Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,431 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Illinois
Lowest review score: 10 Songs From Black Mountain
Score distribution:
2,431 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    AM
    Arctic Monkeys arrive at the end of AM a lot wiser than they may have appeared from the slow opening stomp of the LP.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Whether exposing light or dark, or some blank hue in the middle, Barnes has all but bulls-eyed his status as a brilliantly daring artist on Lousy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Spanning 22 tracks and the great sprawl of a nation, Big Wheel and Others compiles more of these vital impressions than any of McCombs’ previous releases, documenting something so damned beautifully alive--so restless and sensual and swinging and true--the album accrues power by virtue of its breadth.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    If you don’t like country music, don’t bother. But if you do have an ear for Waylon and Willie and the boys, then you’ll find plenty to love.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    LP1
    With both immediate appeal and density that demands long-term digestion, it’s one of those rare debuts that manifests a fully-grown, deeply engaging sound.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Left to his own devices without any interference from outside interests, and an astounding album of dark, sultry music like this is what you get in return.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Browne has always led a double life: sensitive singer/songwriter and committed activist. During his 40-year career, there’s been a tug of war between the romantic poet and the surging outcry. On Standing In The Breach, his first album since 2008’s Time The Conqueror, the Southern California soft rock icon seamlessly reconciles the two.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    This is an album that is custom-built to be experienced in one 41-minute sitting, either with a pair of headphones on marveling at every sonic swan dive or laid in the background to guide you through a task. In either setting, Vision Fortune is your ideal soundtrack.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Sprinter crackles and explodes, with a dynamic range that’d make Steve Albini blush.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Throughout her multi-decade-long career, Grammy-winning Lynne has combined eras, influences and genres to create a sound familiar, yet unique. Imagine continues in that tradition.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Recalibrated as a looser, more energetic band, The Helio Sequence has created a euphoric, career-defining album.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Working with Lukas Nelson’s Promise of the Real, Young’s urgency is infused with youthful intensity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Feels Like is a debut of the same melodic stripes as Weezer’s Blue Album, and it comes as a package deal with all the emotional honesty and intensity of their Pinkerton.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Okkervil River itself performs here with an organic ease that’s dramatic without reaching for histrionics, continuing to tattoo its rough folkish flesh with Motown horns, power-pop overdrive and chugging New Wave bass.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Elegiac by intent, the record is awash in poignancy, radiating from the deeply felt guitar and vocal performances of the 83-year-old King and his supporting band (anchored by drummer Jim Keltner, bassist Nathan East and pianist Dr. John) and from the carefully chosen material.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Both anxious and anthemic, the third most famous band from Leeds, England (behind Gang of Four and the Mekons) lobs social commentary as sharp as drummer Nick Hodgson’s ties, and tackles subjects as brainy as evolutionary biology ('Like It Too Much,'), the tenets of self-help ('Tomato In the Rain') and gender politics ('Remember You’re A Girl'), all at breakneck speed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Nine albums and eight years in, it’s time to stop trying to figure out what the hell Animal Collective--vocalist/guitarist Avey Tare, percussionist/vocalist Panda Bear and knob-twiddler Geologist--is, and just enjoy the orgasmic rush of danceable rock.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Their new record Blue Lights On The Runway has the potential to turn X1 into a stateside #1.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Andy Votel’s encyclopedic liner notes and a Gainsbourg interview make this version the definitive reissue for the as-yet unsullied.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The young band has learned a great secret: It’s possible to make a massive, commercial, go-for-the-gusto Rock Record while still holding on to dark idiosyncrasies and seriousness of purpose.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Underneath the orchestral flourishes and children’s choirs, beneath even the frequent textural shifts and melodic detours, are a set of melodies that find new ways to cut straight to the listener every time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The singer/songwriter takes the back seat and lets the college kids channel their inner Folds, and they successfully do so--often stealing the spotlight away from Folds.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is an album that knocks you over at first. But when you gather yourself, get back on your feet and listen again, you'll want to hit the play button a second time.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The official release of Nirvana’s headlining performance at the 1992 Reading Festival feels at once indescribable and quaint.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This unrelenting but beautiful melancholy forms the glut of Courage. Beauty is key here, especially with a song like “Bring Down,” where an otherwise depressing dirge is given liftoff by Smith’s sweet harmony and a twittering flute.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    "The enemy is everywhere" is The Monitor's twice-invoked refrain, the central thesis of an album that's both uncompromisingly bleak and impossible to ignore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Jack and Meg careen from riff to riff, idea to idea, clinging for dear life as they dig their spurs into the mythical rodeo beast of rock ’n’ roll. Their lean guitar-and-drums approach allows them to turn on a dime, following any stormy muse they please.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The ArchAndroid is a fully immersive, theatrical experience. It's a near-perfect R&B album; hell, it's a fantastic hip-hop, psychedelic, neo-soul, dance and orchestral album too.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The album is saturated with high poly-harmonies, finger-snaps and hand claps, but the Charles Atlas-invoking title communicates Wavves' real agenda--"nyah-nyah" pop sucker-punches, sunny smiles so forced they come off as sneers, intense self-deprecation as psychic body armor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The production is bright and clear, and the arrangements showcase the star.