Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,626 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 London Calling [25th Anniversary Legacy Edition]
Lowest review score: 10 Songs From Black Mountain
Score distribution:
2626 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    They're so determined to conjure a gothic America and its black-and-white morality that they fail to acknowledge the grace and sophistication of their source material.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    Here winds up an album of originals, sung by the people who wrote them, but somehow resembling more than anything else a campfire sing-along of someone else's songs.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    Trouble Man is less senile in general than "Hello," but for too many of the album's 71 minutes, we listen in horror as T.I., 32, tries flaccidly to get down with the kids.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    What we're left with is an EP full of hollow gestures. But at least it's an EP instead of an LP.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    On Astro Coast Pitts stared at the bright, unwritten future in front of him, but on Pythons he’s locked in place, rendered motionless by the oppressive chip on his shoulder.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    The bulk of Roadhouse Sun, however, hews too closely to bland bar rock, as if they’re drinking Bud Lights instead of Shiner Bocks.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Russian Circles pummel too politely.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    But the overproduction and studio gimmickry haunts the halls of this collegiate rock, constraining Hynes’ squeaky-clean instrumentation between alternating tedium and banality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    The concept was ambitious but, unfortunately, in releasing Tomorrow as an album, the team divorces the music from the stage and leaves the songs stranded in a mire of effects and noise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    Combining swelling '60s throwback harmonies and the sweet, swift wit of '50s songwriting, they parlay clichéd notions into winning melodies.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    The bad news: Los Lonely Boys are much better players than they are songwriters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 48 Critic Score
    BE
    [The] familiarity brings you to the cereal, the soap and the market, and some people will be drawn to Be, okay with seeing the imitation. The rest are better holding off for Oasis’ inevitable reformation.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 47 Critic Score
    There are flashes of the brilliance that made the youngster such a trendy buzzname, but it's hard work wading through the awkward muck.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 46 Critic Score
    The result is an awkward balancing act between a premature lust for accessibility and an obvious knack for the avant-garde, shirking traces of the latter in an ill-fated attempt at evolution.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 46 Critic Score
    Here the Get Up Kids sound a bit confused and rusty, making There Are Rules a late career footnote of limited urgency.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 46 Critic Score
    Everything from the stilted production to Manson's lyrics to that awful album cover seems hopelessly mired in 1998.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    Progression doesn't make a convincing argument for rap's return to the golden era. Instead, it feels a bit too grumpy and too reliant upon the good ol' days.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the only thing that The Temper Trap's self-titled album proves is that they may have been a one-hit wonder all along.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 44 Critic Score
    The album comes off as polished, tasteful and static, like a still-life, beset with predictable melodies and proficient but less than electrifying vocal performances.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 43 Critic Score
    Too bad the epitaph’s already scrawled in Chinese Democracy’s anachronistic margins: a bottomless pit dug by disposable income, a persecution complex and egomania.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 43 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, they miss and it lands in the five-day-old dregs of a keg in an Anytown, USA backyard.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 43 Critic Score
    While intimate and personal in nature, Piano combines minimalistic instrumentation with simplistic lyrics and makes for an album that turns lackluster as a whole.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Little Boots’ problem may be that there’s little left to add to her genre: The synth-pop revival has nearly exhausted itself, and Hands ends up sounding like a B-sides collection cherry-picked from the catalogs of Kylie Minogue and Girls Aloud.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Track after track is slathered in layers of horns and guitars and synths until the songs underneath are no longer discernible.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, an undertaking as complicated as Dr Dee needs all the accessibility that would-be fans can get. And instead it's nothing more than rabbit-hole music for Dr. Damon.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Technical proficiency is overrated. Taste has to account for something, which means Eminem isn’t the Jimi Hendrix of hip hop. Instead, he’s in danger of becoming Yngwie Malmsteen: incredibly agile yet musically soulless. He says a lot of nothing on MMLP2, but I guess you can admire the way he says it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 41 Critic Score
    As much of Freaky wallows in the jokes, the record runs out of ideas astonishingly early.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Night on Fire is going to need a gifted remixer to transform it into the dance-floor-packer it aspires to be.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Instantly forgettable. [#16, p.139]
    • Paste Magazine
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Hopefully next time he'll challenge himself to expand his palette and realize more of his considerable potential. [Oct/Nov 2005, p.138]
    • Paste Magazine