New York Post's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 6,436 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Walk the Line
Lowest review score: 0 Hide Away
Score distribution:
6,436 movie reviews
  1. Lino Ventura is grand as a solemn resistance leader. He's backed by a knockout cast that includes Simone Signoret.
  2. Nothing this year comes close to being as utterly unforgettable as Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth, an extremely dark and disturbing fairy tale for audiences say, ages 12 and up.
  3. It is filmmaking as it should be but usually isn't.
  4. Well-meaning films like “Lincoln’’ and “Lee Daniels’ The Butler’’ merely scratch the surface compared to the deep and painful truths laid bare by 12 Years a Slave. It’s about time, Scarlett O’Hara.
  5. If there is a genius working in Hollywood today, it's animation director Brad Bird, who tops the delightful "The Incredibles" with arguably the finest 'toon in the Pixar canon, Ratatouille.
  6. Compared by some to “2001: A Space Odyssey,’’ Cuarón’s relatively intimate space epic is equally groundbreaking in the spectacular way it depicts space.
  7. Quite possibly the first truly great fact-based movie of the 21st century.
  8. Bursting with energy and originality even after 36 years, A Hard Day's Night is easily the best show in town.
  9. Like the fictional Clarice Starling in "The Silence of the Lambs,'' Maya is a consummate professional who brilliantly performs her job in an often hostile work environment.
  10. In the compelling but slow-moving Iranian film A Separation, a downbeat family drama of no particular distinction gradually turns into a mystery that raises painful moral questions. There may be several guilty parties.
  11. Making a movie this warm, funny, and rigorously truthful about lovers trying to remain partners is even harder.
  12. A Japanese cross between "Alice in Wonderland" and "The Wizard of Oz" -- is such a landmark in animation that labeling it a masterpiece almost seems inadequate.
  13. An all-time classic that seems even better after two decades.
  14. Stretched both timewise and for plausibility.
  15. A charming, hilarious robot love story aimed at the entire family.
  16. A sublime variation on the buddy road movie, infusing the midlife crises of the two main protagonists with hope and poetry.
  17. A majestic conclusion to a nine-plus-hours epic that stirs the heart, mind and soul as few films ever have.
  18. Carlos is exciting entertainment, even if its subject's two-decade reign of terror is reprehensible.
  19. All great films have imagination; this one also has the sense of experience.
  20. You have never seen a movie like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon because there has never been a movie like it.
  21. The Coens, so cutting to so many of their characters, are gentler with Llewyn, inviting us to wander and wonder along with him as he ponders why he must forever play the jerk.
  22. Presents an intelligent, profound and at times heartrending slice of Taiwanese middle-class existence - as seen by characters at different stages of life.
  23. You won't have a more viscerally emotional experience at the movies this year.
  24. The Class offers no Hollywood ending, but is rewarding for those up to the challenge.
  25. Denis -- who has called the film a tribute to the great Japanese director Yasujiro Ozu -- keeps dialogue to a minimum as she delicately examines how immigration is changing the face of France.
  26. Between D-Day, the sheer ambition of Paul Thomas Anderson's historical epic and Robert Elswit's dazzling cinematography, this is a must-see movie - even though its emotional temperature rarely rises above freezing and the climax goes way, way, way over the top.
  27. So consistently involving because the excellent cast delivers their lines with the kind of utter conviction not seen in this kind of movie since the first "Star Wars."
  28. While Tarr's newest epic, Werckmeister Harmonies, isn't intended for the shopping-mall crowd, it is more viewer-friendly and will please adventurous moviegoers.
  29. May not be a masterpiece, but it still had me in tears at the end.
  30. A groundbreaking, highly influential film, A Man Vanishes is a fiercely brilliant piece of work, but it's more intellectual challenge than pleasure.
  31. A rousing indictment of a barbaric practice.
  32. It is an important, thoroughly bewitching work of art.
  33. Chomet's wacky tale is so crammed full of eye-popping images, it's impossible to forget afterward.
  34. All hail the great Helen Mirren, who after her triumph in HBO's "Elizabeth," delivers the performance of a lifetime as that monarch's frumpy, 20th century namesake in Stephen Frear's witty, touching and engrossing The Queen.
  35. The various witnesses tell contradictory tales that turn this into a real-life “Rashomon." The fact that two of the principals — Sarah and Michael, who delivers touching and eloquent on-camera narration that he wrote himself — are accomplished actors adds another level of confusion and interest that help make this compelling storytelling.
  36. So minimalist in characterization and dialogue that the plot all but evaporates -- and so does any dramatic power.
  37. Haunting is the best word for Waltz With Bashir, a striking animated documentary - not an oxy moron, despite how it sounds - from Israel.
  38. The first movie I've seen in a very long while that deserves to be called a masterpiece. It's such a stunning achievement in storytelling.
  39. The filmmaker doesn't speculate about why these men are talking, but he leaves you with an excellent guess.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A film of such cyclonic visual and emotional power, of such dazzling virtuosity and shattering humanity, that it is difficult to endure, yet alone describe. Savagely beautiful and savagely true, Saving Private Ryan is an excruciating masterpiece.
  40. The main reason for Winter's Bone to exist is that it delivers a little voyeuristic thrill -- a bit of poverty porno -- for the critics who awarded it their highest honors at this year's Sundance Film Festival.
  41. The breathtaking visual and aural restoration by Coppola and Murch makes the film's original glories even more intense than you remember them.
  42. An astonishing re-creation of the Londonderry massacre of January 1972.
  43. Her
    Jonze seems to be heading for a far quirkier ending than the one he actually delivers, but he does tap into the zeitgeist with his unlikely romantic fable.
  44. Daring and unique, La Commune makes perfect viewing for the Fourth of July, which commemorates America's own revolution.
  45. Summer hasn't even started, but you won't likely find a better catch this season than Finding Nemo, a dazzling, computer-animated fish tale with a funny, touching script and wonderful voice performances that make it an unqualified treat for all ages.
  46. So there is courage and cheekiness here. What there is not is a story, or much insight or even anger; anyone expecting an indictment of Iran will be sorely disappointed.
  47. Revels in the sensual pleasure of music while capturing brilliantly the tension that grips any theater company before the curtain goes up.
  48. Being John Malkovich, which contains not a frame of extraneous footage, is more than a must-see movie: It's a must-see-more-than-once event.
  49. Chance encounters and fated love are the stuff of fairy tales, which is what makes the deliriously romantic sequel Before Sunset a small miracle.
  50. A spectacularly rendered tale of a family of superheroes, takes the art form to a whole new level.
  51. An unqualified triumph, the year's best movie so far.
  52. Davis, a hugely underrated actress..., is deadpan perfection as Joyce, wearing oversized glasses and a wig that makes her look like an older version of Thora Birch's character in "Ghost World."
  53. It ranks among Robert Altman's best work ever, and that its many satisfactions derive in large part from a superbly written screenplay by Julian Fellowes that has no equal this year.
  54. It's a long, brutal and honest look at a shattering event some Americans would apparently prefer not to see depicted - but also a respectful, inspiring one that's in no way exploitative or emotionally manipulative.
  55. An unforgettable and complex portrait of a nuclear family in meltdown.
  56. American Hustle is a movie that was built backward, or inside out: It puts actors’ needs before the audience’s. There’s no heart under those polyester lapels, and what all that Aqua Net is pasting together is a few sparse strands of wispy story.
  57. It is a vivid, at times heartbreaking, portrait of a life and a nation in crisis.
  58. The cumulative impact is devastating, and very far from a simple Western condemnation of another country’s brutality. In forcing viewers to hear the boasts of genocide’s perpetrators, The Act of Killing puts a harsh spotlight on all celebrations of bloodshed, from Hollywood to the op-ed pages.
  59. It's impossible to conceive of this ruefully funny entertainment without Bill Murray, who is nothing less than brilliant.
  60. All the pieces converge in a powerful rush during the second half.
  61. The skillfully acted and directed The Lives of Others is a timely warning about governments that seek to repress dissent.
  62. The movie equivalent of a 12-course feast crammed with unforgettable images and mind-boggling stunts.
  63. Engrossing and exhilarating documentary.
  64. Koreeda, talented director that he is, never allows the story to sink into soap-opera melodrama, and he refrains from pointing fingers.
  65. I can't wait to see Borat, which has twice as many laughs as all of this year's other movie comedies combined, for a fourth time.
  66. Some documentaries are a fervent search for truth; others are a fervent search for snickers. This one is the latter, providing via interviews and old film clips a Greatest Hits for Bush haters.
  67. The role of William is a perfect fit for Red West, a well-weathered member of Elvis Presley's Memphis Mafia who has served as a bodyguard as well as a stuntman and bit-part actor.
  68. Poetry, which rightfully won the best-screenplay prize at Cannes, never resorts to exploitation. Under Lee's guidence, it is a mature film for mature audiences.
  69. Literally the kind of movie they just don't make anymore, Michel Hazanavicius' French-sponsored charmer The Artist is a gorgeous black-and-white love letter to silent Hollywood with old-fashioned English intertitles and just a single line of audible (English) dialogue.
  70. Audacious, thought-provoking and ruefully funny.
  71. Taken together, Eastwood's masterworks - two of the best films of 2006 - may be Hollywood's last word on World War II.
  72. What "Rent" should have been, Once is: a Bohemian rhapsody.
  73. As hip, funny and truthful a sleeper as has ever flown under Tinseltown's radar.
  74. A remarkably assured feature debut by Bennett Miller, a longtime director of commercials (and the documentary "The Cruise") whose no-frills style trusts that the powerful material and the uniformly excellent performances need little embellishment.
  75. The acting and story are solid, but the real star of Tulpan is the gorgeous, never-ending landscape -- flat and arid, and home to camels, goats and lambs, and hearty people who live in tentlike yurts.
  76. Extremely unsettling and thought- provoking.
  77. Mostly a routine love story elevated by one of the year’s most magnetic performances.
  78. Looks great but moves like molasses, is more interesting than truly involving.
  79. Julie Christie is simply astounding as a woman slipping into the ravages of Alzheimer's in Sarah Polley's deeply affecting and artfully crafted Away From Her.
  80. Mafioso starts out as a comedy of manners before turning into a mob thriller that brings Nino to Bergen County, N.J. When he gets there, look for a man reading The Post on a street corner.
  81. Name names, please. Or shut up.
  82. The sequel's battle scenes -- especially the climactic assault on the Helm's Deep fortress by the armies of darkness -- easily put those of the "Star Wars" series to shame.
  83. It is not only an amazing technical accomplishment, it's also the wittiest and best-voiced animated movie to come along in years.
  84. Old-school filmmaking at its best.
  85. “GBH” is a featherweight screwball comedy that, trying mightily to be cosmopolitan, feels awfully provincial, desperately touristy.
  86. Up
    An exquisite work of cinematic art that also happens to be the funniest, most touching, most exciting and most entertaining movie released so far this year.
  87. Director Alfonso Cuaron ("A Little Princess") gets vivid, convincing performances from a fine cast, and generally keeps things going at a rapid pace.
  88. Toy Story had a simpler, stronger story and the advantage of being the first of its kind. But it's quickly apparent that TS2 represents a major step forward in computer-animation artistry.
  89. Kore-eda presents the deeply moving story in a documentary style that is both gentle and compelling.
  90. It's expertly directed in a low-key, naturalistic way that brings to mind French auteur Robert Bresson. It's also emotionally forceful and contains heartbreaking performances.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If she (Paltrow) were the only good thing about Shakespeare in Love, it still would have been worth seeing; that she is the crown jewel in a glittering tiara of a film studded with writing and acting gems testifies to the deep pleasures to be found in this remarkable movie.
  91. Panh’s technique achieves things a conventional documentary could not, as when he pans across dozens of the clay figures jumbled in a box, in a shot that calls up both the toys of childhood, and graves.
  92. The film's disclosure that Camorra money is involved with the reconstruction of New York City's Ground Zero will give viewers something to think about.
  93. If animated dogs were eligible for acting awards, the Oscar would go to Gromit.
  94. Nadezhda Markina is splendid as Elena, who speaks little but still manages to make her thoughts and emotions crystal clear.
  95. The film is still a gripping experience, though, with its circling sharks, its sun-dappled beauty and its agonies of shattered hope. At one point I was convinced that Sandra Bullock would splash down next to our man in her space capsule and Hanks’ Maersk ship from “Captain Phillips” would steam by to pick up both of them.
  96. More than a ripped-from-the- headlines drug drama, Maria Full of Grace is like a horror movie made real.
  97. Profound and majestic.
  98. An extraordinary documentary about an extraordinary man that brings to urgent life potentially dry questions of American foreign policy in the 1960s.

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