Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 918 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Memento
Lowest review score: 0 Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 68 out of 918
918 movie reviews
  1. Suspended between the brutally graphic and flights of lyrical fancy, Pan's Labyrinth unfolds with the confidence of a classical fable, one that paradoxically feels both timeless and startlingly new.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A stunning glimpse at acting -- and life -- in the raw.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The film is short on biographical details and the history of the music, and long on impressions of the musicians' character and motivations.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether Series 7, filmed on digital video for less than $1 million, is reactive or prescient doesn’t change the fact that it’s a dead-on parody of the form.
    • Newsweek
  2. This spirited rerun, neatly mixing parody and panache, squeezes a surprising amount of fun out of the old war horse.
  3. Though acid is dropped, groupies are bartered like poker chips and rock-star egos flare like fireworks, what comes through is the relative innocence of that era.
    • Newsweek
  4. Slacker is a very funny, oddly touching, weirdly appealing look at the young (and not so young) people who live (sort of) in the nooks and crannies of this college town. [22 July 1991, p.57]
    • Newsweek
  5. Despite an overwrought finale, this stylish horror film is genuinely creepy. See it before the inevitable Hollywood remake.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The only thing you can count on in this exhilarating movie is that nothing is what it seems. Even the borough of Queens looks beautiful.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An engrossing, superbly acted film that will haunt the viewer's thoughts long after the film is over.
    • Newsweek
  6. As we watch the astonishing NASA footage, they eloquently evoke the optimism, anxiety and excitement of those voyages.
  7. Superman II is a success, a stirring sequel to the smash of '79. Whether you will prefer it to the original is like choosing between root beer and Fresca. They're both bubbly, but the flavor is different. What the follow-up doesn't have is the epic lyricism of Richard Donner's version; it's harder edged, fleeter on its feet, less reverential. [22 June 1981, p.87]
    • Newsweek
  8. More sweet than savage, this amiable farce creates laughs with old-pro efficiency.
    • Newsweek
  9. A hilarious, rousing musical comedy set at a summer camp where NOBODY plays sports and EVERYBODY worships Stephen Sondheim.
  10. If you like your summer popcorn movies laced with a little poisoned butter, Gremlins is not to be missed. [18 June 1984, p.90]
    • Newsweek
  11. A wonderfully quirky cast under Francis Ford Coppola's direction makes this one of the more enjoyable John Grisham movies.
  12. Shankman and his screenwriter, Leslie Dixon, prove you can make a lightweight Broadway musical into big movie fun.
  13. This German movie, with its lush cinematography and lovely score, has the sturdiness of an old-fashioned Hollywood epic. What isn’t Hollywood is Link’s refusal to tell the audience how to feel at every moment.
  14. Where so many comic-book movies feel as disposable as Kleenex, the passionate, uncynical Hulk stamps itself into your memory. Lee’s movies are built to last.
  15. Nair’s stereotype-shattering movie -- like the polymorphous culture it illuminates -- borrows from Bollywood, Hollywood and cinema verite, and comes up with something exuberantly its own.
    • Newsweek
  16. Cusack is a master at playing smart, frazzled, self-flagellating hipsters, and the movie, propelled by his arias of angst, lets him strut his best stuff.
    • Newsweek
  17. If some nagging sense of anachronism, a bit too much Freudian Vienna in his postmodern New York, prevents Eyes Wide Shut from being at the top of his list, Kubrick's 13th and last film is his most humane.
  18. Hilarious, satirical and melancholy, Rudo y Cursi may not go as deep as "Y Tu Mamá También," but it has a similar vivacity. It turns this tale of brotherly bonds and sibling rivalry--a veiled allegory of the Cuarón boys themselves?--into one of the year's most memorable offerings.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Glenn Close, Bette Midler and Roger Bart (who plays one half of a gay couple slated for Stepfordizing) are hilarious, and even Nicole Kidman flashes comedic gifts not seen since "To Die For."
  19. Superman turns out to be a surprisingly infectious entertainment, nicely balanced between warmth and wit, intimacy and impressive special effects, comic-strip fantasy and several elements that make the movie eminently eligible for Deep Thinking about rescue fantasies, cherubic messiahs and other pieces of popcorn metaphysics. [1 Jan 1979, p.46]
    • Newsweek
  20. In this gorgeously melancholic fresco of love affairs, Tony Leung Chiu Wai plays a womanizing pulp-fiction writer in '60s Hong Kong.
  21. Will be remembered as a vintage Rohmer harvest.
  22. As eye-popping as anything Pixar has done. But Cars inspires more admiration than elation. It dazzles even as it disappoints. This time around, John Lasseter and his codirector, the late Joe Ranft, seem more interested in dispensing Life Lessons than showing us a roaring good time.
  23. It’s like a nightmare that follows you around in daylight: you can’t quite decode it, you can’t shake it, you can’t stop turning it over and over in your mind. This is one queasily powerful movie.
  24. Chocolat is a seriocomic plea for tolerance, gift-wrapped in the baby blue colors of a fairy tale and served up with a sybaritic smile.
    • Newsweek

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