Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,236 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 The Choice: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 800
  2. Negative: 0 out of 800
800 tv reviews
  1. Nobody tries to be funny here, so they're more hysterical than the folks falling all over themselves elsewhere. They're simply hopeless specimens of spoiled humanity who haven't a clue how to operate in the real world. [2 Nov 2003, p.04]
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  2. 'Flying Blind' is the one gem that stands out in the Fox lineup. The first show takes off like a jet. And the second show is even better. If it's against your religion to watch Fox, this one is worth straying for. [10 Sep 1992]
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  3. Hip, clever and hilarious...A sparkling little character study, quirky comedy, relationship drama and all-around delight. [5 Oct 2000, p.B43]
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  4. The show is well-conceived, well-written and very funny. [16 Sep 1991]
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  5. L.D. is back, and - based on viewing the first three episodes - his genius remains intact. [7 Sep 2007]
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  6. Every character bursts with life here, in what may be the most fully realized show on TV. [13 Aug 2007]
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  7. The show is fast-paced, crackling, choreographed like a comedy ballet. [20 Sep 1992]
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  8. A work of TV art. ... It's a major, major series - a masterpiece, with great characters. The writing is textured, deep, rich. [26 Apr 1988]
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  9. Had something special about it from the start: the mood, the writing, the acting. All the great series establish a mis-en-scene, a special environment that you can cut with a knife. I felt I was in a different place watching "Wiseguy." [30 May 1988]
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  10. This second season has been marvelous. Now it's absolutely brilliant. [27 Nov 1989]
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  11. It's stunning for a TV mystery. It's actually mysterious. The mood, the characters, the surreal quality of how the story is told, are something different. It has a slow hypnotic movement, a style like a boxer in slo-mo. It hit me with tremendous energy and made me abandon despair at the state of TV mysteries. [5 Apr 1990]
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  12. It's just as good as I remembered. Even better, if that's possible. [8 Apr 1991]
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  13. The show is sweet, gentle, sad around the edges. I really love it. [19 Sep 1991]
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  14. "I'll Fly Away" is a drama of substance, a big subject, a show about real people with great acting, great writing and strong emotion. [7 Oct 1991]
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  15. With the mix of bizarre cases and believably goofy characters, I found already I never wanted the show to end. It's great stuff working on three levels at once. [17 Sep 1992]
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  16. The best new show of the year. [28 Dec 1994]
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  17. The first case in this innovative series is terrific. [18 Sep 1995]
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  18. It is even better - if that is possible, and it is. Take my word. We are talking true comedic masterpieces here. [20 Jun 1994]
    • Newsday
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Probably the best comedy series on television. ... "The Larry Sanders Show" offers the sharpest of television's multitudinous media jokes while always remaining grounded as a comedy rooted in character. [16 Jul 1995]
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  19. If there were an Emmy for most great moments per hour, "The Wire" would deserve it. [17 Sep 2004]
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  20. Watching the first couple of episodes once again I am marveling at how good the show really is. [16 Jan 2000]
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  21. Whether it's Brent's starry-eyed foppishness, Dawn's artistic daydreams or Gareth's organizational stiffness, these are characters we don't see on American TV. They're not accomplished, clever or distinctive. But they're so well-observed, and so subtly personified, that it's as if we're finding amusement in people we know. [21 Oct 2004]
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  22. Owner's Manual looks as sharp as you'd expect from cinematic-minded AMC -- whip-pans, slo-mo, montage, animations, infographics. Sounds great, too, with heart-pumping action music and industrial power sounds. Best of all, homework-doer Marcus (aka Sweet Cheeks) and scoffer Ed (or is that English Muffin?) are natural bicker-buds throughout, adding life and laughs to each half-hour that flies (or rolls) by.
  23. Lavisly illustrated with archival footage, much of it rare, The March makes it almost easy to forget that words--not to mention the one man who said them--were the real stars that day.... Excellent, exhaustive.
  24. It's hilarious, and sad, and ironic, and rich.
  25. As with "The Avengers," Whedon's ear and sensibilities match the material perfectly.
  26. Humor is also key in the capacious pilot hour directed by John Madden ("Shakespeare in Love"). Subsequent episodes echo its deft balance of epic scope and whimsical humanity.
  27. This show captures a distinct culture, and the people jockeying for places in it, trying to prove, mostly to themselves, that their lives have value. And so Friday Night Lights has more than almost any network show today. [5 Oct 2007, p.B33]
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  28. Disgusting--but in a good way.
  29. Excellent actors playing excellent actors--and largely succeeding.
  30. Not a single minute seems superfluous. This is all-engrossing, and all-informative.
  31. The documentary cannily employs Goldberg's enthusiasm and some clever animations over Moms' audio routines to keep this lost legend's influence in the forefront.
  32. It's homage of the highest form, but comedy of the highest form, too. Cos quite obviously is far from finished.
  33. Its tender moments register without feeling forced while the comedy comes in the form of a constant IV drip.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Riveting, important and lots of fun.
  34. About as good a Community restart as anyone could have possible hoped for.
  35. The fuss is justified. Sunday's return of the Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss-created series is a triumphant one, and should easily establish Sherlock among TV's finest series.
  36. They know how to nail situations/characters, while snappy edits cull fluff, leaving only comic gold.
  37. There's pleasure in every frame here--from terrific new cast additions (Molly Parker, David Glennon) to richer D.C. subplots. It all works, and it is all addictive.
  38. Disturbing. Magnetic. Hold your breath. Watch.
  39. Still TV's best--dive in while the water's warm.
  40. Judge has a keen eye for the absurdities of human behavior and speech, but he's not the kind of guy to waste that on subtle inside jokes or wordplay. He's not someone to waste it on farce, either: Silicon Valley also happens to be sly and smart.
  41. This still very much feels like a journey worth taking if only because--in the process--Hamm deftly continues to locate some heroic facet in TV's reigning anti-hero.
  42. Louie very much remains Louie in the best sense.
  43. The opener is absolutely superlative--a thing of real beauty, even elegance.... Berry delivers a performance that's surprisingly layered and nuanced.
  44. All charm and smarts, the best new NBC comedy in a long time. A winner.
  45. Better, richer, more compelling than season one.
  46. The horror is carefully and strategically placed; one mustn't have too much of a good thing, after all.... So settle in. You will be grossed out.
  47. Fascinating and deeply troubling.
  48. Soderbergh has created a vibrant, dark and above all alluring Gotham. Owen's Thackery is its bracing human counterpart.
  49. The end begins--evocatively, dramatically.
  50. Burns and Ward pile on so much detail, alongside so much stunning footage, that by watching this whole spread--to borrow that famous and also well-rubbed line -- will be like arriving "where we started and know the place for the first time." Magnificent. Of course.
  51. This indisputably is Amazon Prime's “Orange Is the New Black.” That--believe me--is praise enough.
  52. It's wonderful stuff, and we all seem to be on a voyage of discovery.
  53. This show was always best when handling the little things that aim to capture life, and often do.
  54. Mad Men, as ever, remains a solid and beautifully produced TV program. Best of all, this episode promises a compelling third season. Fans will find much to savor.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    If you loved it before, you'll love it again. "Auf"-ully good.
  55. Community can be fresh, funny, smart and extremely aware of its own cleverness; it also can be terrifically odd--odd good, or odd bad, or sometimes odd-good-bad-strange all at once.
  56. Pleasurable, amusing, well conceived and written, though perhaps just a little shy on character development (New York excepted). Give this one time - these guys feel like they're worth getting to know, and the show as well.
  57. Garcia's single-camera editing amplifies the comedy inherent, rather than being a crutch to create it. And the casting here is as good as "Earl," which is saying something--even if Leachman goes a bit off the rails as wacked-out "mamaw."
  58. This teacher can be loquacious--oh yeah--but he's got a big heart, too. Danza, Northeast and A&E deserve credit for this series.
  59. Still smart, still good, still fun, Human Target remains one of TV's best comic books.
  60. A particularly fine new FX drama marred only by a tepid pace in the pilot. But pace and story pick up in subsequent episodes.
  61. Of course there are dozens of loose ends in need of tying, but you do get the sense that some will actually get tied, and in a satisfying way.
  62. Grim, but a chance to see two magnificent actors at the peak of their powers.
  63. Producer Beers' team is the gold standard in male-aimed reality, and these guys have grit to burn.
  64. Smart new cop show that takes time to build, but will reward patience.
  65. I mostly loved Game of Thrones, but occasionally grew a little weary of it as well. (And just to answer the obvious question, this is not a small-screen "Lord of the Rings.")
  66. With two shopping trips in each half-hour, TLC's latest hit is so fast-paced--and such giddy consumerism--that it's fairly irresistible. Also educational.
  67. A winner and best of all, fun.
  68. Still funny and still not for everyone. Louie remains very much a taste that you either acquire--or don't.
  69. The soul of the show, though, is its conflicted "heroes," truly tortured, in palpable ways, recalling the best, early days of NBC's ill-fated Monday comic book. There's no cartoonery here. Just adult adventure and angst.
  70. This evocative hour doesn't lionize Steinem, but simply lays out what happened.
  71. Fascinating documentary--and extremely effective commercial.
  72. Unforgettable was on no one's list as one of the "buzzier" fall pilots, but that doesn't mean it's not one of the better ones. It is.
  73. The show's core relationship is appealingly relaxed. It dares to suggest successful coupledom lies less in heated passion than in being able to dress down and screw up and know you're still loved.
  74. A gorgeous production, though the story sometimes keeps it on the tarmac.
  75. The Gus Vant Sant-directed pilot of what is easily the most important project in Starz history pulses with the sort of corruption that absolute power sires.
  76. It all adds up to one solid nail-biter, with a profusion of clever clues that seems to cast suspicion on everyone.
  77. You can see Neverland as sly philosophical discourse, or you can see it as fantastically produced adventure. Just make sure you see it.
  78. Much grimmer, grayer and (gasp) dowdier. Still mostly wonderful.
  79. A bit melodramatic, a bit manipulative, Touch is still one of the best pilots of the 2011-12 season to date.
  80. Yup, the story can be downbeat, the pace at times languid. But this is a show with a brain and a heart.
  81. No matter where you stand on the death-penalty debate, this is must-watch revelation--and, thanks to Herzog, tense and suspenseful drama.
  82. Falco, Eve Best (Ellie O'Hara) and Anna Deavere Smith (Gloria Akalitus) are flawless, and... very amusing.
  83. They honor the job without trivializing it, or turning it into melodramatic entertainment pap for the masses.
  84. Extremely funny and extremely raunchy (consider yourself warned), but Dunham's a major talent.
  85. [These women make] instant impact, of course, with their stories but also through sheer personality.
  86. Strong personalities evoke the hold of the old, the tug of the new, and that intersection's human fireworks.
  87. Bracing and tasty.
  88. No relaxing allowed with Boss. Sorry about that, and sorry for this series, which remains smart, absorbing and particularly well done.
  89. Sincere host, unguarded participants, sensitive treatment. And more cool stuff!
  90. It's less the Plot Events that ring true here than the well-played little side moments and background squabbles, the simmering resentments and recriminations, the emotional tugs-of-war.
  91. The results so far are very (very) funny.
  92. Browncoats Unite keeps the focus on the work itself. And that's what keeps "Firefly" afloat.
  93. Smart newcomer with a pair of leads that turns The Americans into a likely winner.
  94. Monday Mornings is Kelleyesque in all the best and admittedly worst--melodramatic, manipulative, shocking--ways. But it's also intelligent, particularly well-written and acted, and above all interested in matters other than what's directly mounted on the screen before your eyes, most notably ethics, human nature and human fallibility.
  95. Still defiantly Community, still good and still uninterested in adding new viewers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's not a bit hokey, as are many reality show competitions. Unlike "ANTM," the coaches don't judge. Instead, they leave that to industry experts who are authentic: smart, tough and unemotional.
  96. A head-spinning, yet deeply humane, thrill ride.

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