Paste Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,229 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Illinois
Lowest review score: 10 Songs From Black Mountain
Score distribution:
2,229 music reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Privilege (Abridged) takes on immediately recognizable appearances, but Pennington doesn’t just walk through each number; he partners with them, parading the words and music in and out of dynamic perspective.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Cruise Your Illusion is a record that will likely be spinning on turntables well into the future.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Modern Vampires is Rostam Batmanglij’s album. Like a character actor stealing the movie from the lead, he pretty much owns these songs, filling them with eccentric flourishes of sound that are both jarring and perfect.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    In the end, Ultraviolet may not be the best metal album of 2013, but it’s definitely the 2013 metal album you’d most be a fool to ignore.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The result is the purest late-night album that Camera Obscura has recorded yet.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The duo impressively join a raft of other legacy artists (David Bowie, Black Sabbath) in proving that getting older doesn’t mean you have to lose your passion for creativity or, in the case of Electric, your libido.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    That this collaboration would end up working so well should really be of little surprise to longtime fans of Costello. His ‘70s and ’80s work often bore the influence of the same R&B, soul and funk records that the Roots clearly adore.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Creative movements make Bitter Rivals an exciting and powerful record, because it reminds the listener that sometimes it’s okay to follow an idea into unexpected territory and shake things up.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    If this is a new avenue of self-loathing for Kasher, it’s a welcome change of form from the perhaps more angular output of his screaming past. His gifts for wrangling emotive detours from unlikely sonic realms is his best talent, but he couldn’t do that without his crafty capacity for language, too. Stripped of the angry adornments of his yesteryears, we now may take him at his word.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Don’t Tell The Driver spends the whole of its hour-long running time in what feels like a slow melt, with melodies sliding down its surface alluringly.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    bEEdEEgEE makes it apparent that Brian Degraw has a future with or without Gang Gang Dance, as this solo album can rival any of his previously released heights.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Although cobbled from six different shows, Live at the Cellar Door sounds like a cohesive entity. The recordings have been remastered with such love; each string on Young’s acoustic rings with clarity and weight, and each crack in his voice stings with resonance. And yet, a distant haze pervades the record that could convince listeners that this is an actual bootleg on wax.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It’s a document that is crucial to anyone working to understand the evolution of the UK music scene and a welcome addition to the library of any discerning pop fan.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Teeth Dreams is the first time since Boys & Girls in America that The Hold Steady toes that perfect line between adolescent, backseat make-out sessions and stoned, intellectual discourse on the human condition.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The disjointed nature of Under Color’s thrust somehow catapults its enjoyability.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Watson and Taylor still communicate better than most bands or friends could hope to achieve. But they’ve finally let the listener into Slow Club’s emotional core, making the kind of songs that aren’t just meant to score feelings, but actually make the listener feel.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    After the End is just the type of record that could remain on a loop far longer than its running time without wearing out its welcome.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Oxford Collapse is uncommonly muscular for this type of band, rather like Les Savy Fav by way of R.E.M., and they’re most engaging when flexing this muscle
    • 78 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Death Magnetic is more than a paean to all things thrash--it’s the revivification of ambition dormant for nearly two decades.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Staunch admirers of the traditional Pretenders sound might not like this record, but I say, “Yee-haw!”
    • 74 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    When taken alongside recent successes like Chaos and Creation and his stunning orchestral piece Ece Cor Meum, Electric Arguments hints that a late period renaissance could be underway.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The lion's share of Incredibad is without a doubt one of the funniest albums, music or otherwise, in years.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The basic ingredients here--a sexy, intelligent singer and songwriter, a guy who wants to be a guitar god and a drummer who socks the hell out of his kit--come fairly close to defining my notion of perfect music. Together they make a triple-layer torch-song/New Wave/power-pop confection.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    In short, arguably for the first time, Oberst gives us an album rife with liveliness--and it sounds like he had a damn good time making it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    That sense of musical evolution makes Around the Well a particularly compelling listening, and Beam’s sensitive readings of songs by Stereolab, the Flaming Lips, the Postal Service, and New Order show how sturdy his sound can be, as he translates them to quieter settings without losing their heraldic sentiments.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    The restless vibe to this ramshackle collection suggests Rawlings’ greatest trait is his wanderlust. It’s allowed him to work closely with a range of different artists in the past, and it makes A Friend of a Friend a spirited affair.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Know Better Learn Faster mostly sounds like a young artist coming into her own--in music and life and love.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Jones and the Dap-Kings make the kind of music that moves them, and their feverish passion is contagious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    All of Houck's southern eccentricities remain gloriously intact, from his eloquently hangdog vocals to his minimalist songwriting on "Hej, Me I'm Light."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Ghosts skirts its predecessor's instrumental self-indulgence, allowing its tracks to swim in grandeur--but not drown.