New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,698 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Song of the Sea
Lowest review score: 0 The Smurfs
Score distribution:
6,698 movie reviews
  1. Confirms Leigh's reputation as one of the world's master filmmakers - and showcases Staunton as one of its great actresses.
  2. Iraqi-Kurdish director-writer Hiner Saleem is in no hurry to tell the story, and viewers drawn in by the warm-hearted tale and charmingly eccentric characters will be in no hurry for the closing credits.
  3. Anderson gives The Machinist a sickly noirish look that contributes to the creeping horror - but it's the emaciated Bale's spectral presence that leaves the imprint.
  4. Ray
    Contains large helpings of Hollywood schmaltz, stereotype and clich‚, but it's also pretty impossible to resist.
  5. Devoid of 21st-century irony, this visually stunning, action-packed yuletide treat is sweet and, yes, magical in a way that will enchant kids and give older viewers a twinge of nostalgia.
  6. It's as purely entertaining as it is thought-provoking and timely.
  7. Hilarious from first frame to last.
  8. The sweet script, crisp direction and a delightful performance by Leila Hatami, as the sad-eyed wife, should put Deserted Station on your must-see list.
  9. One of the year's best.
  10. One of the year's best.
  11. East Is East is "The Full Monty" of 2000, a fresh, funny and poignant film filled with sparkling performances.
    • New York Post
  12. You can tell this is a smart take on Hamlet from the first wordless opening shots.
  13. Woody Allen's most purely entertaining film in years.
  14. In-depth performances by De Niro and Gooding Jr. provide the oxygen for this extremely shipshape biopic.
  15. I'm not generally a huge fan of movies with two-or three-person casts -- they tend to resemble filmed plays -- but The Business of Strangers is a knockout.
  16. You don't have to know Chile's bloody history to be moved by the poignant new film Machuca, the first movie made by a Chilean about the country's 1973 military coup.
  17. An intoxicating, heartbreaking Turkish-German drama that's already won a slew of awards from international film festivals.
  18. Kore-eda presents the deeply moving story in a documentary style that is both gentle and compelling.
  19. It's the well-wrought details that explain, perhaps better than any earlier film, how an entire country bought into Hitler's genocidal madness.
  20. Sobering and important.
  21. The less you know going in, the more you'll enjoy it. Suffice it to say that it's a hugely entertaining thriller disguised as a chick flick.
  22. Gut-Bustingly funny moves are pretty rare, so hustle over to Kung Fu Hustle, actor-director Ste phen Chow's exhilaratingly hilarious and affectionate send-up of Hong Kong action flicks.
  23. Akhavan plays each change brilliantly in a film that is so tightly controlled that the mere glimpse of a new beard or a prayer mat being unrolled becomes a moment of horror.
  24. Solondz beats on abortion defenders, stomps on the pro-life crowd and finishes up by telling us there is no free will. If you want some easy laughs tonight you'd be better off curling up with some Kierkegaard.
  25. Not for the squeamish, but it is a beautifully crafted and thoughtful film that genuinely provokes.
  26. A long, messy cinematic novel full of hate, love, murder, ghosts, madness, poetry and Catherine Deneuve.
  27. It could turn someone who never heard of the Flaming Lips into a devoted fan.
  28. Or
    Like mother, like daughter best sums up Or (My Treasure), a raw drama.
  29. If the director had more gospel and less blues in him, it might have brought him closer to really understanding these talents. Still, I can't wait for "Rize 2: Electric Boogaloo."
  30. A remarkable, eye-popping nature documentary.
  31. If you enjoy intelligent, challenging filmmaking, Tropical Malady is for you.
  32. Fast-moving, psychologically savvy.
  33. Like Roald Dahl's book, Tim Burton's splendidly imaginative and visually stunning - and often very dark and creepy - new version of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is squarely aimed more at children than their parents.
  34. The flick brings two hours of great big sloppy buck-wild laughs by morphing into a cross between "Meet the Parents" and "Some Like It Hot."
  35. A yellow dog of a movie that delights in offending the offendable. It's also a whitesploitation classic, from its menacing sideburns to its demented laughter.
  36. An achingly beautiful look at the most tragic victims of the longtime war in Chechnya: children.
  37. You'll either be screaming with laughter - or be incredibly offended.
  38. 2046 is a bit overlong and not for all tastes, but fans of "In the Mood for Love" will relish this second helping, which is more emotionally substantial than the first.
  39. All of this is punctuated with refreshingly strange wit.
  40. Herzog tries to make sense out of the blond-haired young man, who looked an awful lot like Kinski.
  41. Expect a sequel -- perhaps one with a more satisfying conclusion.
  42. Just Like Heaven isn't far short of a classic among romantic comedies with a teary chaser, sure to please fans of "Ghost" and "Heaven Can Wait."
  43. An instant classic.
  44. In his fourth outing with the director, cinematographer Andreas Sinanos produces stunning scene after stunning scene, almost as if each frame were a small painting.
  45. Adults will be more than passably entertained by this short, patriotic feature, and kids will be entranced.
  46. A remarkably assured feature debut by Bennett Miller, a longtime director of commercials (and the documentary "The Cruise") whose no-frills style trusts that the powerful material and the uniformly excellent performances need little embellishment.
  47. With its dry wit and all-star household, Baumbach's movie resembles Wes Anderson's "The Royal Tenenbaums" without the heavy whimsy.
  48. If animated dogs were eligible for acting awards, the Oscar would go to Gromit.
  49. Includes insightful and often hilarious archival interviews with Langlois and dozens of associates, as well as wonderful footage of Langlois.
  50. A classic social drama in the proud tradition of "Norma Rae," "Silkwood" and "Erin Brockovich."
  51. Thebest sports movies aren't really about sports. Dreamer has a few thundering horse races, but its finest moments are beautifully still ones, like the one in which a little girl peeks through a fence to give a lame filly a Popsicle.
  52. Like Truffaut's heaviest work, it's less interested in what brings people together than in what keeps them apart, and it achieves a painful truth you won't find in dating comedies.
  53. Combining a thoughtful script with splendid acting -- especially by Sansa -- Bellocchio has fashioned a tense thriller that is both understated and powerful.
  54. Clooney, who gained 35 pounds for the role, gives a self-effacing but highly effective performance.
  55. Constantly battling, Hoskins and Dench have terrific chemistry together.
  56. Its many pleasures derive from the way this drama unfolds unexpectedly from the characters rather than imposing itself on them.
  57. A deliciously elusive mystery.
  58. Censors in Iran must have been smoking weed when they approved I'm Taraneh, 15, a sympathetic portrait of an unwed mother.
  59. Veers between mystery, comedy, philosophical inquest and medical/psychological drama.
  60. This is a guy comedy being mismarketed as a chick flick, complete with a poster that looks like a page from Lucky magazine.
  61. An entertaining piece of pulp fiction.
  62. 4
    It's not always clear exactly what's happening in this dark tale, full of barking dogs and slabs of meat. But you won't be able to take your eyes from the screen; nor will you quickly forget this fiercely original eye-popper.
  63. It'll make you want to dig out your Whitesnake T-shirt. It might even convince Tipper Gore that heavy metal thunder is all in good fun.
  64. Similar to the recent Emmanuelle Devos drama "Gilles' Wife," but it's as cool as that one was melodramatic.
  65. Showcases a brilliantly realistic performance by Abbie Cornish as Heidi. She's a provocative mix of naivete and ripe, unbridled sexuality.
  66. It's a long, brutal and honest look at a shattering event some Americans would apparently prefer not to see depicted - but also a respectful, inspiring one that's in no way exploitative or emotionally manipulative.
  67. If they were still making Looney Tunes, they'd look a lot like Over the Hedge.
  68. Cars leaves the animated competition in the dust, even if it is a tad slower and more predictable than Pixar at full throttle.
  69. We get to know three of these courageous, funny, smart and perhaps permanently damaged men in a film that largely avoids telling us what to think and makes an effort to get near the truth of the soldiers' experience.
  70. This distaff "Hoop Dreams" is less of an epic than the earlier movie, and less deep, but it's got more sunshine, too.
  71. You're either going to love this film and run out to see everything Majewski has directed, or you're going to be bored silly. I'm hoping for the former.
  72. Bryan Singer's super, soulful and very expensive new resurrection of the venerable big-screen franchise, ups the ante with must-see results.
  73. If you can tell the difference between a mule and a pump, attendance at The Devil Wears Prada is mandatory. You might have to reach back to "Funny Face" to find a fashion movie so on-trend.
  74. The movie itself is a powerful cocktail of not just sex and love but race, poverty, colonialism and jealousy.
  75. Time to Leave just might be Ozon's best work yet. He tackles a sensitive, off-putting subject with a dignity that will put viewers at ease. Poupaud connects as the dying man and Moreau is - Moreau, a French national treasure.
  76. Miami Vice isn't an action flick but a neo-noir: tough, quiet, moody and hard.
  77. A slumber-party classic that belongs on the same shelf as "Bring It On" and "10 Things I Hate About You." This high-school comedy should do for its 20-year-old star, Brittany Snow, what those movies did for Kirsten Dunst and Julia Stiles.
  78. Starts slowly but builds, Hitchcock-style, to a terrifying crescendo. And don't fool yourself into thinking you know what's going to happen.
  79. Inspired by Edgar Allan Poe and the Marquis de Sade (interesting combination, no?).
  80. It's brilliant work.
  81. Lassie is a dog movie even non-dog lovers will lap up.
  82. An acid trip of a movie about a piece of Los Angeles history that exists no more: the Ambassador Hotel.
  83. The Last King of Scotland is a parable shocking in its truth, jolting in its lack of sentimentality, Shakespearean in its vision of the doctor's catastrophic flaw.
  84. The profanity-laced but witty and literate dialogue by William Monahan ("Kingdom of Heaven") is delivered by a brilliantly chosen cast, almost all of whom are operating at the very top of their game.
  85. This superb documentary about the Catholic Church's worst pedophile scandal is in many ways far scarier than any fiction.
  86. Dizzy with celebrity, New York society and gay life (if all that isn't the same thing), Infamous is more fun. But "Capote" is a better movie.
  87. Coppola works in weird ways, but the real Versailles was so much weirder.
  88. This year's actress to watch is Elizabeth Reaser, who delivers a tour de force as a determined German mail-order bride who comes to 1920 Minnesota in Ali Selim's captivating indie Sweet Land.
  89. Five people did escape, and they contribute their stories to the spellbinding documentary.
  90. Described as a cross between "Mildred Pierce" and "Arsenic and Old Lace" by Almodóvar - which ought to be more than enough to entice his fans.
  91. If Martin Scorsese were 30 and a Los Angeleno, he'd be making movies much like this one.
  92. The skillfully acted and directed The Lives of Others is a timely warning about governments that seek to repress dissent.
  93. Arguably the year's most entertaining art-house film.
  94. What do you get when you mix a Douglas Sirk melodrama with a Sergio Leone Western? Tears of the Black Tiger, a high-camp Western from, of all places, Thailand.
  95. This movie sends you into the night thinking, maybe even a little afraid. Bravo, Mr. Fincher.
  96. A fantastical genre-buster.
  97. Overall, this gorgeously designed and photographed movie artfully depicts the immigrant experience in ways that transcend its setting, melding Hollywood and Bollywood storytelling techniques to weave a tale a large audience will relate to.
  98. Julie Christie is simply astounding as a woman slipping into the ravages of Alzheimer's in Sarah Polley's deeply affecting and artfully crafted Away From Her.
  99. Not many people are making silent horror serials these days, but Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin pushes his love of lurid melodrama to the limit in his latest demented treat, Brand Upon the Brain!
  100. What "Rent" should have been, Once is: a Bohemian rhapsody.

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