Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,529 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 67% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Score distribution:
2529 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    At 26, Musgraves has kept her wonder, honed her focus and remained true to her core.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Currents is a record you should be excited for, paying attention to and ready to consider the best of the year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Girl Band’s latest is a startling upending of any and all expectations you would dare place upon a modern rock group.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Here, he dresses his music in full regalia--with whistles, horns, organs and marching-band drums--and it’s exquisite.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    The production overall is impeccable and the sequencing shrewd; the tracks feel visceral and visual--you can almost see them as they hurtle by. The album’s overall effect is less deafening than blinding.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    While it’s certainly still working for him now—This Is Happening is, in all respects, LCD’s best album—it doesn’t take much to imagine the act becoming a tired gag a couple more albums down the line.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Treats is just a whole goddamn lot of fun to listen to. It's a supremely raw and visceral pop masterwork, one appropriate to rocking out with headphones on, windows-down bumping on car stereos, four-A.M. warehouse dance parties and countless other summer moments that'll soon have soundtracks courtesy of Sleigh Bells.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Kiss Each Other Clean has the potential to please longtime fans and generate plenty of new ones.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    It's just so utterly satisfying.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    From the first sung note of Hummingbird, Local Natives are frank in their presentation of a serious album, challenging listeners to heal along with them; cognizant that investment is proportional to remuneration.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Powerfully, the evolution of the songcraft on Muchacho doesn’t arrive as a random left turn but instead progresses directly out of Phosphorescent’s own canon.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Don’t blink--no mere mid-career album, Monomania registers as an absolute impact event, a massive dirty blast marking the moment Deerhunter’s steady trajectory spins out of control.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Sleeper is an album worthy of adorning your shelf until the shelf itself crumbles.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Transgender Dysphoria Blues is a perfect storm of great songwriting paired with some timely, frank admissions from Grace.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Olsen shares graciously in her music, and if you are willing, Burn a Fire for No Witness will change your world. Or, actually, it will change how you see your world.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Boy
    It’s another glorious achievement for an artist who has created so much amazing art since arriving into the world fully formed way back in 1982.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    There is no end to the nuances and subtleties that lay within. Find your starting point and start exploring.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Sylvan Esso is as cerebral as it is sexy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    For the ruminating about the world and wanderlust, lullaby’s potency comes from affairs of the heart, love lost and sought, and the jagged loneliness of failing to stay bonded.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    This is an album about vision, movement and manifestation. It’s about removing oneself from the familiar to tap into the brain’s ability to create unprecedented and inspiring art. Success.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Each track deserves mention. Knowing Superchunk, Diarrhea Planet, Ben Kweller, Andrew Bird & Nora O’Connor, Mike Watt and the Missingmen are just a few of the other stand-outs shows why Bloodshot, two decades in, remains so compelling.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    The most fascinating aspect of this collection is how the artistic scales within the band tipped back and forth in these early days before they found the true balance that carried them through the six studio albums they made post-1984. Within this box set, it takes all eight discs to get to that point, but the moment-by-moment journey is a fascinating one marked with some remarkable pop songs.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    It’s a true piece of art, and we’re lucky Godspeed You! Black Emperor gave listeners a proper document.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Beyond the approach that Ceremony is taking on The L-Shaped Man musically--a simmering post-punk sound that evokes the best of that genre’s late ‘70s/early ‘80s heyday--you can’t get away from the pain and despair that vocalist Ross Farrar experienced. He simply won’t let you.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    True to the tone of the record, Bowie is almost a spectre throughout [Blackstar].
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Adult work, Ghosts hits the gut, the soul and the grey matter.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Little Honey finds Williams in celebratory mode, with raucous rock, bluesy testimonies and tongue-in-cheek twang.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    With Fire on Corridor X, All the Saints seem less interested in renovating the house that noise built than burning the whole thing to the ground.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    This is a marching band that’s veered way out of formation, and is making utterly original music.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Like "The Pirate's Gospel," her cruelly unheralded 2006 debut, To Be Still is a staggering meditation on the idea of home in its many forms, and shares its predecessor's knowing heart--young, but already familiar with the tugging weights of time, family and love.