Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,318 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Entourage: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 862
  2. Negative: 0 out of 862
862 tv reviews
  1. Far, far, far and away NBC's best new pilot of the season and one of the best new shows of the season, on any network -- commercial or cable.
  2. Tonally, this often feels more like a psychological thriller than an action one, which is a very good sign. 24 is thinking, not just doing, and that bodes well for the later hours when our friend has tended to jump the tracks. All in all, a terrific start.
  3. The Beales' story--predictably, sadly--descends into mutual recrimination, then near madness. It's all rescued by two stunning performances.
  4. This show captures a distinct culture, and the people jockeying for places in it, trying to prove, mostly to themselves, that their lives have value. And so Friday Night Lights has more than almost any network show today. [5 Oct 2007, p.B33]
    • Newsday
  5. It is even better - if that is possible, and it is. Take my word. We are talking true comedic masterpieces here. [20 Jun 1994]
    • Newsday
  6. Breaking Bad is extraordinary, and if the rest of the season matches Sunday, an Emmy nomination for best drama seems certain.
  7. A winner. And for the Hoffmans' sake--plus family and friends along for the ride--let's hope there is gold in that hard, cold ground.
  8. As twisted, and twistedly funny, as ever.
  9. Soderbergh has created a vibrant, dark and above all alluring Gotham. Owen's Thackery is its bracing human counterpart.
  10. The most entertaining--and beautiful--new series on TV this fall.
  11. Entourage--at least in original episodes--has been off the air for one solid year, but when that title song from Jane's Addiction kicks in, it's like an old friend calling--only this time, the friend seems worthier, and his stories more interesting.
  12. [Producer John] Maggio has discovered the unfamiliar in something some of us thought was already familiar, and by doing so, does help dispel embedded stereotypes while enriching an already rich heritage.
  13. Who knew beautiful, obscenely expensive cars could be so much fun? These three guys do, and they effortlessly convey their knowledge and nutty passion.
    • Newsday
  14. Beautiful and often moving.
  15. Sunday and the next three episodes are superb while the rhythms and beats of the story are very nearly hypnotic. Nothing here feels wasteful or cheap.
  16. Homeland's fourth season feels as fresh, important and relevant as yesterday's news--or tomorrow's news. A bracing, intelligent start.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Probably the best comedy series on television. ... "The Larry Sanders Show" offers the sharpest of television's multitudinous media jokes while always remaining grounded as a comedy rooted in character. [16 Jul 1995]
    • Newsday
  17. Uniformly excellent - although some additional reporting devoted to the treatment of PTSD would have made this a more complete package.
  18. A critic for this paper once declared "The Wire" "the greatest dramatic series ever produced for television" and as the fourth season gets under way Sunday night, there's no reason to quibble with that assessment.
  19. Four immensely enjoyable hours. Alas, I can't speak to what happens during the remaining 20.
  20. Veep is the single most improved series on television.
  21. Six million zombiephiles watched the finale of the first season and those 6 million will not want to miss Sunday's opener, which is excellent and appropriately disgusting.
  22. As with his earlier shows, "Hopkins 24/7" (2000) and "Hopkins" (2008), Wrong has structured these stories masterfully. Nothing seems wasted, nothing is superfluous. As a result, the hugely important work these people do is honored in every shot.
  23. Lotsa fast banter and stylish direction will make some viewers dimly recall--as they are doubtlessly meant to--William Powell and Myrna Loy's late, great "Thin Man" movie series.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Housewives evolve. Yes, watch what happens, if only for the richer plot lines, smarter dialogue and more pressing matters of the day.
  24. It was last year, and remains so this year--one of TV's very best.
  25. What's here is pitch-perfect - the fear, loss, emotional devastation and, peculiar to this disease, silence.
  26. Sunday is a blast. Heads will roll, and roll well. The gore quotient is through the roof. And finally this guarantee--there is one, maybe even two, spots where you will yell out at the screen, "Oh, my God, that just didn't happen." Yes, the new season is that good.
  27. Fascinating and deeply troubling.
  28. Best show of the season? Call me crazy, but it's a loopy-twisted-serpentine whodunit revolving around a whip-smart teenage girl...So let's recap. Engaging star, cool characterizations, witty scripts, meaty backstory. What's not to like? Only that networks always cancel deliciously offbeat gems like this. Let's hope UPN doesn't actually want to be a "real" network, after all. [22 Sept 2004, p.C01]
    • Newsday
  29. It's just as good as I remembered. Even better, if that's possible. [8 Apr 1991]
    • Newsday
  30. The fuss is justified. Sunday's return of the Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss-created series is a triumphant one, and should easily establish Sherlock among TV's finest series.
  31. L.D. is back, and - based on viewing the first three episodes - his genius remains intact. [7 Sep 2007]
    • Newsday
  32. "Doctor, Doctor" can be hysterically, outrageously funny. [13 Jun 1991]
    • Newsday
  33. If there were an Emmy for most great moments per hour, "The Wire" would deserve it. [17 Sep 2004]
    • Newsday
  34. The show is sweet, gentle, sad around the edges. I really love it. [19 Sep 1991]
    • Newsday
  35. "Galactica" is so beautifully designed, shot, edited and acted that you can practically smell and taste its emotional validity.
  36. "I'll Fly Away" is a drama of substance, a big subject, a show about real people with great acting, great writing and strong emotion. [7 Oct 1991]
    • Newsday
  37. The hype is justified. Nashville's terrific.
  38. This show doesn't feel even remotely played out.
  39. Solid start to what could--and maybe should--be a future CW franchise.
  40. TV's best (but do your homework before diving in).
  41. With the mix of bizarre cases and believably goofy characters, I found already I never wanted the show to end. It's great stuff working on three levels at once. [17 Sep 1992]
    • Newsday
  42. Fabulous, a truly stunning grab-you-by-the-throat TV experience. [11 Feb 1993]
    • Newsday
  43. Another masterpiece of a thriller. [11 Feb 1993]
    • Newsday
  44. Even film school snobs like me can learn a thing or 10 from Moguls & Movie Stars. The breadth and depth of information rushing through each hour is astonishing.
  45. Funny, smart, entertaining, excellent acting and writing. What's not to like?
  46. Hip, clever and hilarious...A sparkling little character study, quirky comedy, relationship drama and all-around delight. [5 Oct 2000, p.B43]
    • Newsday
  47. A brilliantly written, funny triumph for Butler, who could become the new Roseanne. [30 Sep 1993]
    • Newsday
  48. One episode in, "Glee 2.0"--otherwise known as the fourth season--looks to be a winner.
  49. Anyone who enters this fantastic and beautifully realized play-scape--which remains ever so slightly ghoulish--will stick around. This is a winner.
  50. There's pleasure in every frame here--from terrific new cast additions (Molly Parker, David Glennon) to richer D.C. subplots. It all works, and it is all addictive.
  51. Party Down took awhile to jell, but it has hit its stride as one of TV's most finely observed comedies.
  52. It is so good, so unbelievable, I can't believe anything was that good on TV last year. And it's going to be even better this year, as it continues doing these shows about nothing. [16 Sep 1993]
    • Newsday
  53. The documentary cannily employs Goldberg's enthusiasm and some clever animations over Moms' audio routines to keep this lost legend's influence in the forefront.
  54. The show is doomed, knowing the Nielsen families' love of vapid, meaningless, unsocial comedy. But that shouldn't bother anybody interested in seeing how good and funny a rich, socially meaningful and useful comedy can be. [2 Sep 1993]
    • Newsday
  55. Humor is also key in the capacious pilot hour directed by John Madden ("Shakespeare in Love"). Subsequent episodes echo its deft balance of epic scope and whimsical humanity.
  56. There are three excellent reasons--Milch, Mann and Hoffman--why your faith will be rewarded.
  57. Holzman's writing is brilliant. [25 Aug 1994]
    • Newsday
  58. It's smartly written; clinically interesting (Why is Tara this way?), and maybe even a metaphor for the challenges all women face.
  59. A socially responsible, heartwarming, beautifully made, written and acted series. [8 Sep 1994]
    • Newsday
  60. The best new show of the year. [28 Dec 1994]
    • Newsday
  61. An enthralling film.
  62. Gorgeously acted, written, paced, structured and conceived, "Damages" remains one of the best shows on TV--and maybe the most enjoyably addictive.
  63. For a show forever detonating bombs, it's surprising how sweet and frothy Tara feels. Just a half-hour long, it doesn't waste a second, pulling a gun within the first few and no punches ever.
  64. This remains one of the best shows on TV, and (as usual) not for all tastes.
  65. The first case in this innovative series is terrific. [18 Sep 1995]
    • Newsday
  66. The writers have great ears for "real" dialogue, and, in fact, not a single line here feels like a dead ball. The characters, too, arrive fully formed and believable. First impressions are absolutely vital in TV, and The Middle makes an excellent one.
  67. The horror is carefully and strategically placed; one mustn't have too much of a good thing, after all.... So settle in. You will be grossed out.
  68. Lavisly illustrated with archival footage, much of it rare, The March makes it almost easy to forget that words--not to mention the one man who said them--were the real stars that day.... Excellent, exhaustive.
  69. In the third season, the song remains the same. Biblical themes of fathers and sons, fathers and daughters, honor and dishonor, Cain and Abel are all baked under that pitiless California sun. Brace yourselves.
  70. Disturbing. Magnetic. Hold your breath. Watch.
  71. Who else but Larry David could have imagined that a "Curb" largely without the glorious Cheryl Hines could conceivably be funnier? Or that her absence might work as a comedic plot foil for one of its major story arcs? He did, and that's genius.
  72. This is TV's best comedy. And there's nothing in the first two episodes that would suggest otherwise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    My pregnant friends polish up the hand-me-downs, shop for the rest of their gear at Target and worry to death about how to make ends meet when it comes to child care. They know what to name their offspring. That's what makes this new Bravo show exploiting the rich all the more fascinating.
  73. Stunning, beautiful, hypnotic, engrossing, spectacular... That oughta do it here as well, except Frozen Planet unexpectedly adds another word: Unprecedented.
  74. How could you possibly go wrong with these two? You couldn't.
  75. Whether it's Brent's starry-eyed foppishness, Dawn's artistic daydreams or Gareth's organizational stiffness, these are characters we don't see on American TV. They're not accomplished, clever or distinctive. But they're so well-observed, and so subtly personified, that it's as if we're finding amusement in people we know. [21 Oct 2004]
    • Newsday
  76. Here's to a long and fruitful run in the new home. Tuesday night proves exactly why Southland deserves one.
  77. It's homage of the highest form, but comedy of the highest form, too. Cos quite obviously is far from finished.
  78. Marry Me is the rarest of commercial TV sitcoms in that it's actually funny, has two standout leads and a superb supporting cast (especially Meadows and Bucatinsky).
  79. This teacher can be loquacious--oh yeah--but he's got a big heart, too. Danza, Northeast and A&E deserve credit for this series.
  80. Bracing and tasty.
  81. Nice to finally see a show nailing what it wants to be and say, in continually discerning work from Passmore, Szostak and series creator Sean Jablonski.
  82. Sincere host, unguarded participants, sensitive treatment. And more cool stuff!
  83. A head-spinning, yet deeply humane, thrill ride.
  84. Falco, Eve Best (Ellie O'Hara) and Anna Deavere Smith (Gloria Akalitus) are flawless, and... very amusing.
  85. It's less the Plot Events that ring true here than the well-played little side moments and background squabbles, the simmering resentments and recriminations, the emotional tugs-of-war.
  86. Of course there are dozens of loose ends in need of tying, but you do get the sense that some will actually get tied, and in a satisfying way.
  87. No matter where you stand on the death-penalty debate, this is must-watch revelation--and, thanks to Herzog, tense and suspenseful drama.
  88. The Gus Vant Sant-directed pilot of what is easily the most important project in Starz history pulses with the sort of corruption that absolute power sires.
  89. You can see Neverland as sly philosophical discourse, or you can see it as fantastically produced adventure. Just make sure you see it.
  90. Grim, but a chance to see two magnificent actors at the peak of their powers.
  91. The Assets isn't flashy, but boy, is it effective. It just grinds away, laying down intriguing details of "asset" care and feeding, made vivid through determined performances and intense crescendos.
  92. This remains a superior TV drama.
  93. The show's core relationship is appealingly relaxed. It dares to suggest successful coupledom lies less in heated passion than in being able to dress down and screw up and know you're still loved.
  94. Based on most of the first five episodes sent out for review, Boardwalk Empire easily establishes its claim as one of the three or four best dramas on TV.
  95. A winner and best of all, fun.
  96. If you loved last season, there's nothing so far to indicate you won't like the second just as much.
  97. Browncoats Unite keeps the focus on the work itself. And that's what keeps "Firefly" afloat.

Top Trailers