No Ripcord's Scores

  • Music
For 1,663 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 The Monitor
Lowest review score: 0 All Things Bright and Beautiful
Score distribution:
1,663 music reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Sleep Mountain isn’t entirely unenjoyable; its two main crimes are that it’s too safe with its simple chord patterns and unimaginative riffs, and that it’s too in thrall to the records that have inspired it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    It is, quite frankly, tedious and utterly un-inspiring, lacking any serious ability to convey the emotive forces which I would hope drove the song writing processes. [Review of UK release The Future Is Medieval]
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    In the end it's hard to fathom just who is going to really love this album.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    Awful.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Synths take a higher precedence this time round: it’s an indie-pop record, far from their post-hardcore roots; indeed Living in Song sounds like an Architecture in Helsinki knockoff. But even when you can hear the band trying out new things, it simply sounds turgid.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    Apparently The Wombats only managed to write the one song for the album and so have decided to just repeat it ten times, offering little-to-no variation in tone or tempo--although to be fair to them, they do stick a different synth preset on for each song so you can tell them apart.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    A 55-minute mess called Curtis, undoubtedly one of this year’s worst releases.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There's no debating in my mind that Digitalism have the potential to produce an album even better than Idealism. But sadly, I Love You, Dude is not it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    It is samey, ugly and spectacularly stupid at the same time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Lyrically it’s weak, and the over-polished studio buffing does nothing to emancipate the blueprint that is, essentially, the same as it was 17 years ago.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's not too hard to imagine the Saunders sisters staring aimlessly while some confused producers shuffle the cards until randomly finding their rhythmic groove. And that's the worst think about this record: constantly thinking of the word studio when you're trying to invest some emotion.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    F.A.M.E. is a vile, despicable album that doesn't deserve to be supported in any way, shape or form. Its very existence is a frightening indictment of our times, in terms of our attitudes to music, women and the cult of celebrity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    Liam Lynch is about as funny as the plague, and even that had its moments in Monty Python. This doesn't have any.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The occasional highlight isn't enough to make up for the cloth-eared versions of timeless songs found elsewhere on the record, or to cover up for the fact that See My Friends is a mostly soulless, and an entirely pointless album.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    This album is a carbon copy of Vampire Weekend, but you know how when Gus Van Sant remade Psycho shot for shot and it was rubbish? It's like that.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Quite frankly, it's f**king boring.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    Conveniently, he’s premeditated every song in #willpower with a bevy of wishy-washy, quotable clichés that are meant to fit the space of 140 characters. Sadly, that's as deep as it gets.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    Owl City is electro-pop's unwanted bastard child, combining all the worst elements of the genre. The production is lazy and unbelievably dull.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    After half a decade away, If Not Now, When? really does feel like a misstep. Hopefully a little creative control can be wrestled away from Boyd in the future, otherwise a much under-rated band really could be lost forever.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The album aims for Grohl-esque rock anthems, but falls short mostly due to a lack of melodic gifts; given that, it needs many more musical ideas than it has to keep anybody interested.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The album does have one redeeming aspect preventing its plunge into epic echelons of suck, and that's lead single Party Rock Anthem.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    Polished to the point of being nausea-inducing, this album has been packaged to a precise remit: robotic, stadium-rock-lite that follows the tried and tested formula of acoustic quiet bit, drums come in, second verse, chorus, repeat to fade so strictly that you’ll feel like banging your head against a brick wall and/or adding your own beat-box percussion.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    The record sounds phoned in, plain and simple, and its awkward concessions to cliche, its trash heap lyrical conceits, and its dopey production have a cumulative effect that would be insulting if it weren’t so transparently uninspired and uninteresting.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 10 Critic Score
    For what it is, it may in fact be quite good. But, to her discarded fans, at least, she's given the ultimate finger.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Critic Score
    The derivativeness quickly overwhelms.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 0 Critic Score
    This album is an abomination. It's a rancid pile of regurgitated tripe.