Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,365 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Nashville (2012): Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Choice: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 896
  2. Negative: 0 out of 896
896 tv reviews
  1. As a team, they [Billy Crystal and Josh Gad] are better than the shows--both the real one and the fake one--they're in.
  2. This three-parter often lacks finesse and sophistication. The story is rushed or clumsily told, and the tone discordant....Watch for Atkins only. She's brilliant.
  3. "Potential," in fact, is the key word. It's definitely here, but "2" may also need all eight episodes to realize it.
  4. Powerful story. A shame Bessie rarely conveys the story's emotional wallop.
  5. CBS' sustained level of series craftsmanship is certainly admirable--their dramas all look sharp and function smoothly--but that doesn't go so far when even a sweeping period piece in a distinct locale with superior stars seems to roll off the same assembly line.
  6. Everything fans loved about the first season--which improved dramatically over its course, by the way--is here. Everyone is not. McIntyre is good, but he's not Whitfield, either.
  7. Where is this headed? Who knows? But it's heading there slowly. Nevertheless, the cast--Common, Meaney, Heyerdahl and Mount--is good, while the Old West still feels especially beautiful and perilous.
  8. Kaling's good (and always is), but the pilot is just not all that funny.
  9. A series that can still be occasionally talky and turgid.... Hardwick's the better and smoother actor, and certainly the more appealing one. But it's Jackson who gives this show bite and--to a considerable degree--life, too.
  10. Above-average newcomer with a great actor in the leading role and frosty grace notes throughout.
  11. There's a glimmer of hope here, and her name is Rebel Wilson. Now, the show needs to match her talents.
  12. In the end, don't much like Ray Donovan.... [But] Donovan ultimately succeeds on the little things--some very good performances by some very good actors and sharp dialogue by Biderman, who knows how to write Tough Guy talk with the best of them.
  13. If you love Zooey Deschanel, this one's for you. If not, a pass.
  14. Watch for any length of time and you may--as I did--have the eerie if not unpleasant feeling that you've been teleported to a decent network cop show from the 1970s.
  15. Like opening a time capsule. The boys remain the same. At least their snark has been updated for contemporary targets.
  16. Mostly this show belongs to Harmon, once a key member of the "Law & Order" ensemble. She's likable and intriguing. That salvages an otherwise average cop show.
  17. Not terrible--really--but not yet remotely the winner NBC so badly needs either.
  18. Rubicon unfolds at a languid pace, dispensing information at the rate a not-quite-broken kitchen faucet dispenses drops. You want it to speed up. You want some urgency. You want a few more thrills in this thriller. At least this average TV viewer does.
  19. Hot in Cleveland is a by-the-numbers sitcom with a couple of laughs, an inoffensive premise and four seasoned actresses who make the material much better than it is.
  20. Unfortunately, one show's a classic, the other a near knockoff. Nevertheless, Poehler's still got plenty of appeal here.
  21. Malibu Country is nothing great. But its studio-shot sitcom style sure suits Reba.
  22. The cast feels solid, and likable, jelling swiftly.... Then comes that final distasteful sex gag. Let's pray it's just pilot-itis.
  23. [Bakula and Pounder] should make the process of watching--or chore of watching, depending on your appetite for more of this formula--just a little more agreeable.
  24. You're the Worst exudes some charm (Cash is rich indeed) but can't keep from overstepping, either. It's saved by relationship detail and human vulnerability that "Married" utterly misses.
  25. Lucky 7 might offer more to like than authentic texture of place, race, personality and workplace emotions.
  26. Tonight's premiere may seem like ridiculous twaddle, and it may feel like a major downer (and kinda sloooow), too, but maybe that's just Bruckheimer playing with our heads. In fact, Hour deserves a second look (next week is definitely better).
  27. Forgive the pun, but this brass needs polishing. The Green/Burgess team is one of TV's best and we hope they'll make this show as sharp and compelling as it should be.
  28. Been here/seen this--a lot--but familiarity could work in favor of Deception.
  29. Skies needs more horror. Less talk. More dramatic tension. Less (ummm) talk. More crazy, wild shootouts with the despicable aliens, who don't seem particularly bright, by the way. Less (all together now) talk.
  30. If it wasn't a docucomedy, it would just be dull.
  31. Mann and HBO deserve much credit for profiling these extraordinary people. It's just too bad the execution tends to be a little long-winded or not nearly as expansive as it should be.
  32. Let's say Lone Star has its work cut out for it, and so does Wolk. His portrayal is too nice--too romantic, too good-hearted, too bland--to make Allen interesting, or at least convincing.
  33. The McCarthys--good-natured, old-fashioned, unchallenging--isn't a bad sitcom, just an obvious one.
  34. This is four hours of love and music, but the film also wants to address the many controversies, then excuse them. The result: Some lily-gilding, and far too many observations we've heard far too many times before and factoids, too.
  35. The Tenth Inning is dutiful, sober and thoughtful. No spitballs are thrown. No banned substances have been added to bloat it up to obscene, grotesque proportions. What is missing in at least tonight's installment is surprise, or the pleasant shock of learning something brand new or unexpected.
  36. It feels observed, rather than lived in. Enacted, rather than unfolding.
  37. Familiar doesn't mean bad, and there's some likable charm here.
  38. So far, so good. No late night talk show has ever been canceled after one edition--not even Chevy's--while first albeit abbreviated impressions of Conan are promising.
  39. You can't help realizing that just by the act of taping a reality show, the Bruces--all nine of them--are already employed in a job, albeit a temporary one.
  40. Gleeks will engage; hard to imagine who else will.
  41. It's a cut above boilerplate, with good production values and decent performances.
  42. Way too obscure for the average viewer, Comic Book Men is strictly for Smith groupies, and there are probably enough of those to keep this six-parter afloat over its short run.
  43. Enjoy the atmospherics. They're good. Just don't expect them to lead to a satisfying payoff. It might never come.
  44. The Narrative knot is further jumbled by all the head games Two plays on him and everyone else. Six is on shifting sand, and so, too, will you be.
  45. This can sometimes be an exercise in rehashing as opposed to reassessment.... The Seventies, however, gets better when the story gets stronger, or at least more resonant.
  46. A by-the-book cop show without much bite or heft. But it's got Memphis and Lee.
  47. There's too much going on to tell what might ultimately stick, other than the contents of the Mallow Marsh.
  48. The show is scattered, slight and abominably self-promotional. But Michaels is so full of abundant - and infectious - good cheer that you tend to overlook these many faults. Fans will eat it up.
  49. It's an exhaustive and exhausting film, but Garbus finds nothing that will change minds or reverse conclusions. The tragic void remains.
  50. Bonnie & Clyde really is just another biopic with superior production values, a few good performances and a pair of protagonists who deserve no sympathy, and receive none here.
  51. Not great, not terrible--just your standard-issue TV movie about a well-known historic event.
  52. Interesting detours, and a worthy show--but at times just a smidgen too self-righteous and melodramatic.
  53. There's so much to like here. Now, all P&R has to do is become consistently likable.
  54. Pauly is still Pauly--but he's a more grown-up version who cares about his friends, ailing dad and career.
  55. At least Emily proves she's got the chops to cast a shadow of her own.
  56. Stellar production, famous leads. What's missing? Heart.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The cameos often are amusing, and so is Kudrow, but someone at Showtime evidently forgot to ask whether a one-joke webisode can or should be expanded into a one-joke TV series. This one feels like a strrrretch.
  57. I laughed. Not often, or perhaps not often enough, but there was also enough McFarlane-esque gross-out sophomoric tomfoolery to keep even me reasonably entertained for a half-hour. Plus, good ol' likable Cleveland works well as a leading man.
  58. It's summer, expectations are low, and you could do a lot worse than this genial, softhearted import.
  59. The angel on my shoulder says H8R is a piece of slime, bringing out the worst in everyone involved. But the devil on my other shoulder says this show is the logical outcome of our culture's celeb-obsession, and everyone involved gets precisely what they deserve. Which is soooo fun to watch.
  60. The pilot is so busy establishing its new world, performances are afterthought generic. But Defiance gets more distinctive, and dramatic, through its next two hour episodes.
  61. Mostly boilerplate teen soap that lacks the (umm) zest of "Sex and the City"--a good thing, in case you're wondering.
  62. This is a thoughtful, dutiful historic drama filled with all the requisite period details and British accents, too. But what's missing here, glaringly so, are passion and sweep .
  63. The performance tends to be monochromatic, and in the end, so is Mildred Pierce. What's especially enjoyable here are the minor performances--especially Pearce as the louche Monty--and the many almost imperceptibly small details, right down to the crockery in a restaurant.
  64. Garcia is a major-league cutie and sunny on-screen presence without being cloying. But enough with the filthy-rich-kid dramedies!
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Sure, it's a glossy, well-produced infomercial filled with powerful live performances, but it feels designed to make us want to buy more Beyoncé stuff.
  65. Competent spinoff, but the formula tends to wear like a straitjacket on Whitaker.
  66. The time allotted isn't long enough to truly convey the touchstones a sci-fi devotee might demand. But with so much skated through, it's plenty to confuse a newbie.
  67. Falco is very good, always is, but her show has gotten tired.
  68. Thurgood feels more "important" than dramatic. Part of it is Stevens' then-I-did-this structure, more focused on biographical bullet points than the flesh-and-blood human behind them. And part of it is Fishburne, who despite coiled power--his Ike Turner in "What's Love Got to Do With It" was Oscar-nominated--resonates here as a cool character rather than a fiery one.
  69. A not-bad formula gothic that'll rise or fall on the Dekker/Robertson chemistry; I'm betting on the former.
  70. The feel is more documentary than "reality" show, which some viewers will appreciate and others won't.
  71. At first, the pace is slow--make that glacial--but [the] pilot episode (and especially Sunjata) are good-natured enough to make you want to stick around to see if this gels into anything approaching an FX drama (it does not).
  72. A not-unpleasing comedy that takes time and commitment to grow on you. How long? I started to like it three or four episodes in. Seems like an awfully long time, no?
  73. Respectable, incomplete survey (on TV) Thursday night, but future installments look better.
  74. Amusing, dumb, silly--exactly what you'd expect.
  75. Will a cheerfully biased newcomer with a few amusing, well-crafted one-liners be enough to get FX on the boards in late night? To paraphrase Yoda, difficult to say--always in motion is the future--but Rock may want to light a fire under this act sooner than later.
  76. Hilarious implausibility, overheated dialogue and enough soap to do several loads of laundry are part of its appeal.
  77. While True Blood remains wildly and bloodily inventive--and will certainly remain a huge HBO hit--there's still an overwhelming sense that deja-vu-all-over-again has set in.
  78. Passable summer thriller with some decent (for TV) action sequences. The plot? You've been there, done that.
  79. The acting is solid all around--just not entirely convincing.
  80. I do know something about TV shows, and this one works best when Anne Slowey is on camera (which is not nearly enough) and the program focuses on clothing - that great, exasperating, endlessly complicated art form known as "fashion."
  81. Michael is a clinically interesting personality type who is profoundly unempathetic, until such times as he is very empathetic. The wonderful creative trick of The Office is knowing exactly the right moment to humanize Michael.
  82. Sad thing is, I'm a geek girl myself, who'd be happy to love this mad mix of technology, action and "humor" if it were, you know, actually funny more often than just cheaply offensive. Less pander, more wit, please.
  83. Placid and often incomprehensibly bland, Combat Hospital still has flashes of intelligence. Definitely worth a second look.
  84. Ambitious and intermittently entertaining, Zero Hour--and its celebrated lead--don't quite hit all their marks. But at least the mystery's a hoot.
  85. Sit back, don't think, and expect some good performances--especially by Jennifer Carpenter.
  86. Intriguing cop show in Civil War New York--though neither the cop part nor Civil War part are entirely convincing.
  87. What's surprising is that there's nothing remotely cheesy about 4th and Loud, a good docuseries that trains the camera most of the time on the guys on the field.
  88. Middling start, but we've stuck with Rescue Me this long, and no point in bailing now.
  89. As a character with a sartorial preference for canary yellow, Kemper's Schmidt comes into focus intensely and immediately. She pops off the screen, and pleasingly so. Her series, less so.
  90. We know how this ends (he becomes commish) but there's little evidence suggesting how or why that happens, and even less reason why we should care. Meanwhile, the best stuff in Golden Boy is the little stuff--sharp, brittle dialogue, nice performances and a street cred that's a cut above average.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    As a quirky cross between Reynolds' Gator McKlusky and John Cazale's Fredo Corleone, Whitford pretty much hijacks the show. He's fun to watch, even if the show will knock your IQ down a few points.
  91. Despite the slightest everything's-up-to-date vibe, Cristela is really just another old-fashioned sitcom with roots that reach all the way back to the dawn of television, where shows neither offended nor scandalized.
  92. Carell's Scott may emerge as one of those characters viewers dearly love to hate, but the guess here is that he's too over the top - much more so than Gervais' character was - to be appreciated in doses this large. He'd be more effective as a secondary character - think Danny DeVito's immortally despicable Louie DePalma in "Taxi." [24 Mar 2005, p.B33]
    • Newsday
  93. The multi-ethnic cast is appealing and their cyber notions are nice, but it's hard to tell where this curious concoction is headed. They're certainly loading the dice with paranormal possibilities. [6 Oct 2000, p.B51]
    • Newsday
  94. Cane" is not a bad show, and it's sporadically a good one. Merely, great expectations have not been met.
  95. This fantasy adventure is actually tolerable now for adults who found ABC's May "Dinotopia" miniseries such an endless festival of special effects with little redeeming dramatic value. [28 Nov 2002]
    • Newsday
  96. Even the baby talk offers more variety than you'd think, with Danza frequently encountering friends with their own peculiar outlooks on toddler life (Roscoe Lee Browne voices a stuffy baby-actor in the second show). [8 Mar 1991, p.103]
    • Newsday
  97. Band of Brothers thus finds itself in a tricky no- man's land. It's too colloquial and too specific to be valuable in a larger historical sense, like the classic "World at War" series or any of the World War II documentaries that are a History Channel staple. Yet, it's too lacking in dramatic focal points to succeed fully as entertainment like "Private Ryan" or any of the dozens of World War II movies ("Battle Cry," "Battleground") that Hollywood turned out in the late 1940s and '50s. [7 Sept 2001, p.B02]
    • Newsday

Top Trailers