Newsweek's Scores

  • Movies
For 895 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 67 out of 895
895 movie reviews
  1. A meticulous, spellbinding, provocative depiction of the final days of the Third Reich.
  2. Let the Right One In unfolds with quiet, masterly assurance.
  3. Blackly funny, unafraid to shift emotional gears from farce to horror, peppered with spectacular action.
  4. By the end of this white-knuckle movie, you stand in awe at the depth of man's will to survive. Touching the Void leaves you emotionally and physically spent, and grateful it was only a movie, not a mountain, you had to endure.
  5. Most of the time, Demme's deliberately unstable mixture of moods and genres produces electric results. Rachel Getting Married takes a familiar subject--the raw nerves of American family life with--and draws fresh blood.
  6. Press and Blunt are major discoveries: in this sly and wonderfully atmospheric gem, they conjure up the role-playing raptures of youth with perfect poetic pitch.
  7. Barry Sonnenfeld's bouncy, immensely likable adaptation.
  8. You may emerge more exhausted than elated. Nolan wants to prove that a superhero movie needn't be disposable, effects-ridden junk food, and you have to admire his ambition. But this is Batman, not "Hamlet." Call me shallow, but I wish it were a little more fun.
  9. Exuberantly theatrical yet every inch a movie, and some numbers ("The Cell Block Tango") are so entertaining you might want to applaud.
  10. There's something decidedly mechanical about this intermittently gripping movie's bleak view of human nature.
  11. Written with an acute ear by Barbara Turner (Leigh's mother) and directed by Ulu Grosbard, it's a resonant, grittily specific film.
  12. Will be remembered as a vintage Rohmer harvest.
  13. Summer hasn't arrived, but the funniest riff on a summer movie genre has already landed.
  14. Unnerving because it forces us into uncharted waters: Solondz doesn't tell us how to feel but makes us thrash out our responses for ourselves. In doing so, he has made one of the few indelible movies of the year.
  15. Intimate, moving and playful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A brutal black comedy. It asks real questions and takes real chances.
  16. The uncontestable triumph of Goblet of Fire, however, is Brendan Gleeson's Alastor (Mad-Eye) Moody, the grizzled new Defense Against the Dark Arts professor.
  17. Shankman and his screenwriter, Leslie Dixon, prove you can make a lightweight Broadway musical into big movie fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A fairy tale reminding us that childhood fears are deep and tangled as tree roots.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The old pros cavort grandly. Moore even strips down to a black bra and panties, and rolls in bed with her husband (George Segal).
    • Newsweek
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A surprisingly tender, even heartbreaking, film. Like the original, it's a tragic tale of beauty and the beast.
  18. It happens to be one of the most wildly (and disturbingly) inventive animated films I've seen.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The film is short on biographical details and the history of the music, and long on impressions of the musicians' character and motivations.
  19. No simple diatribe against capital punishment, it's a strong film, made stronger by two terrific performances.
  20. The first-time writer-director, Englishman Richard Kwietniowski, has adapted Gilbert Adair's novel with wit, economy and a delicate understanding that the funniest comedies are played with dead seriousness.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A beautifully told story of a child's innocence and faith, filmed with exquisite detail and stunning cinematography
    • Newsweek
  21. With Saraband, the great writer-director has stepped back into the ring for one last epic wrestle with his demons. There is, as always, no easy outcome. But no one ever fought for higher emotional and spiritual stakes.
  22. Every character--not just the kids, but the teachers as well--comes alive with a complexity worthy of Jean Renoir. The lyricism of Wild Reeds doesn't cast a smoke screen of nostalgia, it brings us closer to the experience of adolescence.
  23. Perfectly reflects the range of this funny, disturbing and complex tale.
  24. Noyce uses his Hollywood craft to unfold this primal, powerful story, he has an epic feel for the harshly beautiful Australian landscape and he gets wonderfully natural performances from the three girls. His bold, lyrical images stay in your head, like an unaccountably beautiful nightmare.
    • Newsweek

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