NOW Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,146 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Black River Killer [EP]
Lowest review score: 20 Anywhere I Lay My Head
Score distribution:
2,146 music reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Depeche Mode have dropped the best album of their career.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    You can spend hours dismantling Sunbather and cooking up a neat sub-sub-genre for it (post-black-metal-gaze-death-dreamcore-whatever). Or you can just call it one of the year’s best records.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Uzu
    The five-piece Montreal/Toronto noise-pop band keep things compositionally complex throughout, and each song rolls seamlessly into the next.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Free of misguided anger but with healthy amounts of trademark anxiety and angular riffs, Grace’s expression is powerful.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Illmatic is timeless because of Nas’s introspective, hyper-detailed approach to his daily life--even to moments that don’t seem particularly notable.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    At 18 tracks, Honest doesn’t feel bloated. Future takes his time on slow, sensitive jams.... But for every tender ballad, there’s a classic Future banger in which he yelps the hook over and over, lest you forget it, on top of harsh beats.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    She gives everything, and it’s impossible to be unmoved.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The writing here is sharp and stunning, but the real difference between this and other Cat Power discs is that The Greatest has room to breathe.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At times, Cash nails the knife-edge of hurt and love so adeptly, you feel like you're intruding on too-personal confessions.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The record is rife with brow-raising darts and the mindblowing beats to match, outstripping the last two Dilated records and threatening the alignment of your neck vertebrae in the process.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is absurd, confusing (the random sequencing can be a bitch if you're trying to follow individual plots), hilarious (only Merritt could pen a libretto titled What A Fucking Lovely Day!) and bloody brilliant.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Amazingly, though Elan Vital easily could've become their resounding Sandinista flop, Zollo's clean vocals, knife-sharp melodies and subtle politically charged songwriting help secure its nomination as Pretty Girls' London Calling.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While sometimes dreamy and ethereal, South are able to bridge quieter moments with danceable, gloomy pop – simply speaking, a great achievement.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A densely tangled masterpiece that floods and floors by straddling swaggering grooves and boggling cacophony.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the more interesting – and fun – cover albums out there.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    These are explosive epics that don't get tired, tied together in an album that's both instantly accessible and grows on you over time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    That the music of Beyond rocks so righteously in a way that sounds like a conscious progression from where they left off with Bug, rather than a misguided attempt to recreate the past, makes this unlikely recording comeback all the more incredible.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A huge improvement over Alligator, and likely to launch the band into a new phase.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A shockingly good batch of rock, pop and punk tunes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She benefits from solid production by Saddle Creek staple Mike Mogis, who tweaks her retro sound with synths and electronic blips, but it's the stark M. Ward-produced tracks that, while more traditional, showcase the Dolly Parton potential in Lewis's voice.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    GBV fans should definitely check this one out – there's a lot to like.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Long-time fans might be a bit weirded out by the shift, but a few seconds hearing Ditto channel Peggy Lee on the smoky torch burner Coal To Diamonds should assuage their fears.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their riff-heavy songs are brashly delivered – favouring attitude over technique – but it's Turner's keenly observed vignettes of bored text-messaging teens that really connect.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Orton has a tendency to mimic her own melodies, she explores jazz structures here in engaging, exciting ways, and the indigent heartland iconography of her lyrics is beautiful without being cloying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's Collett's ability to lyrically and aurally crystallize moments in time that makes this album such a delight.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An exciting and often unexpected listen.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the sheer density of Bejar's writing can be overwhelming, Destroyer's Rubies is, on a musical level, the most 'accessible' disc he's released in years.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Case's overzealous self-production means there are layers upon layers to every track, which sometimes works to her detriment.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if his singing never touches Damon Albarn's, he seems confident in his voice, using his shortcomings to his advantage to burn through 13 tracks inspired by a passion for late-70s Brit punk.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These guys are passionate about what they're doing.