Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 911 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Lowest review score: 0 Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 911
911 movie reviews
  1. Think of it as an epic poem, in which Scorsese's swirling, headlong baroque camera searches paradoxically for the stillness at the meditative heart of Buddhism. [22 December 1997, p. 86]
    • Newsweek
  2. A superbly taut and well-made thriller that jumps from Geneva to Rome, from Paris to Beirut, from Athens to Brooklyn, each lethal assignment staged with a mastery Hitchcock might envy.
  3. The true allure of Titanic is its invitation to swoon at a scale of epic moviemaking that is all but obsolete.
  4. Gorgeous, mesmerizing, and stunningly well acted.
    • Newsweek
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Affleck directed, stars in, and co-wrote The Town, a suspenseful, fiercely paced movie about bank robbers that is also about love, brotherhood, and the desperate need to escape a crooked life. It proves that "Gone Baby Gone," his accomplished directing debut, was no fluke.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Condon's obvious attempts to draw parallels between Whale's life and his work tend to be heavy-handed, and detract from an otherwise intriguing film.
  5. An excruciatingly entertaining portrait of the filmmaking process that no Hollywood studio would ever allow to be shown. But Gilliam, bless his impish, obsessive heart, is anything but a Hollywood type.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The dedication of the Canadian team strains belief at times, and for good reason.
    • Newsweek
  6. This delightful film, with its surprising depth charges of emotion, has the feel of a movie that's going to lodge itself in the public's affections for a long time to come.
    • Newsweek
  7. Like many of Winterbottom's movies, it falls a step short of its full potential. Its tact is both its strength and its weakness. The climax feels rushed: it's the rare movie these days that feels too short.
  8. The wonder of Invictus is that it actually went down this way.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's gory stuff, but it's also a visually arresting blitzkrieg with action so bare-knuckled you'll leave the theater spitting out teeth.
  9. A wonderfully taut cat-and-mouse thriller.
  10. It’s sad to see such stunning work self-destruct. You walk out haunted by the movie that might have been.
    • Newsweek
  11. Every bit as tasteless, irreverent, silly and smart as the Comedy Central cartoon that catapulted creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone into the Hollywood catbird seat.
  12. It's a deliciously outrageous premise, and director Barry Levinson and writers David Mamet and Hilary Henkin know just how to spin it, savaging Washington and Hollywood with merciless wit. It's a hoot.
  13. Explores both prepubescent and teen sexuality with an honesty that may make some people uncomfortable, which is a sign of its potency, and a badge of honor.
  14. Penn's eye for landscapes is stunning, and his affection for outsider lifestyles is tangible. Hirsch, who carries the film on his increasingly emaciated shoulders, performs heroically, but there's an edge missing. The ideal casting would have been the young Sean Penn.
  15. With honesty, charm and an uncanny sympathy for all its characters, the film takes us deep inside the awkward and exhilarating experience of first love.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Brilliantly strange, often funny and ultimately heartbreaking film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Manages to maintain its humor and energy until the final scene.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the film is clumsy and overheated at times, it is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful films of the year. Set in turn-of-the-century London and Venice, its rich colors and opulent textures will linger long after the plot has been forgotten.
  16. Director Jay Roach ("Austin Powers") has a keen sense of comic timing, and the script keeps finding clever new ways to mortify our poor hero.
  17. As anthropology, it's fascinating, and everything about the production is first class. But the human drama at the heart of this movie is stillborn.
  18. To blends sentimentality, shoot-outs and cool humor into a bewitchingly entertaining brew.
  19. As he did in “The English Patient,” Minghella artfully weds movie-movie romanticism with a dark historical vision. The man knows how to cast a spell.
  20. (Douglas) is a superb (and underused) comic actor, one who knows that the secret of being funny is never begging for a laugh.
  21. The movie itself, like these guys, is defiantly old school -- confident, relaxed, professional.
  22. It’s too bad that at the very end L.I.E. settles for an easy, melodramatic resolution; it flies in the face of everything that makes this perceptive, original movie so special.
    • Newsweek
  23. Smart, informative and lively polemic.

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