Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,602 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 United States of Tara: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Murphy's Law (1988): Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1059
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1059
1059 tv reviews
  1. Lavisly illustrated with archival footage, much of it rare, The March makes it almost easy to forget that words--not to mention the one man who said them--were the real stars that day.... Excellent, exhaustive.
  2. In the third season, the song remains the same. Biblical themes of fathers and sons, fathers and daughters, honor and dishonor, Cain and Abel are all baked under that pitiless California sun. Brace yourselves.
  3. A warm, welcome and even moving return. Best of all, a reflective one.
  4. Excellent, balanced, powerful, engaging, comprehensive perspective on the “trial of the century” and race. The first two parts are best.
  5. A Year in the Life is a triumph. ... A sweet, sad, sentimental and (above all) joyous return to Stars Hollow.
  6. Disturbing. Magnetic. Hold your breath. Watch.
  7. There are lots of other small touches--or technical flourishes--along with new cast members, notably Nina. Otherwise, best of luck finding anything radically different because there isn’t all that much that’s changed.... This is a “win-win”--for HBO, public TV, its most iconic series and those kids.
  8. Who else but Larry David could have imagined that a "Curb" largely without the glorious Cheryl Hines could conceivably be funnier? Or that her absence might work as a comedic plot foil for one of its major story arcs? He did, and that's genius.
  9. This is TV's best comedy. And there's nothing in the first two episodes that would suggest otherwise.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    My pregnant friends polish up the hand-me-downs, shop for the rest of their gear at Target and worry to death about how to make ends meet when it comes to child care. They know what to name their offspring. That's what makes this new Bravo show exploiting the rich all the more fascinating.
  10. Stunning, beautiful, hypnotic, engrossing, spectacular... That oughta do it here as well, except Frozen Planet unexpectedly adds another word: Unprecedented.
  11. Prepare to reattach those jaws once again. Spectacular. What else?
  12. How could you possibly go wrong with these two? You couldn't.
  13. Whether it's Brent's starry-eyed foppishness, Dawn's artistic daydreams or Gareth's organizational stiffness, these are characters we don't see on American TV. They're not accomplished, clever or distinctive. But they're so well-observed, and so subtly personified, that it's as if we're finding amusement in people we know. [21 Oct 2004]
    • Newsday
  14. Here's to a long and fruitful run in the new home. Tuesday night proves exactly why Southland deserves one.
  15. It's homage of the highest form, but comedy of the highest form, too. Cos quite obviously is far from finished.
  16. Marry Me is the rarest of commercial TV sitcoms in that it's actually funny, has two standout leads and a superb supporting cast (especially Meadows and Bucatinsky).
  17. [The] tightly crafted pilot abjures the urge to make its own judgments on good/evil, sanity/delusion, isolation/connection, conscience/capitulation.
  18. Baskets builds into a character-study treasure, much like FX precursor “Louie.”
  19. This teacher can be loquacious--oh yeah--but he's got a big heart, too. Danza, Northeast and A&E deserve credit for this series.
  20. Bracing and tasty.
  21. Nice to finally see a show nailing what it wants to be and say, in continually discerning work from Passmore, Szostak and series creator Sean Jablonski.
  22. If all this sounds heady, pretentious or derivative, then Westworld may eventually turn out to be guilty as charged. But from at least from the first two episodes sampled, Westworld is also a genuinely different new series that offers something even better than that: It’s genuinely engaging.
  23. Sincere host, unguarded participants, sensitive treatment. And more cool stuff!
  24. From the setup to the incidentals, People of Earth is packed with humor and heart forever revealed in clever ways.
  25. A head-spinning, yet deeply humane, thrill ride.
  26. Falco, Eve Best (Ellie O'Hara) and Anna Deavere Smith (Gloria Akalitus) are flawless, and... very amusing.
  27. Like Seinfeld, Carmichael’s humor is sometimes about locating what’s funny in our narcissism, or his. But this episode wouldn’t work as well as it does if there wasn’t a moral, wrapped in a truth.
  28. It's less the Plot Events that ring true here than the well-played little side moments and background squabbles, the simmering resentments and recriminations, the emotional tugs-of-war.
  29. Of course there are dozens of loose ends in need of tying, but you do get the sense that some will actually get tied, and in a satisfying way.
  30. Yes, it can be mean, and yes, superficial, and yes, a little draggy (almost a whole episode about a kids’ party, really?). But the cast is fabulous, and the script by Kelley sparkles. A winner.
  31. No matter where you stand on the death-penalty debate, this is must-watch revelation--and, thanks to Herzog, tense and suspenseful drama.
  32. Based on the first six episodes of the 4th season, OITNB remains fresh, funny/sad, smart, inventive, well-written, and particularly well-acted.
  33. The Gus Vant Sant-directed pilot of what is easily the most important project in Starz history pulses with the sort of corruption that absolute power sires.
  34. You can see Neverland as sly philosophical discourse, or you can see it as fantastically produced adventure. Just make sure you see it.
  35. It’s easy enough for new viewers to join this Emmy-nominated gem, as its third season reshuffles everyone’s deck at least once.
  36. Grim, but a chance to see two magnificent actors at the peak of their powers.
  37. The Assets isn't flashy, but boy, is it effective. It just grinds away, laying down intriguing details of "asset" care and feeding, made vivid through determined performances and intense crescendos.
  38. This remains a superior TV drama.
  39. The show's core relationship is appealingly relaxed. It dares to suggest successful coupledom lies less in heated passion than in being able to dress down and screw up and know you're still loved.
  40. Based on most of the first five episodes sent out for review, Boardwalk Empire easily establishes its claim as one of the three or four best dramas on TV.
  41. A winner and best of all, fun.
  42. If you loved last season, there's nothing so far to indicate you won't like the second just as much.
  43. Browncoats Unite keeps the focus on the work itself. And that's what keeps "Firefly" afloat.
  44. Sunday's episode is exceptional, marred only in a few spots by padding that's inevitable with these supersized episodes.
  45. In the three episodes Comedy Central offered for review, most of the sketches work, some don't. But the best of the lot is next week.... just might be that breakout season.
  46. The Red Road demands patience, but from what I've seen, it strongly suggests that will be rewarded.
  47. The Slap is a chance, and a worthy one, too.
  48. The real le Carré unreels here, with savvy updates (re-gendering the book’s male spy boss) strengthening his nail-biting storytelling and ever keen focus on the toxic bureaucracy behind even the most opulent intrigue.
  49. A particularly fine new FX drama marred only by a tepid pace in the pilot. But pace and story pick up in subsequent episodes.
  50. This is far more than a generous compilation but a two-hour fast-cut that attempts to reassemble a fractured mind from its own filings.
  51. Fans will be happy, but you newbies have been warned--the vulgarity will blow your hair back, or right off.
  52. Unforgettable was on no one's list as one of the "buzzier" fall pilots, but that doesn't mean it's not one of the better ones. It is.
  53. Crisis ultimately gets its priorities straight by giving viewers a reason to care--about the characters, outcome and mystery.
  54. Much grimmer, grayer and (gasp) dowdier. Still mostly wonderful.
  55. Their [John Brownlow and co-writer Don Macpherson's] saga is so vividly shaded, even minor characters resonate.
  56. Finding Carter isn't some teen show. It's a stellar drama.
  57. Morals is raw, interesting, intelligent, sometimes funny (sometimes not), violent (but not overly violent) and unlike anything on TV at the moment.
  58. With two shopping trips in each half-hour, TLC's latest hit is so fast-paced--and such giddy consumerism--that it's fairly irresistible. Also educational.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's not a bit hokey, as are many reality show competitions. Unlike "ANTM," the coaches don't judge. Instead, they leave that to industry experts who are authentic: smart, tough and unemotional.
  59. I mostly loved Game of Thrones, but occasionally grew a little weary of it as well. (And just to answer the obvious question, this is not a small-screen "Lord of the Rings.")
  60. The series actually improves on the movie. This is consistently funnier, weirder and more inventive.
  61. Can a bad person become a good president? The answer may be self-evident--or maybe not. Nevertheless, therein lies a compelling new season. We may still have a lot more to learn about Frank Underwood after all.
  62. Fascinating documentary--and extremely effective commercial.
  63. A gorgeous production, though the story sometimes keeps it on the tarmac.
  64. The series never quite convincingly establishes what could have been a powerful undercurrent-- whether Naz and by association the rest of New York’s Muslim community had been tried and convicted based on their Muslim faith alone. That’s OK. Everything else--and everyone else--cclicks just about perfectly.
  65. Still smart, still good, still fun, Human Target remains one of TV's best comic books.
  66. She’s a terrific and effortlessly funny actress who establishes vivid characters with vivid lives. But Sam Fox obviously required a bigger reach, and Adlon accomplishes that here.
  67. The Millers shows what a thing of glory hear-the-laughs sitcomedy can be in the hands of masters.
  68. Complaining about the show's pre-fab structure is like shootin' fish in a barrel--no point to ask what's-the-point, no fair to ponder whether it's fair, because you end up with dinner anyhow, and folks gonna gobble it. Duck Dynasty is tasty enough.
  69. Community can be fresh, funny, smart and extremely aware of its own cleverness; it also can be terrifically odd--odd good, or odd bad, or sometimes odd-good-bad-strange all at once.
  70. What worked especially well last season also gets better in the second.
  71. Still excellent, still hard to love.
  72. Garcia's single-camera editing amplifies the comedy inherent, rather than being a crutch to create it. And the casting here is as good as "Earl," which is saying something--even if Leachman goes a bit off the rails as wacked-out "mamaw."
  73. Amid all those speeches, there's beauty, passion, heart and brains in The Newsroom. There's also humor, even more than ever in Sunday's opener.
  74. Good, crackling start that--as the old saying goes--changes everything and may even point to the end.
  75. Yup, the story can be downbeat, the pace at times languid. But this is a show with a brain and a heart.
  76. It's like "M*A*S*H" with just the helicopters showing up and no laughs. "E.R." is all trauma; you never get to know enough about the patients or get involved with them. It's just treat, release and move on. [18 Sep 1994]
    • Newsday
  77. [Bill Lawrence] scores again here, with an instantly appealing ensemble, from Astin's "soulless upstairs tool" to Rory Scovel as the downstairs dude from "a very competitive community college.
  78. Still defiantly Community, still good and still uninterested in adding new viewers.
  79. Black Box creates compelling people while smartly pondering identity, relationships, connection--it doesn't need the amped-up atmosphere.
  80. The complex impact of the crime--and of its investigation, news coverage and town reaction--is the real story here, laid out in the decidedly ordinary faces and raw silent spaces that British drama delivers so well.
  81. The cast succeeds, and in the end, so does Heart.
  82. Strong personalities evoke the hold of the old, the tug of the new, and that intersection's human fireworks.
  83. Mad Men, as ever, remains a solid and beautifully produced TV program. Best of all, this episode promises a compelling third season. Fans will find much to savor.
  84. With [Mike O'Malley's] fluid scripts, these sharp actors hit not just three-pointers but also free throws.
  85. Pleasurable, amusing, well conceived and written, though perhaps just a little shy on character development (New York excepted). Give this one time - these guys feel like they're worth getting to know, and the show as well.
  86. This is a singular vision throughout, written and directed by the team of Lodge Kerrigan and Amy Seimetz. (She also plays Christine’s older sister.) Their intense focus draws a disquieting portrait of a peculiar personality.
  87. The characters in "Hope" are slightly more interesting [than those in "ER"]. Even though they are working in a high-powered hospital and have God-like powers, you can see what's going on behind their masks beyond their eyes. [18 Sep 1994]
    • Newsday
  88. [A] strongly acted thriller, which seems to add another intense dimension weekly.
  89. Monday Mornings is Kelleyesque in all the best and admittedly worst--melodramatic, manipulative, shocking--ways. But it's also intelligent, particularly well-written and acted, and above all interested in matters other than what's directly mounted on the screen before your eyes, most notably ethics, human nature and human fallibility.
  90. [These women make] instant impact, of course, with their stories but also through sheer personality.
  91. There's humor, there's heart, you'll laugh when you don't expect to.
  92. The results so far are very (very) funny.
  93. Parks and Rec remains funny, sharp and inventive.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    If you loved it before, you'll love it again. "Auf"-ully good.
  94. All the Way gets a couple of electrifying performances that catalyze the drama--not to mention the forward momentum of history. They’re brief, but they do the job. ... Magnificent, often stirring performance by Cranston that no one else comes close to matching.
  95. Producer Beers' team is the gold standard in male-aimed reality, and these guys have grit to burn.
  96. We ultimately get to spend time with Henson's judges hashing it out. That brings insight into what makes things work, into creature logic, proportions, movement, performance facilitation, and letting the creation "emote through its environment." We don't just watch art being made, we come to understand the process.
  97. The soul of the show, though, is its conflicted "heroes," truly tortured, in palpable ways, recalling the best, early days of NBC's ill-fated Monday comic book. There's no cartoonery here. Just adult adventure and angst.

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