Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,306 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 London Calling [25th Anniversary Legacy Edition]
Lowest review score: 10 Songs From Black Mountain
Score distribution:
2,306 music reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Danger Mouse’s fingerprints are all over all of these songs, and it’s easy to see parallels with some of his other projects, but in many ways Evil Friends is the most quintessentially Portugal. The Man album the band has released. It’s also undoubtedly their best.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Old
    He has wound up producing an album that transcends much of the typical hype bullshit and seems destined to stand as a unifying record, leaving no one asking for Danny Brown’s resume when he receives his share of the spotlight, making his sense of humor an ingredient rather than the whole meal.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Devine blends folk, punk, rock and pop sounds into songs with intricate guitar parts reminiscent of Elliott Smith and flowing melodies that can’t help but stay in your head.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Get There, is a thoughtful, interesting record (about what it means to be thoughtful and interesting).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    These pseudo-mashups expand Elverum’s vision to a Cinerama-like depth of field with the picture beautifully warping around the edges. Whatever Elverum’s true intentions with this release, it certainly has a welcome place in his vast and varied discography.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Vile’s insight is the relaxed current on which It’s A Big World floats, an unexpected testament to one of the year’s best albums, and a compelling work of its own.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    As powerful a witness for the region--Memphis, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas--as it is a lovely quilt of musicality, braiding blues, folk, Appalachia, rock and old-timey country, this is balm for lost souls, alienated creatures seeking their core truths and intellectuals who love the cool mist of vespers in the hearts of people they may never encounter.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Crain has invited the listener to eavesdrop on her internal and often contradictory dialogues. That she’s able to do so without shame is one of Kid Face’s crowning achievements and more evidence of Crain’s brilliant, though still-developing talents.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It’s a quietly sublime work from a group of musicians who have always insisted--via their straight-up goofy music videos, Budweiser references and substitute teacher-like appearances--they’re just average suburbanites.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    From a purely sonic standpoint, these new versions are impossible to disregard.... The bonus material on Led Zeppelin II and III is more revelatory, showcasing the band’s creative process through assorted alternate takes and rough mixes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    This was, at least until two days ago, the most ambitious and powerful underground hip-hop album to be released this year. But leave it to Death Grips to drop a surprise record on us and steal the spotlight from their fellow Californians. We’ll have to wait before we find out which one stands the test of time, but for the moment, advantage: Clipping.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Eschewing Smithsonian properness, Remedy channels youth in all its freewheeling glory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Yes, Braid is still a guitar-forward post-punk powerhouse, and No Coast is a great addition to its catalog, even possibly containing some of the best material the band has ever written.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It’s their most immediate album--but not necessarily their simplest.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Her voice instantly captivates, radiating both power and sophistication on 11 tracks that vary wildly in tone.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Whether imitation is truly the sincerest form of flattery―and other cliches―as it pertains to this third album in the Foxygen catalog is up for debate. If it’s some secret genius, the jury is still decidedly out. Either way, you’ll want to hear this one for yourself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    There is most certainly a parallel universe in which Emilana Torrini is the Next Big Thing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Amid its admirably complex compositional compressions, Skeletal Lamping feels like a triple-LP sprawler, despite clocking in at less than an hour. For those who have the patience to hang with Barnes and his freak-outs, it could be a masterpiece.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Rarely does a track on this set demand skipping, and even the scant missteps are worth at least a few listens--like any great band, the JAMC lived and learned.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    If she has more misanthropic stuff like this up her A Camp sleeve? Hey-forget the Cardigans, and bring it on.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The album’s meditations on what follows the mortal coil are as sweeping as the gulf between its genres, but both are handled with rewardingly nuanced subtlety.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    'It Ain't Gonna Save Me'--inarguably one of the best tracks to date from the Memphis punk rocker born Jay Lindsey--seethes melodic vitriol with its breathless guitars and lyrics about shitting clouds. It's the high point of Watch Me Fall, but the rest of the record hardly slouches.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The album drags at points; with 22 tracks and a 70-minute runtime, some of this material would have been better off on a mixtape. But that’s a minor flaw in an otherwise superbly-executed gangster epic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    This whole album is good, just know that up front.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    On their second LP, the youngsters don't disappoint.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The album is both affirmative and entertaining, addressing themes of political upheaval, reconciliation and the ignorance that so often comes with privilege.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It's too early to start drafting up those Best of 2011 lists, but City of Refuge deserves to be shortlisted as one of the stronger folk albums in recent memory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It's the lyrics that make Smart Flesh truly shine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Rather than hone the traditional Appalachian discipline, the sensualist singer explores the possibilities of acoustic/roots music--conjuring songscapes, erotic tableau and enough tension to hold listeners transfixed throughout Follow Me Down.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The cadences, demeanors and vocal tones certainly add an interesting wrinkle to Eno's dynamic, but a few exceptions aside, I'm generally too enraptured in his rich compositions to decipher the staggered wordplay.