Newsday's Scores

  • TV
For 1,509 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Walking Dead: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Woops!: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 988
  2. Negative: 0 out of 988
988 tv reviews
  1. Gardell and McCarthy are two of the more realistic-feeling, instantly appealing sitcom personalities in ages. They're enough to make it worth drudging through the sludge tonight's pilot considers comedy writing.
  2. Being Human echoes, move for move, the BBC America fave of the same name. Yet, Syfy simplifies the tone into young-adult novelhood, where there's lots of white space around really big print. Subsequent episodes improve as plots thicken.
    • Newsday
  3. Well-written, directed and acted, Billions is still badly in need of a more human touch.
  4. Overall, this was a good start.... The show was rushed, the commercialism troubling, the interviews a mixed bag. But no one looks for perfection the first night--just signs, and they were mostly positive Tuesday.
  5. Some twisty situations, some unexpected heart, some nuanced acting. Some serious single-camera potential.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Overall, a meaner, harsher fashion competition, but compelling.
  6. A not-bad techno-thriller that could go interesting places.
  7. An amusing and not-bad game show; Bailey makes it bearable.
  8. For such a vast and important story, Torchwood: Miracle Day feels strangely confined and artificial. Here's hoping for more by Episode 4.
  9. Get past the tough-to-buy setup of the premiere, and Shades improves. The star? Initially tough to buy, too, but also improves.
  10. Crazy Obsession gives us benign compulsives who mainly come off as amusing.
  11. The pair has recast the concept and their chemistry into a suburban setting that feels fresher and friendlier, truly finding its footing at 10:30 with Sloane (and those gnomes).
  12. Noble intentions meet nice people.
  13. Vikings quickly settles into a fairly routine sword-and-sandal epic narrative that revolves around a sociopath overlord and the subjects who dare to challenge his authority. But it gets better.
  14. Impastor weakens its good work by trying a bit too hard.
  15. The best parts of Show Me a Hero are the sharply drawn mini-portraits of people who will ultimately move into the new public housing. Spread throughout the first five hours, you hope you will find a hero there, but in vain. They're just normal people looking for a better life, and ultimately find one.
  16. The early part of the third may not be as good as the first season or stretches of the second, but for a few million anxiously awaiting Sunday, it's still good enough.
  17. Heights almost feels like atonement for the biggest hit in MTV history. The kids don't swear (much), esteem their elders, work at their dreams and have no obvious or debilitating vices--until they drink.
  18. Unassuming Longmire doesn't shout "LOVE ME!" but instead works its charms subtly, quietly.
  19. I wanted to love Fringe, with its extraordinary pedigree and exotic, soulful Australian beauty Torv in the lead role, and splendid Noble in key support. Plus, Blair Brown's here, too, as a top exec at an evil corporation. But I just can't shake this word "derivative."
  20. This is pure kiddie fare; no big deal--Chuck's back; TV's a better place.
  21. A baffling, beautiful, maddening, provocative puzzle.
  22. This intelligent, sensitive portrait effectively explores a lost childhood and remarkable mind. It's engrossing to a point, then tiresome.
  23. Being Mary Jane has been formulated for being fascinating. Now comes the follow-through.
  24. The Save Me pilot saves itself artistically. But debuting in a summertime double dose makes series salvation improbable.
  25. Gritty, jarring, profane and smartly produced.
  26. A partially successful reboot, with less music, more story.
  27. Suffice it to say, keep the kids away, but you will laugh - and feel guilty about it afterward.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Though they certainly cover the heady early days, filled with screaming girls and their cultivated persona as the anti-Beatles, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards aren't afraid to keep it real. Both show some interesting insights into their success.
    • Newsday
  28. A good portrait of a fallen man and the place he has fallen into. Promising--but also frustrating.

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