New York Post's Scores

For 858 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Reunion: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Blood and Oil: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 623
  2. Negative: 0 out of 623
623 tv reviews
  1. A show so unusual in its format and plot that it will rival both "Lost" and "24" in creativity and "The O.C." in its character development.
  2. A wall-to-wall weepfest.
  3. If you love a big, seriously politically incorrect, brilliantly funny show that delivers belly laughs of the "South Park" quantity, then this one's for you.
  4. Maddening and exciting.
  5. Nothing but shocker after shocker.
  6. So what is there to like about this show? The same thing there was to like about "The Sopranos" and "The Shield" - great writing, insanely good acting, deeply troubled and deeply layered characters and a plot that will keep you glued to your seat.
  7. "Elizabeth I" soars on every level from the writing, to the directing to the acting.
  8. Its scripts - always among the finest on TV - are even stronger this time around.
  9. It's not only laugh-out-loud-until-soda-squirts-out-of-your-nose funny, but it's also perfectly cast.
  10. Happily, "Weeds" hasn't dropped a petal or missed even a beat this season.
  11. One of the finest TV shows ever made.
  12. OK - so plausibility is not this show's strong suit. It never has been. This show is about suspense, action and violence. And, as a look at the show's first four hours reveals, all three have been taken up several notches in the series' sixth season.
  13. Disturbing, sober and flawless.
  14. Not only the funniest new show this season, but the strangest one since "Get A Life."
  15. The dialog is crisply Pileggi, natch, but it's the flavor of South Beach, the most exciting American city in the 1990's (before the tourists realized that it was safe to go back in the water) that's captured precisely.
  16. Showtime's glorious, gorgeous "The Tudors" is the best series since "The Sopranos." Period.
  17. As profane as "Deadwood" and as profound as "The Sopranos," the series strikes every right chord.
  18. Everyone is spectacular, even the secondary players like Leonard Armond Robinson as Mickey Rivers, who steals more scenes than bases, and Erik Jensen, who so underplays Munson that he's mesmerizing - and, most especially, Michael Rispoli, who plays Jimmy Breslin - or should I say becomes Breslin? Don't miss it. Just great.
  19. If you check out Mad Men tonight, I guarantee you'll be back next week.
  20. This new 10-episode season boasts the same high quality of production that this series has always exhibited.
  21. The [first two episodes] are filled with mystery, suspense, action and the lush greenery of Hawaii, where the show is filmed. Be there. Aloha.
  22. Combs does a great, great job--especially for someone who isn't known as an actor. And the rest of this cast glows. Don't miss it--and don't let your kids miss it either.
  23. If the "opening statements" don't have you on the floor calling for a back brace--because you've thrown your spine out from laughing--then you are either in a coma or watching a different channel.
  24. Both "The Closer" and Saving Grace are at the top of their games in tonight's premiere episodes.
  25. For better or worse, The Shield set the standard for what is now permissible on basic cable. It's one of those shows I can't imagine living without.
  26. As good and as riveting as the high school football-as-soap-opera show has been in the past, this season is even better.
  27. Fey's back to her day job tonight and 30 Rock is as funny as ever, as cynical as we hoped, and as fresh as if it were a freshman show.
  28. All the new characters are wonderfully drawn, including FBI agent Walker (Annie Wersching); bad, bad guy Jonas Hodges (Jon Voight); a new Chloe-type nerd (Janeane Garofalo). Especially good are Jones and her husband (Colm Feore), who is more consumed with solving his son's death than in being First Man. Whew! Thank God there is Jack Bauer--unchanging, unflinching.
  29. The Tudors, Showtime's all-of-the-above series, comes roaring back Sunday night as fresh as its first season.
  30. This new phase takes the show from sometimes cartoonish to serious, punctuated with belly-laugh dialogue. This is thanks, in no small part, to Michael J. Fox, who is in six episodes this year.
  31. I will tell you that Lange and Barrymore deserve Emmys as does the production, which is so authentic you can see the real silk char meuse oozing off socialite shoulders.
  32. Was it worth the wait? Are you kidding me? Does London Fog make raincoats?
  33. I just finished watching screener episodes of Romano's new show, Men Of A Certain Age, which he created with "Everybody Loves Raymond" writer Mike Royce, and I'm blown away.
  34. As important as those set battles scenes are to the series, they are blended beautifully with the bravery, frailties, strength and weaknesses of the actual people involved.
  35. To paraphrase one of the great ads from the glory days: Between love and Mad Men lies obsession.
  36. These killers are more fun than a cemetery full of psycho zombie killers on Halloween.
  37. It's hilarious and even funnier this year than last.
  38. Treme is like Cajun food--it's spicy, it's weird and it's good, but it takes a while to appreciate.
  39. In the weeks ahead, there is a tremendous amount of not-to-be-missed drama--including the area's first face transplant.
  40. It looks like AMC is three-for-three with their newest original drama, Rubicon, a throwback espionage thriller that takes place in the present--if the present were more like the 1970s than the 2000s.
  41. Unlike a few characters in seasons one and two whose lives I just wasn't interested in, I won't be skipping any therapy sessions this season. They are all fascinating.
  42. The Lebowitz film, Public Speaking, directed by Martin Scorsese and produced by Graydon Carter--combines hilarious, contemporary interviews with Lebowitz about life in NYC, mixed with old clips of her in the Andy Warhol days, and great clips of her appearances on old talk shows.
  43. The instant chemistry among the three judges was so right, they couldn't have created it in a lab. Everything that made us fall in love with Idol in the first place was back.
  44. Will Big Love go out with a big bang? If the final season's opener is any indication, the answer is a big "yes."
  45. A bleak, slow-moving, humorless show that is still so good that you will be angry every time an episode ends.
  46. The miniseries--starring Greg Kinnear as JFK, Barry Pepper as Bobby, Katie Holmes as Jacqueline and Tom Wilkinson as Joseph Sr.--is without a doubt one of the best, most riveting, historically accurate dramas about a time and place in American history that has ever been done for TV.
  47. If you're not a big fan of Gaga, or even if you think she's Madonna lite, this HBO concert film will make you a true believer--or a believer, at any rate.
  48. Not only is it really well thought out, but the good-looking kids in the show can actually act.
  49. Sounds boring, but it's anything but.
  50. It's all as addictive as an uber-fresh, ice-cold slice of watermelon on one of the hills of Rome in the scorching heat.
  51. Showtime's edgy, edge-of-your-seat series, is, bar none, the best thriller on American TV.
  52. This engagingly uncomfortable series is not like anything you've seen before.
  53. You'll be happy to know that at least as far as the first two episodes go (90 -minute season premiere this Sunday night), the show is better than ever--which would have seemed impossible.
  54. An intriguing, well-done documentary.
  55. It is so crisp and clean and the clarity is so great that you will definitely forget that what you are watching is real.
  56. It's every bit as good as "The Sopranos" was in its prime.
  57. The producers of Work of Art have managed to take something that is never a big draw (excuse the unintentional cheesy pun), art, and have made it into something so enlightening and, yes, exciting that it's positively magical.
  58. The series seamlessly moves between the horrors of war and the gentility of life in the show's titular 100-room manor.
  59. With an impossibly good cast, writing so spot-on it's poetic, and slow-build stories, I, for one, was left wanting more--even after watching the entire season.
  60. Frozen Planet [is] perhaps the single greatest accomplishment in nature TV history.
  61. It's the possibility of unlimited complications looming that make it so insanely riveting.
  62. The Game is worth it. Really.
  63. A hilarious new sitcom about a female vice president of the United States, Selina Meyer, played with insanely good timing by Julia Louis-Dreyfus.
  64. It's one heckuva fascinating look into a world and a culture with which most of us have little or no experience.
  65. Each week, the series takes on a Holmes classic, updates it, turns it on its ear and leaves you breathless.
  66. They've added a new element that makes it something I can finally (I'm sorry) sink my teeth into. They've added politics as blood sport.
  67. It just feels like nothing else you've seen on TV.
  68. A show that manages year after year to accomplish that rare blend of Hollywood darling and fan favorite.
  69. Happily, they are not your average sitcom weirdo crazy group-therapy people. These folks are oddballs, yes, but they are oddballs trying to overcome great tragedy.
  70. Without a doubt, Homeland is the best drama on TV right now.
  71. Even though we all know what happens, somehow in the hands of these magnificent women, you'll be wishing and hoping for a different ending.
  72. Nashville is arguably the best-written new TV series of the fall season.
  73. The Walking Dead, the flat-out scariest, best, most unusual show to ever hit the small screen, is back, and I'm loving every sickening minute of it.
  74. If you weren't born when the Stones broke all the rules, you will get to see why these old guys were/are the greatest of all time. If you were around then you already know, but you still won't believe it.
  75. By the second part of this excellent thriller you won't know who are the bad guys and who are the really bad guys, which is how it's supposed to be.
  76. A frisky little triumph of real spirit and a collaboration between creator-writer-supervising producer Paul Feig ("Life Sold Separately") and executive producer Judd Apatow ("The Larry Sanders Show"). You'll feel better about yourself, and television - if only you'll stay home on Saturdays to watch it. [25 Sept 1999, p.53]
    • New York Post
  77. A very funny, very hip, very terrific sci-fi show.
  78. What would you get if you combined the brains behind "The Usual Suspects" and "The X-Men" with the writer of "Quiz Show" and "Homicide: Life On the Streets"? Aside from a lotta smarts, you'd get House, the best new show since "Lost." [16 Nov 2004, p.91]
    • New York Post
  79. This six-part series is so layered and unexpected that nothing follows a tried-and-true formula.... This is great TV.
  80. Mirren and Pacino are fantastic, and Tambor rightfully underplays the larger-than-life Cutler, who rivals Spector himself.
  81. Not as much sex as you may be used to, but plenty of action, and enough complexities to keep geeks, geniuses and fans glued to the strange and wonderful world of the Seven Kingdoms all spring.
  82. By episode three, things are roiling up and rolling around.
  83. So far, so great.
  84. WHO knew Craig T. Nelson had so much charisma? [7 Oct 2000, p.55]
    • New York Post
  85. I am happy to report that this series remains a 100-percent authentic, white-knuckled hair-raiser. [24 Oct 2002]
    • New York Post
  86. I love this show. I never thought I'd love a reality show, because mostly I hated all those shows with their wannabe models, fat yutzes and half-wits who try to be as smart as the fat yutz from "Survivor" but are dumber than a family tree of Bushes. But this one actually is so good I am already addicted.
    • New York Post
  87. The talented hopefuls they pick are either so needy, driven or over-confident that you can't help but to be riveted by their plights. [7 Dec 2005]
    • New York Post
  88. The best detective show to come along in, well, decades...It is so clever, that it makes you remember how good TV used to be - and still can be when they use actors who didn't train at Ford Models. And when they hire writers who can actually put two words together...I promise you, you've never seen anything quite like it. [11 July 2002, p.73]
    • New York Post
  89. A true-life movie so good, so well-written and yet sleazy enough to satisfy even the cheesiest viewers among us.
  90. Great acting, writing and direction.
  91. If you love English mysteries, and love the old Inspector Morse, you will love young inspector Morse more.
  92. I tend to watch "Curb Your Enthusiasm" with open-mouthed amazement... The show is a drop-dead accurate, edge-of-your-seat depiction of the minefield through which we all tread everyday in our interactions with spouses, friends, business associates and that most dreaded of all groups, total strangers. [13 Sep 2002]
    • New York Post
  93. This is the funniest TV show I've ever seen. It might also be the best comedy series ever made, period. [2 Jan 2004]
    • New York Post
  94. The best new show this season. [5 Aug 2005]
    • New York Post
  95. An outstanding documentary.
  96. No pair of actors on any other show, new or old, on any network is as pleasurable to behold as these two. [1 Oct 2004]
    • New York Post
  97. The acting here is first-rate, and the two adversarial cops investigating the case--Alec Hardy (David Tennant) and Ellie Miller (Olivia Colman)--despise each other just enough to create a palatable tension. The second episode is even more provocative.... Riveting.
  98. I laughed so much, I'm sure I hurt something, maybe in my back, or maybe in my front. [16 July 2004, p.121]
    • New York Post
  99. After watching the 10-hour Band of Brothers, I'm so drained by the intensity of what I have just beheld that I'm ready to declare this World War II miniseries the finest piece of work ever produced for television. [7 Sept 2001, p.117]
    • New York Post
  100. Some of the best performances seen anywhere on TV. They're all so incredible that it seems unfair to single out some and not others, but if you watch Friday Night Lights, pay close attention to Chandler, Britton and Gilford; Taylor Kitsch as beer-swilling lothario Tim Riggins; Scott Porter as the wheelchair-bound former quarterback; Brad Leland as team booster Buddy Garrity (especially him); and Jesse Plemons and Adrianne Palicki as Landry and Tyra, the school's most unlikely couple (especially them too)...Everyone on Friday Night Lights deserves an Emmy. And true to form for this great unsung show, none of them were even nominated. [5 Oct 2007, p.133]
    • New York Post

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