Paste Magazine's Scores

For 2,947 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Pacific Ocean Blue [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 10 Songs From Black Mountain
Score distribution:
2947 music reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    This is Noel’s strongest work post-Oasis...maybe even Liam.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It’s easy to coast, but Bitchin Bajas consistently strive. It’s a pleasure to try to keep up with ‘em.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    It’s the originals that shine the most, a testament to the talent of a songwriter that has written a standard or two of his own.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 79 Critic Score
    Throughout much of the album, Xeno and Dust sound stuck between pop and avant garde. Here, the commit to the latter, with promising results. That’s Xenoula in a nutshell: Often weird. Oddly pretty. Always full of promise.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Like Charlotte Gainsbourg’s entire musical career, Rest is imperfect, but it’s intriguing enough that you can’t help but pay attention. And now that she’s pouring more of herself into her songs, her work feels weightier, more complex, and more compelling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    The bottom line with The Greatest Gift is predictable. Big Sufjan fans need it, others probably don’t.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Depending on where you fall on a scale from one to hardcore fan, this creates either a masterful, cohesive soundscape--or a monotonous departure from the frenzied, fuzzed-out energy of Dwyer’s most well-known songs.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 51 Critic Score
    Mmost frustrating about this album are the shades of old Morrissey.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    So Black is a heavy record, but there are bright moments sprinkled throughout.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Soul Of A Woman offers up a piece of everything that made Jones a powerhouse up to the very end.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Moments of levity (“The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite” and “Man On The Moon”) and righteous anger (“Ignoreland”) cleared the sinuses but otherwise, the tone of Automatic is marked by doughy pressure and woozy beauty. The remastered version of the LP brings that to the fore as well as emphasizing the skin-tingling intimacy of Michael Stipe’s vocals throughout. ... This expanded edition of the album (three CDs and a blu-ray disc featuring all the promotional videos and the album mixed in Dolby ATMOS) offers a more fully-rounded understanding of Automatic.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This band can make a brisk song feel expansive, and it knows how to inject a slow song with unmistakable urgency. You don’t learn how to do that... or at least it’s not easy to learn it. You just have it. Gun Outfit has it, and they wield it with great skill.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 74 Critic Score
    Wild & Reckless takes a couple steps in the right direction. This band’s optimum path, however, is still several steps away.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Unapologetically gains in strength as it goes along, mirroring Ballerini’s push away from a particular lover and towards the welcoming arms of a new beau.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 76 Critic Score
    If Phases proves anything, it’s that Olsen’s discards are better than a lot of artists’ best efforts. Like her name suggests, she seems otherworldly, celestial--her impressive consistency and ability to transcend genre and era with seeming ease, nothing short of divine.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    While bedroom indie-rock is a beast Shamir has yet to master, it’s Revelations’ message of survival and optimism that sticks with you. And so one hopes Shamir finds his way, fully realizing the album’s flashes of greatness.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    She has put in the time to master her instrument of choice, and she combines that mastery with top-shelf compositional skills. As a result, she sounds like no one else.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    As a whole, Queens of the Breakers holds fast to hope and shows both a continuation and an evolution for one of the most creative bands out there today.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The only potential drawback to The Weather Station is that Lindeman’s mastery of rich melodies can sometimes overshadow her narrative lyrics. Her voice becomes another vital instrumental line in the pastiche, so it takes multiple alert listens (and ideally, a lyric sheet) to fully realize the album’s depth. Luckily, the album’s sweet, yet confident musicality encourages repeated spins
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The Wild seems to have made good on the band’s original intent. And yet, for all its unhinged energy, ragged refrains and frayed edges (Edenloff’s punk-like ramble on “Dead/Alive”) it’s surprisingly cohesive even in the midst of kinetic compulsion. Consider this both edgy and essential.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    An album that feels like a logical next step for the Memphis singer-songwriter, but never overreaches. And overreaching would’ve been easy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Not every cut is a revelation, but when Shane is on, she’s on.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Backwater might just reel in listeners strongly enough that they take deep dives into each and every track individually. And even then, Kllo’s mystery remains intact.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Cramming what should be an unworkable heap of concepts and sounds into a deliciously volatile 35 minutes, Nothing Valley is a bracing blend of scraping noise and tender melody, not unlike the recipe used by Speedy Ortiz.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    By releasing these two projects at once, it seems as if Luna are overcompensating for a lack of new fully fledged songs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Although Carry Fire seemingly follows the same formula as his previous effort with the Space Shifters, 2014’s Lullaby and…The Ceaseless Roar, his sound is ever-changing, experimenting with the science of otherworldly instrumentation.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    So while Undivided Heart & Soul explores both the past and the future of roots music, McPherson shines brightest when he blends both influences to stay rooted in the present.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The sophomore record sounds like a concept album about change: changing relationships, changing surroundings, changing perspectives and changing within oneself, often without even realizing it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Somehow, she makes gothic folk, gloomy doom and grim noise feel above ground. The odds of these kinds of sounds bubbling up into the mainstream are slim, to be sure. But on Hiss Spun, Chelsea Wolfe makes it imaginable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    As both a quintessential entry into his catalog and a striking entry into mainstream popular culture, Colors once again cements Beck as a clever, ever-dynamic and enduring artist.