Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
For 895 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Persepolis
Lowest review score: 0 Meet Joe Black
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 895
895 movie reviews
  1. The dialogue is tacky, the characters stock and the special effects no improvement on anything George Lucas did 20 years ago.
  2. These actresses are always worth seeing in just about anything, as is Tuscany. Together they are able to make up for the meandering plot and lack of dramatic oomph.
  3. The fans who have kept John Berendt's nonfiction tale on the best-seller list for more than three years may come away feeling they've seen "Perry Mason" on Valium. [1 December 1997, p.87]
    • Newsweek
  4. Mangold is something of a pseudo-Scorsese, assembling elements of other pictures like "Internal Affairs" and "Bad Lieutenant" into an eclectic mix that lacks its own vital reality.
  5. The saving grace of Con Air is its sense of its own absurdity.
  6. Never mean-spirited, A Dirty Shame has some big laughs, but it's a one-joke movie that shows its strain well before the finish line.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Roberts and Gibson form a "pas de deux," two lonely urbanites fighting vague yet common enemies in a plot that never quite comes together.
  7. Ultimately, Huckabees doesn't work. But it sure does stimulate. This is just the kind of "failure" we could use plenty more of.
  8. Director Mimi Leder fills the mindless-action-movie quota quite stylishly. The trouble is, The Peacemaker thinks it has a mind.
  9. In Lost Highway, reality has become a dream. But Lynch has forgotten how boring it is listening to someone else's dream.
  10. Sometimes stunning, ultimately stupefying epic .
  11. The storytelling is cheesy, but action fans won't want to miss the debut of the Next Big Thing in martial arts.
  12. It's sometimes hard to tell the characters from the candelabra. This lavish screen version of Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical is so chockablock with decorative detail the human figures are often competing with the decor for attention.
  13. This clumsy attempt to merge Jane Austen's classic with Bollywood musical conventions falls painfully flat.
  14. You're not sure where it's headed, but with an ensemble this good the aimlessness seems invigorating. It's when the plot kicks in that Newell's movie gets less interesting. It's frustrating to see such a promising premise, and such a delightful cast, wasted.
  15. Harron sets the stage expertly, but her lack of a point of view ultimately enervates the movie. [6 May 1996, p. 78]
    • Newsweek
  16. Howard redeems this lumpy fantasy. Soft-spoken and mysterious, he presides over the movie with a dangerous, feline grace.
  17. The presence of Connery is pure balm, purring those Celtic tones like smoky single-malt Scotch.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There is too much disconcerting and nasty violence in this light-hearted caper, but when it sticks to its romantic guns, it is often charming.
  18. It has a lovely score by Thomas Newman, stunning production design, striking costumes and gorgeous cinematography. Unfortunately, it just doesn't jell.
  19. Slick and violent and reasonably tense, Ransom holds your attention without being the least bit interesting. [11Nov1996 Pg. 74]
    • Newsweek
  20. Technology has squeezed character to a few measly pixels on the digital screens. Explosions have replaced dramatic climaxes.
  21. But the tale has been squeezed to fit the mold of director John Hughes, which for long stretches makes it feel as much like the third "Home Alone" as the second "Dalmations."
  22. It's gorgeous. It's epic. It's spectacular. But two hours later, it also proves to be emotionally impenetrable.
  23. Soft to the point of squishiness, Phenomenon is rescued from terminal bathos by Travolta's radiant conviction.
  24. Congo is basically the old African ooga-mooga movie brought into the P.C., high-tech age.
  25. The movie does have somewhat more lilt and levity, much of it due to Jim Carrey as the Riddler. But there's still plenty of murk, physical and metaphysical, and more psychobabble about Bruce Wayne's obsessions and repressions.
  26. Lurching uncertainly from slapstick to tears, The Family Stone works hard to warm the cockles of our hearts. The cast is attractive. The sentiments are commendable. But the love Bezucha wants us to feel for the family couldn't possibly compete with the love they already feel for themselves.
  27. The theatricality is off the charts. Lane aims for the balconies; Broderick tones it down for the camera a bit.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At least in the new Omen, the filmmakers have the sense to keep evil Damien's dialogue to a minimum. His villainy is all in the dimples. But is it too familiar to be scary anymore?

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