Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,310 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Zombie Apocalypse
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 855
  2. Negative: 0 out of 855
855 tv reviews
  1. It's a cut above boilerplate, with good production values and decent performances.
  2. Way too obscure for the average viewer, Comic Book Men is strictly for Smith groupies, and there are probably enough of those to keep this six-parter afloat over its short run.
  3. The Narrative knot is further jumbled by all the head games Two plays on him and everyone else. Six is on shifting sand, and so, too, will you be.
  4. A by-the-book cop show without much bite or heft. But it's got Memphis and Lee.
  5. There's too much going on to tell what might ultimately stick, other than the contents of the Mallow Marsh.
  6. The show is scattered, slight and abominably self-promotional. But Michaels is so full of abundant - and infectious - good cheer that you tend to overlook these many faults. Fans will eat it up.
  7. It's an exhaustive and exhausting film, but Garbus finds nothing that will change minds or reverse conclusions. The tragic void remains.
  8. Bonnie & Clyde really is just another biopic with superior production values, a few good performances and a pair of protagonists who deserve no sympathy, and receive none here.
  9. Not great, not terrible--just your standard-issue TV movie about a well-known historic event.
  10. Interesting detours, and a worthy show--but at times just a smidgen too self-righteous and melodramatic.
  11. There's so much to like here. Now, all P&R has to do is become consistently likable.
  12. Pauly is still Pauly--but he's a more grown-up version who cares about his friends, ailing dad and career.
  13. At least Emily proves she's got the chops to cast a shadow of her own.
  14. Stellar production, famous leads. What's missing? Heart.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The cameos often are amusing, and so is Kudrow, but someone at Showtime evidently forgot to ask whether a one-joke webisode can or should be expanded into a one-joke TV series. This one feels like a strrrretch.
  15. I laughed. Not often, or perhaps not often enough, but there was also enough McFarlane-esque gross-out sophomoric tomfoolery to keep even me reasonably entertained for a half-hour. Plus, good ol' likable Cleveland works well as a leading man.
  16. It's summer, expectations are low, and you could do a lot worse than this genial, softhearted import.
  17. The angel on my shoulder says H8R is a piece of slime, bringing out the worst in everyone involved. But the devil on my other shoulder says this show is the logical outcome of our culture's celeb-obsession, and everyone involved gets precisely what they deserve. Which is soooo fun to watch.
  18. The pilot is so busy establishing its new world, performances are afterthought generic. But Defiance gets more distinctive, and dramatic, through its next two hour episodes.
  19. Mostly boilerplate teen soap that lacks the (umm) zest of "Sex and the City"--a good thing, in case you're wondering.
  20. This is a thoughtful, dutiful historic drama filled with all the requisite period details and British accents, too. But what's missing here, glaringly so, are passion and sweep .
  21. The performance tends to be monochromatic, and in the end, so is Mildred Pierce. What's especially enjoyable here are the minor performances--especially Pearce as the louche Monty--and the many almost imperceptibly small details, right down to the crockery in a restaurant.
  22. Garcia is a major-league cutie and sunny on-screen presence without being cloying. But enough with the filthy-rich-kid dramedies!
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Sure, it's a glossy, well-produced infomercial filled with powerful live performances, but it feels designed to make us want to buy more Beyoncé stuff.
  23. Competent spinoff, but the formula tends to wear like a straitjacket on Whitaker.
  24. The time allotted isn't long enough to truly convey the touchstones a sci-fi devotee might demand. But with so much skated through, it's plenty to confuse a newbie.
  25. Falco is very good, always is, but her show has gotten tired.
  26. Thurgood feels more "important" than dramatic. Part of it is Stevens' then-I-did-this structure, more focused on biographical bullet points than the flesh-and-blood human behind them. And part of it is Fishburne, who despite coiled power--his Ike Turner in "What's Love Got to Do With It" was Oscar-nominated--resonates here as a cool character rather than a fiery one.
  27. A not-bad formula gothic that'll rise or fall on the Dekker/Robertson chemistry; I'm betting on the former.
  28. The feel is more documentary than "reality" show, which some viewers will appreciate and others won't.
  29. At first, the pace is slow--make that glacial--but [the] pilot episode (and especially Sunjata) are good-natured enough to make you want to stick around to see if this gels into anything approaching an FX drama (it does not).
  30. A not-unpleasing comedy that takes time and commitment to grow on you. How long? I started to like it three or four episodes in. Seems like an awfully long time, no?
  31. Respectable, incomplete survey (on TV) Thursday night, but future installments look better.
  32. Amusing, dumb, silly--exactly what you'd expect.
  33. Will a cheerfully biased newcomer with a few amusing, well-crafted one-liners be enough to get FX on the boards in late night? To paraphrase Yoda, difficult to say--always in motion is the future--but Rock may want to light a fire under this act sooner than later.
  34. Hilarious implausibility, overheated dialogue and enough soap to do several loads of laundry are part of its appeal.
  35. While True Blood remains wildly and bloodily inventive--and will certainly remain a huge HBO hit--there's still an overwhelming sense that deja-vu-all-over-again has set in.
  36. Passable summer thriller with some decent (for TV) action sequences. The plot? You've been there, done that.
  37. The acting is solid all around--just not entirely convincing.
  38. I do know something about TV shows, and this one works best when Anne Slowey is on camera (which is not nearly enough) and the program focuses on clothing - that great, exasperating, endlessly complicated art form known as "fashion."
  39. Michael is a clinically interesting personality type who is profoundly unempathetic, until such times as he is very empathetic. The wonderful creative trick of The Office is knowing exactly the right moment to humanize Michael.
  40. Sad thing is, I'm a geek girl myself, who'd be happy to love this mad mix of technology, action and "humor" if it were, you know, actually funny more often than just cheaply offensive. Less pander, more wit, please.
  41. Placid and often incomprehensibly bland, Combat Hospital still has flashes of intelligence. Definitely worth a second look.
  42. Ambitious and intermittently entertaining, Zero Hour--and its celebrated lead--don't quite hit all their marks. But at least the mystery's a hoot.
  43. Sit back, don't think, and expect some good performances--especially by Jennifer Carpenter.
  44. Intriguing cop show in Civil War New York--though neither the cop part nor Civil War part are entirely convincing.
  45. What's surprising is that there's nothing remotely cheesy about 4th and Loud, a good docuseries that trains the camera most of the time on the guys on the field.
  46. Middling start, but we've stuck with Rescue Me this long, and no point in bailing now.
  47. As a character with a sartorial preference for canary yellow, Kemper's Schmidt comes into focus intensely and immediately. She pops off the screen, and pleasingly so. Her series, less so.
  48. We know how this ends (he becomes commish) but there's little evidence suggesting how or why that happens, and even less reason why we should care. Meanwhile, the best stuff in Golden Boy is the little stuff--sharp, brittle dialogue, nice performances and a street cred that's a cut above average.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    As a quirky cross between Reynolds' Gator McKlusky and John Cazale's Fredo Corleone, Whitford pretty much hijacks the show. He's fun to watch, even if the show will knock your IQ down a few points.
  49. Despite the slightest everything's-up-to-date vibe, Cristela is really just another old-fashioned sitcom with roots that reach all the way back to the dawn of television, where shows neither offended nor scandalized.
  50. Carell's Scott may emerge as one of those characters viewers dearly love to hate, but the guess here is that he's too over the top - much more so than Gervais' character was - to be appreciated in doses this large. He'd be more effective as a secondary character - think Danny DeVito's immortally despicable Louie DePalma in "Taxi." [24 Mar 2005, p.B33]
    • Newsday
  51. The multi-ethnic cast is appealing and their cyber notions are nice, but it's hard to tell where this curious concoction is headed. They're certainly loading the dice with paranormal possibilities. [6 Oct 2000, p.B51]
    • Newsday
  52. Cane" is not a bad show, and it's sporadically a good one. Merely, great expectations have not been met.
  53. This fantasy adventure is actually tolerable now for adults who found ABC's May "Dinotopia" miniseries such an endless festival of special effects with little redeeming dramatic value. [28 Nov 2002]
    • Newsday
  54. Even the baby talk offers more variety than you'd think, with Danza frequently encountering friends with their own peculiar outlooks on toddler life (Roscoe Lee Browne voices a stuffy baby-actor in the second show). [8 Mar 1991, p.103]
    • Newsday
  55. Band of Brothers thus finds itself in a tricky no- man's land. It's too colloquial and too specific to be valuable in a larger historical sense, like the classic "World at War" series or any of the World War II documentaries that are a History Channel staple. Yet, it's too lacking in dramatic focal points to succeed fully as entertainment like "Private Ryan" or any of the dozens of World War II movies ("Battle Cry," "Battleground") that Hollywood turned out in the late 1940s and '50s. [7 Sept 2001, p.B02]
    • Newsday
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    What may bring even jaded viewers back to "Christy" is Tyne Daly's striking characterization of Alice Henderson, the kind but formidable Quaker who serves as the heroine's mentor. [3 Apr 1994]
    • Newsday
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The writing is occasionally sharp and observational, but the first episode relied too often on smarmy, anatomically based humor. [19 Apr 1990, p.9]
    • Newsday
  56. Tonight's preview/pilot can get so intoxicated with hip-hop scratching - jump-cuts, slo-mo, video backtracking - that it forgets to remember style best serves substance. [14 Apr 2003]
    • Newsday
  57. Some of Mamet's dialogue is certifiably awful and some certifiably brilliant, and the dichotomy is breathtaking.
  58. But no one from this new group makes the kind of nails-on-blackboard impression that Omarosa or know-it-all Sam immediately did last year. Initially, they don't seem as interesting as the originals. [9 Sep 2004]
    • Newsday
  59. Quinn radiates enough sincerity to make us keep reading this uneven book, just to see how it shapes up.
  60. It was... safe, reasonable, unembarrassing, uninspirational.
  61. While we've got to be grateful that last season's tone-deaf Applewhite saga has seen its end, this year's "DH" still is sounding the occasional flat note, sometimes by repeating its past and other times by ignoring it altogether. [22 Sep 2006]
    • Newsday
  62. ABC hasn't provided much in advance to watch--smart network!--but there were some clips for Wipeout, and they were (seriously) hilarious.
  63. A harmless and mostly fun little sitcom.
  64. I like the old "Star Trek" better than the new. I also think the new show is somewhat boring and derivative. ... The new "Star Trek" tries to make the characters "realistic," and they turn out to be unbreakably plastic. [3 Jun 1988]
    • Newsday
  65. You get the sense that the filmmakers' vision and Wright's are never quite in sync--or perhaps are in sync too perfectly.
  66. The wit can get a little heavyhanded sometimes - yes, it's another series with voiceover narration (can anybody say "Sex and the City"?) - but its heart, and head, are in the right place.
  67. Murphy's concept in its basics is already beautiful. But he pushes the show to be a breathtaking knockout. Like some plastic surgery patients, Nip/Tuck initially gets such a pleasing result that it doesn't seem to know when to stop.
  68. But my ultimate test for any comedy is - what else? - "Does it make me laugh?" Arrested Development seldom does. Not loudly, anyway...It has neither the liberating audacity of HBO's "Curb Your Enthusiasm" nor the delirious, anything-for-a-laugh energy of NBC's "Scrubs," the two contemporary comedies that consistently crack me up. It's reminiscent of the taboo- breaking 1970s comedy serial "Soap," but drier, more deadpan, and with less endearing characters. Does it deserve a wider audience than it has gotten? Sure. But I can't imagine it becoming a mainstream hit for Fox like "The Simpsons" or "Malcolm in the Middle."
    • Newsday
  69. [The episodes are] smarter than you might expect but not quite as clever as they work at being. Like the family unit it portrays, this dark/lighthearted drama tries to have everything at once and struggles under the far-reaching effort.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A pleasant but routine sitcom that uses that decade of significant social change as a hook...The Wonder Years handles its period details - clothing, hairstyles - well. The look of the '60s is rendered with an authentic, evocative feel. Like virtually every sitcom, it has its banal moments, and here and there the gags fizzle. [30 Jan 1988, p.11]
    • Newsday
  70. A relentlessly grim and deeply depressing viewing experience.
  71. A reasonably competent soap.
  72. If only the delicacy of these two character actors [Alfred Molina and Michael Keaton], were matched by that of The Company's central figures and the production's overall arc.
  73. Hall lacks Walken's natural aura of strangeness, and he looks a little too well-fed for a guy who has been vegetating for half a decade. But he does manage to make Smith credible and sympathetic. [14 June 2002, p.B51]
    • Newsday
  74. A watchable and skillfully made telefilm (Jay Roach of "Austin Powers" fame directed) that is, nonetheless, marred by a melodramatic reliance on Good vs. Evil, and guess which side is which?
  75. "Lost Room" is a shaggy dog story that gets shaggier with every scene. It's a tale as tall as the Empire State Building that threatens to topple in the merest breeze but - miraculously - never does.
  76. We haven't had a good dishy time-waster in awhile. Maybe this is it.
  77. "Flight of the Conchords" isn't brilliant, but it isn't awful, either, just familiar, with two likable stars who seem to be channeling the deadpan dry wit of an old Beatles movie.
  78. I liked it. But not enough to watch it again. [9 Jul 1992]
    • Newsday
  79. This Fox series is smartly written and acted, and it's even evocatively filmed in New York locations that lend it a gritty city flavor. But.... Less persuasively entwined is a heavy-handed romance whodunit.
  80. It's OK, but not great. [20 Sep 1993]
    • Newsday
  81. It's too sitcommy ... But I still love the concept of "NewsRadio." ... And most importantly for the future, "NewsRadio" has some strong people in the supporting cast. [20 Mar 1995]
    • Newsday
  82. "Brotherhood" is sharply written... Nevertheless, a heavy air of predictability hangs over "Brotherhood," which has a tendency to confirm viewer expectations instead of challenging them.
  83. This isn't "Friends," after all. At its hour length, "Related" asks us to take the Sorelli saga somewhat more seriously. Yet it provides sitcom incidents that can't stand the significance test.
  84. I'm ashamed to admit it in front of my more serious colleagues, but I think the show can be very funny. Of course, like everything else on TV, some of it hits, a lot of it misses. But in the midst of the pain, cruelty, ridicule and abuse, not to mention boredom, somebody falls into a manhole and I find myself bursting out laughing. [29 Mar 1990]
    • Newsday
  85. Watching Charlie stare into space and compute somehow isn't as persuasive as watching Gil Grissom or one of his "CSI" cohorts peer into a microscope. [23 Jan 2005]
    • Newsday
  86. In a word, The Listener is boring. Or, if you prefer alliteration, listless.
  87. Nothing remotely lurid in either show [7 Days of Sex and The Conversation With Amanda de Cadenet].
    • Newsday
  88. Nice locales (Paris! Rome!), a couple of decent action sequences... but otherwise a tepid potboiler over-seasoned with too many spy tropes and a plot with too many gaping holes.
  89. Nice to look at, good performances, but ultimately a snooze.
  90. Colorfully drawn. But all inside the lines.
  91. Sure, it all looks and sounds achingly familiar and blandly dumb, and maybe some of it is. But check the brain at the door. You could do much worse.
  92. Its rambling storytelling starts to reveal distinct shape in these people, their relationships and the show's quirky comic perspective [in the second episode].
  93. A messy newcomer with a "Twilight" saga vibe and "Twin Peaks" DNA.
  94. If only it were more interesting.

Top Trailers