated in a song performed by both Johnny Cash and Bob Dylan.
  50. If there is a genius working in Hollywood today, it's animation director Brad Bird, who tops the delightful "The Incredibles" with arguably the finest 'toon in the Pixar canon, Ratatouille.
  51. The best and most entertaining movie adaptation of a stage musical so far this century - and yes, I’m including the Oscar-winning "Chicago."
  52. A charming, hilarious robot love story aimed at the entire family.
  53. About Elly shows that the ethical dilemmas of ordinary adults can, with this level of talent, become as gripping as any thriller.
  54. Being John Malkovich, which contains not a frame of extraneous footage, is more than a must-see movie: It's a must-see-more-than-once event.
    • New York Post
  55. Quite possibly the first truly great fact-based movie of the 21st century.
  56. It's a highly erotic work that at no point seems staged. Credit brilliant use of fog, mirrors, silhouettes, slow motion and special effects worthy of a music video.
  57. An all-time classic that seems even better after two decades.
  58. There’s no shortage of brains, brawn, eye candy, wit and even some poetry in this epic battle between massive lizard-like monsters and 25-story-high robots operated by humans.
  59. What might seem like showing off in another movie is dazzling storytelling here, packing in an hour's worth of human misery.
  60. Bursting with energy and originality even after 36 years, A Hard Day's Night is easily the best show in town.
    • New York Post
  61. It's hard to remember a film that mixes disparate, delicate ingredients with the subtlety and virtuosity of Sofia Coppola's brilliant The Virgin Suicides.
  62. It is filmmaking as it should be but usually isn't.
  63. This is perhaps the most effective 3-D movie I have ever seen, with a sophisticated, involving story that will appeal to many adults. The only reservation I have is with the PG rating, which seems too lenient for a story that may give very young children - particularly if they are sensitive - nightmares.
  64. So gorgeously animated and so thoroughly entertaining for all ages that only an ogre would complain it's not quite as fresh as the original.
  65. A triumph of low-budget filmmaking.
    • New York Post
  66. It's the well-wrought details that explain, perhaps better than any earlier film, how an entire country bought into Hitler's genocidal madness.
  67. Gorgeous set pieces thrill the senses, but there is philosophical inquiry as well. "Alien" was, after all, just "Jaws" in space, but Prometheus ponders where evil comes from and how it conquers its makers.
  68. You might be reminded of Jean-Jacques Beineix's 1981 thriller "Diva," which also involves crooked cops and Metro chases. But you need never have seen "Diva" to be captivated by the exhilarating Point Blank.
  69. Julie Christie is simply astounding as a woman slipping into the ravages of Alzheimer's in Sarah Polley's deeply affecting and artfully crafted Away From Her.
  70. A powerful fable about love and addiction that manages to be darkly humorous when it isn't graphic or harrowing in the extreme.
  71. East Is East is "The Full Monty" of 2000, a fresh, funny and poignant film filled with sparkling performances.
    • New York Post
  72. This remarkable new documentary from Raymond De Felitta ("City Island") fruitfully revisits the aftermath of a TV doc that his father, Frank, produced for NBC in 1965.
  73. Williams, who was elected president of ASCAP in 2009, speaks frankly and eloquently about his problems dealing with fame, and his recovery. And more important, he earns our thanks by resolutely refusing to let Kessler turn this into a clichéd documentary.
  74. In the Loop is certainly the smartest and funniest movie inspired by the Iraq war.
  75. Adults will be more than passably entertained by this short, patriotic feature, and kids will be entranced.
  76. Adding goofy uncertainty to shoulders as wide as the East River makes for a disarming hero in one of the spiffiest WWII action yarns ever to march out of Hollywood.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The entire film is a feast for the eyes that brings to mind the work of Hong Kong ace Wong Kar-Wai.
  77. Nutty Danish provocateur Lars von Trier -- long one of the most annoying filmmakers on the planet -- turns out one of the year's most emotionally resonant art movies.
  78. The filmmaker doesn't speculate about why these men are talking, but he leaves you with an excellent guess.
  79. It's strange enough to be raised by your aunt. For young John Lennon, things get stranger still when he finds himself dating his mother.
  80. Philippe Béziat’s documentary focuses on how Sivadier and his Violetta, the French soprano Natalie Dessay, fuse acting with the music. It’s an incredible view of artists at work.
  81. Gripping, smart and moving, without falling prey to sentimentality, it shows what can be achieved when mainstream filmmakers like Howard and Goldsman are genuinely inspired and determined to be honest.
  82. In place of elaborate sets, clever filmmaking gives the impression of a central London emptied of people and cars, to eerie effect - and this opening reel is nothing short of magnificent.
  83. Cars leaves the animated competition in the dust, even if it is a tad slower and more predictable than Pixar at full throttle.
  84. An exhilarating, sweeping epic that begs to be seen on the largest possible screen.
    • New York Post
  85. This demanding puzzle is not for the "Chocolat" crowd, but those who stay with it will experience perhaps the most dazzling film released so far this year - even though a second viewing is virtually mandatory.
    • New York Post
  86. I'm not generally a huge fan of movies with two-or three-person casts -- they tend to resemble filmed plays -- but The Business of Strangers is a knockout.
  87. An instant classic.
  88. Pieta is one of Kim’s most complex and mature efforts, melding violence and humor into dark entertainment.
  89. Includes insightful and often hilarious archival interviews with Langlois and dozens of associates, as well as wonderful footage of Langlois.
  90. This movie doesn't get huffy, it gets laughs.
  91. The role of William is a perfect fit for Red West, a well-weathered member of Elvis Presley's Memphis Mafia who has served as a bodyguard as well as a stuntman and bit-part actor.
  92. Rarely less than absorbing and never boring over its nearly three-hour length.
  93. Like some of Hitchcock's films, the story - adapted from a novel by Charlotte Armstrong, an American mystery writer of the '40s and '50s - can be accused of stretching credibility and coincidence almost to the breaking point.
  94. Be warned: Though it's entirely justified by the story, there's a level of violence and brutality in Training Day -- that some terror-weary audience members may not care to cope with these days.
  95. Lilya is portrayed by Oksana Akinshina, who gives a dynamic, heartbreaking performance... She was wonderful in ["Brothers"], but is even more astonishing in Lilya 4-Ever.
  96. Genuinely creepy Southern Gothic thriller that once again proves that in horror movies, sometimes less is actually more.
  97. The result is an immensely enjoyable portrait of a strange-looking, non-comforming genius who loved women as much as designing masterpieces but was never able to commit to them. In other words: great architect, lousy family man.
  98. Turns out to be one of the most absorbing films of the year. Plus it has lots of wiener jokes.
  99. So terrifically entertaining, it would be a shame if it didn't inspire a companion piece on New York.

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