NOW Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,215 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Until the Quiet Comes
Lowest review score: 20 Afterparty Babies
Score distribution:
2,215 music reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Depeche Mode have dropped the best album of their career.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    You can spend hours dismantling Sunbather and cooking up a neat sub-sub-genre for it (post-black-metal-gaze-death-dreamcore-whatever). Or you can just call it one of the year’s best records.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Uzu
    The five-piece Montreal/Toronto noise-pop band keep things compositionally complex throughout, and each song rolls seamlessly into the next.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Free of misguided anger but with healthy amounts of trademark anxiety and angular riffs, Grace’s expression is powerful.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Illmatic is timeless because of Nas’s introspective, hyper-detailed approach to his daily life--even to moments that don’t seem particularly notable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    At 18 tracks, Honest doesn’t feel bloated. Future takes his time on slow, sensitive jams.... But for every tender ballad, there’s a classic Future banger in which he yelps the hook over and over, lest you forget it, on top of harsh beats.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    She gives everything, and it’s impossible to be unmoved.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A master class in School of Iommi doom metal.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Throw in some elegant, economical strings arranged by Owen Pallett and touches of harmonica, vibraphone and sax and you’ve got the best 32 minutes of music you’ll hear anytime soon.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A chameleon with an endless stream of alter egos and the vocal chops to pull them all off.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Both emcees are incredibly versatile, switching up speed, style and tone, playing off each other one minute, one-upping each other the next.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The writing here is sharp and stunning, but the real difference between this and other Cat Power discs is that The Greatest has room to breathe.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At times, Cash nails the knife-edge of hurt and love so adeptly, you feel like you're intruding on too-personal confessions.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The record is rife with brow-raising darts and the mindblowing beats to match, outstripping the last two Dilated records and threatening the alignment of your neck vertebrae in the process.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is absurd, confusing (the random sequencing can be a bitch if you're trying to follow individual plots), hilarious (only Merritt could pen a libretto titled What A Fucking Lovely Day!) and bloody brilliant.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Amazingly, though Elan Vital easily could've become their resounding Sandinista flop, Zollo's clean vocals, knife-sharp melodies and subtle politically charged songwriting help secure its nomination as Pretty Girls' London Calling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While sometimes dreamy and ethereal, South are able to bridge quieter moments with danceable, gloomy pop – simply speaking, a great achievement.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A densely tangled masterpiece that floods and floors by straddling swaggering grooves and boggling cacophony.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the more interesting – and fun – cover albums out there.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    These are explosive epics that don't get tired, tied together in an album that's both instantly accessible and grows on you over time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    That the music of Beyond rocks so righteously in a way that sounds like a conscious progression from where they left off with Bug, rather than a misguided attempt to recreate the past, makes this unlikely recording comeback all the more incredible.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A huge improvement over Alligator, and likely to launch the band into a new phase.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A shockingly good batch of rock, pop and punk tunes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She benefits from solid production by Saddle Creek staple Mike Mogis, who tweaks her retro sound with synths and electronic blips, but it's the stark M. Ward-produced tracks that, while more traditional, showcase the Dolly Parton potential in Lewis's voice.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    GBV fans should definitely check this one out – there's a lot to like.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Long-time fans might be a bit weirded out by the shift, but a few seconds hearing Ditto channel Peggy Lee on the smoky torch burner Coal To Diamonds should assuage their fears.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their riff-heavy songs are brashly delivered – favouring attitude over technique – but it's Turner's keenly observed vignettes of bored text-messaging teens that really connect.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Orton has a tendency to mimic her own melodies, she explores jazz structures here in engaging, exciting ways, and the indigent heartland iconography of her lyrics is beautiful without being cloying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's Collett's ability to lyrically and aurally crystallize moments in time that makes this album such a delight.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An exciting and often unexpected listen.