Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 903 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 When We Were Kings
Lowest review score: 0 Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 903
903 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    In the end, the film lacks the skill of its actors and ends up feeling disjointed and confused about its own message.
  1. There's something decidedly mechanical about this intermittently gripping movie's bleak view of human nature.
  2. The film seems to want us to pin a medal to its own chest.
  3. Damon's Ripley is considerably different from the charming sociopath in Patricia Highsmith's novel or the smooth lothario played by Alain Delon in the 1960 French thriller "Purple Noon."
  4. Harron sets the stage expertly, but her lack of a point of view ultimately enervates the movie. [6 May 1996, p. 78]
    • Newsweek
  5. In the antic, melancholy comedy The Royal Tenenbaums, the singular Wes Anderson (“Rushmore”) abandons his native Texas for a storybook vision of New York.
    • Newsweek
  6. It’s sad to see such stunning work self-destruct. You walk out haunted by the movie that might have been.
    • Newsweek
  7. Penn's eye for landscapes is stunning, and his affection for outsider lifestyles is tangible. Hirsch, who carries the film on his increasingly emaciated shoulders, performs heroically, but there's an edge missing. The ideal casting would have been the young Sean Penn.
  8. As anthropology, it's fascinating, and everything about the production is first class. But the human drama at the heart of this movie is stillborn.
  9. Ray
    It's hobbled by the too-familiar conventions of the musical biopic: with so many chapters of Charles's life to cover, Hackford's movie never finds a rhythm, a groove, to settle into. It wins its battles without winning the war.
    • Newsweek
  10. Go
    John August's trickily structured script owes an all too obvious debt to "Pulp Fiction," but Liman's film is more like kiddie Tarantino.
  11. Self-conscious to the point of suffocation.
    • Newsweek
  12. Gangs is a dream project Scorsese has wanted to make for 30 years. You have to honor its mad ambition. But sadly, it feels like a dream too long deferred.
  13. Too facile to resonate deeply. Shouldn't a movie celebrating Nash give you some idea what his mathematical work is about? Fishier still is the suggestion that the cure for paranoid schizophrenia is love.
    • Newsweek
  14. This Man in Black is, frankly, a bit of a wuss. As a love story, Walk the Line can seduce. As a biopic, it treads awfully familiar Overcoming Adversity turf.
  15. The storytelling seems occasionally disjointed, but more important, for all the special-effects wizardry, that touch of film magic never surfaces.
  16. It succeeds in bringing O'Barr's comic-book vision to life, but there's little else going on behind the graphic razzle-dazzle and the moody, ominous soundtrack.
  17. The Wrath of Khan is a small soap opera about a man coming to terms with age and death and a son he had never acknowledged. It's really "On Golden Galaxy," and it would have made a lot more sense as a modestly produced hour of television. [7 June 1982, p.53]
    • Newsweek
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While the first half showcases an impressive new directorial talent, the last two quarters fail to score.
  18. What keeps this movie honest is the characters, each of them a mass of conflicting instincts, virtues and vices. You know Gonzalez Inarritu comes from outside Hollywood because he doesn't divide the world into heroes and villains.
  19. I might buy Babel if it had any real interest in its characters, but it's too busy moving them around its mechanistic chessboard to explore any nuances or depths.
  20. An ambitious, intense, but overdetermined exploration of the varieties of ethnic intolerance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If the film has a problem, it's that the Farrelly brothers, co-writers and directors, seem content to bunt for long stretches between home runs.
  21. Frothing from two mouths, they parody film noir, megaviolent thrillers, sports allegories, ravaged-war-veteran movies, existentialist Westerns, even Busby Berkeley musicals.
  22. There are inspired moments in this edgy, unstable comedy.
  23. The storytelling is cheesy, but action fans won't want to miss the debut of the Next Big Thing in martial arts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Once Fletcher starts telling the truth against his will, the movie delivers some perfect laughs.
  24. Doubt stirs up a lot of stormy theatrical weather, but the stolid transfer from stage to screen does Shanley's play no favors.
  25. Howard redeems this lumpy fantasy. Soft-spoken and mysterious, he presides over the movie with a dangerous, feline grace.
  26. This scary, eye-opening documentary looks back from a post-9/11 vantage point to see how Ike’s prophecy has come horribly true.

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