People Weekly's Scores

  • TV
For 1,020 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 14% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Smash: Season 1
Lowest review score: 16 Snoops: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 740
  2. Negative: 0 out of 740
740 tv reviews
  1. You may well have misgivings about yet another season for this show, particularly with Haysbert out of the picture. ... But the plot, which involves the abduction of a high government official, will absorb viewers once again.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Devotees are probably poised to dismiss the adaptation out of hand, but I found enough funny business here to overcome my sales resistance.
  2. In its second season this gritty frontier drama still boasts the most colorfully eccentric ensemble of any show on TV. But Al Swearengen, the malignly glowering saloon boss, played to the hilt by Golden Globe winner Ian McShane, is first among equals.
  3. The fast-paced craziness has a hit-or-miss quality, but I'm still laughing at the thought of an action flick pairing Jim Caviezel's Jesus with motor-mouth Chris Tucker.
  4. It's always good to see dancing that's dancing and not a montage of repositioned limbs.
  5. It's a much more impressive spectacle than ABC's mindlessly entertaining Empire.
  6. Two tense, tricky, fine performances [22 Jul 2013]
    • People Weekly
  7. It's trite and obvious, and meant to be, with songs that are shallow, sunny and snappy.... Just Go with it. [22 Jul 2013, p.48]
    • People Weekly
  8. [The Newsroom] is much stronger and more solidly entertaining. [29 Jul 2013, p.37]
    • People Weekly
  9. The history behind the story is tremendous--you feel its pulse. [5 Aug 2013, p.48]
    • People Weekly
  10. Cove is exactly What it aspires to be--uncynical, lulling and sweet. [12 Aug 2013]
    • People Weekly
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    At this point the show may lack in si-prises, but like one of Miss Kay's lovingly prepared brisket dinners, there's pleasing comfort in its familiarity. [26 Aug 2013, p.37]
    • People Weekly
  11. [A] sure-footed legal drama. [2 Sep 2013]
    • People Weekly
  12. A lot of momentum is lost having the lovers live 60 miles apart.... But the tender wrap-up will leave the waterworks flushed and refreshed. [9 Sep 2013, p.42]
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  13. Even if his acting feels like a sentimental stunt, Gervais wrote and directed the series with gentle skill. [16 Sep 2013, p.41]
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  14. The opener sets this all up smoothly, and Collette, combining a mother's protective instinct with type A pride, is great to watch. [23 Sep 2013]
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  15. The first two episodes of season 3 are reassuringly grounded in believable intrigue. [7 Oct 2013, p.49]
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  16. Gina Gershon's performance as designer Donatella Versace is fabulously strange. [7 Oct 2013, p.49]
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  17. Gregg has a deadpan ease that makes the engine purr. And his team is good-looking and stamped with just enough personality and humor: Without killing the fun, they ground the show. [14 Oct 2013, p.43]
    • People Weekly
  18. [A] pleasurable, cheeky new crime drama. [21 Oct 2013, p.47]
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  19. This is all good, capering, costume-ball fun, even if Mary's life was dismal. My chief complaint is that pretty Adelaide Kane, as Mary, lacks any spirit or presence. [21 Oct 2013, p.50]
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  20. Burton and Taylor is a wry, bittersweet take on a celebrated Hollywood romance. [21 Oct 2013, p.48]
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  21. Williams's humming energy is charming (and more softly winsome than it used to be.) The challenge is to surround him with actors with enough skill to play off or with him. Gellar, as his daughter, doesn't quite pull it off. Hamish Linklater, as an art director, does. [4 Nov 2013]
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  22. If Faris is the little engine that could, Janney is the caboose along for the ride. [4 Nov 2013]
    • People Weekly
  23. The anecdotes slam into each other with a punch-drunk indifference--but director Spike Lee's style is a series of swift jabs. [18 Nov 2013, p.47]
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  24. Flawlessly done, but a tough sell. [2 Dec 2013, p.50]
    • People Weekly
  25. A slight, bright, British caper. [16 Dec 2013]
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  26. In the golden age of narrative TV, cartoons offer countervailing subversive pleasures: They're juvenile, satiric, surreal. Those words all apply to the wild spree Rick and Morty. [23 Dec 2013]
    • People Weekly
  27. This parody of bad vintage miniseries is asinine--it's supposed to be--and from time to time hilarious. [13 Jan 2014, p.49]
  28. Intelligence is nicely done. [20 Jan 2014]
    • People Weekly
  29. The first few episodes of Rake are, if anything, even fluffier than White Collar. All the better for Kinnear to gently cut through the whimsy with his sharp delivery. [27 Jan 2014, p.39]
    • People Weekly
  30. Flowers, both the book and the new movie, is completely absurd--if you want to gauge the absurdity, just know that one of the darkest secrets in the narrative involves a doughnut--but somehow also psychologically coherent. It has a grip.
  31. With its rugged leads displaying a light comic touch, the series has a fresh appeal. [3 Feb 2014, p.44]
    • People Weekly
  32. Growing Up Fisher is a winning, welcome example [of a family sitcom], conceptually novel and solidly cash. [24 Feb 2014, p.37]
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  33. The characters are too uneven a group: Some of them you instantly overlook, like the olive in a cocktail. Even so, thus has potential. [3 Mar 2014, p.41]
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  34. Crisis may not be great, but it works. [24 Mar 2014, p.35]
    • People Weekly
  35. This partly improvised comedy is closer to Girls than All About Eve: wistful yet stinging, silly yet wise about the instability of even the deepest friendships. [24 Mar 2014, p.37]
    • People Weekly
  36. The 100 is imaginative, surprising and fun--Lost for kids. [24 Mar 2014, p.39]
    • People Weekly
  37. Lindsay pulls us into her space and makes us feel protective. [31 Mar 2014]
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  38. If even a few good performances lock into your vision, you perk up. In this new comedy about friends in various stages of relationship envy and regret, there are two: James Van Der Beek and Zoe Lister-Jones. [7 Apr 2014, p.45]
    • People Weekly
  39. Bell is key, so plainly direct and unstudied that we see the past through his eyes. [14 Apr 2014, p.50]
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  40. The show is light with sharp baby kicks of meanness. [5 May 2014, p.46]
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  41. The show is vaguely mystical, implausible and sappy, but if you're in the right mood it's very moving. [5 May 2014, p.46]
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  42. Jack is back, and he's still a lot of fun. [12 May 2014]
    • People Weekly
  43. This version, set in Paris, compensates with an atmosphere of chic rot--they have that over there--an increased body count and an excellent cast. [19 May 2014, p.44]
  44. In the show's best moments, this moral pickle (being a mole vs. being a cop) leaves Ryan scrambling to improvise ways to prevent gang crimes without really catching anyone. [26 May 2014, p.40]
    • People Weekly
  45. Petals doesn't have the same smothering intensity but it's compellingly crazy, the TV equivalent of outsider art. [26 May 2014, p.42]
    • People Weekly
  46. His delivery, which falls between Monty Python and Austin Powers, explodes with enjoyable little pips of indignation. [26 May 2014, p.42]
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  47. The drawback to Catch Fire is that we aren't yet interested enough in the backup characters. For now Pace is reason enough to watch this on whatever TV, laptop or mobile screen you prefer in the digital age. [9 Jun 2014, p.33]
    • People Weekly
  48. It's painful to criticize a show that has intelligence and depth, but there's no getting around the fact that overarching earnestness and a subtle but troubling air of fatalism combine to make this a dolorous hour.
  49. Each episode tries to shoehorn in bold a history and an ethics lesson with the period dress and picturesque ports of call. The result, though visually rich, is like a fuddy-duddy theme-park ride.
  50. The show runs on the same alternating current of pathos and comedy as L.A. Law, but the drama is more ponderous and the humor a good deal more forced.
  51. This septet just has more highly evolved communication skills. They have a problem? They sit down and talk about it. BOR-ING!!! Or maybe the novelty has just worn off this experiment.
  52. A newsmagazine with a hip attitude is basically a good idea. A newsmagazine with a flip approach is not.
  53. The emergency sequences are pure adrenaline rush, but the drama, romance and humor ladled into the lull periods are pretty hackneyed.
  54. Fox... retains his wonderful timing and delivery. ... But the political satire that makes up the rest of the show is toothless, corny, passé.
  55. Spade... can deliver an insult with such grace and precision it's like watching Fred Astaire dance with a prop
  56. The two-hour premiere is sort of fun, but the plot is nutty even by sci-fi standards.
  57. Alternating—or rather, wavering—between frightening and funny, the show has yet to establish a clear identity beyond its-status as a post-teenage teammate of The WB's popular Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
  58. Though it seems a product of calculation more than inspiration, Roswell has appeal.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    A droll Petersen and dependable Marg Helgenberger head the competent cast, and the opener is offbeat enough to stimulate curiosity. But please don't overdo the camera tricks.
  59. Bravura performance, but Braugher needs support—stat!
  60. Entertaining, though short of super.
  61. As with all reality shows, the pleasure for viewers is the cruel one of rubbernecking a disaster.
  62. A lot of this material may be hackneyed, but Ritter puts it over with energy and a slathering of shtick. It's simple, really: Like him, like the show.
  63. But even if the clipped dialogue sometimes suggests cop-show parody, the well-constructed mysteries give Without a Trace a strong foundation.
  64. An entertaining big-narrative concept. [5 Sep 2005, p.41]
    • People Weekly
  65. The show could be compelling, especially if the cast pulls off two decades' worth of aging. [12 Sep 2005, p.46]
    • People Weekly
  66. Finnigan's performance dovetails perfectly with Close's neat if heavy- handed dramatic concept. [17 Oct 2005, p.39]
    • People Weekly
  67. The narrative seems unduly baggy and stretched out, nothing so sharply defined as a triangle. More like a rhomboid. [12 Dec 2005, p.39]
    • People Weekly
  68. The show has a sheen that's distinctive from Law [& Order]--young, exfoliated skin reflects light better from waxed court floors--and promises to be more fun than In Justice. [6 Mar 2006, p.41]
    • People Weekly
  69. This is all well done, and it's a great-looking production, but the weight of the drama keeps tugging toward a side plot about Braugher's 14-year-old stepdaughter. [10 Apr 2006, p.35]
    • People Weekly
  70. This new four-hour version... trims back the pageantry and tries for a degree of modern psychological realism. [17 Apr 2006, p.43]
    • People Weekly
  71. Scott's performance is totally believable, but that doesn't mean you want to ride shotgun with him in such a tired vehicle. [19 Jun 2006, p.37]
    • People Weekly
  72. The show isn't all that different from Bravo's recent Real Housewives of Orange County, although the production values are much higher--everything has an expensive, carefully lit feminine gloss that perfectly matches the homemakers. [19 Jun 2006, p.37]
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  73. [Viewers] may get a kick out of the mix of adrenaline and murk. [26 Jun 2006, p.41]
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  74. Path sometimes feels like 24 downsized into The Office. [18 Sep 2006, p.39]
    • People Weekly
  75. You go on the lam, and you find Laguna Beach. [2 Oct 2006, p.45]
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  76. It's pleasant enough--and thankfully it's not zany. The problem is that Danson's crisis is believable midlife comedy, while the patients' neuroses are closer to stock. [9 Oct 2006, p.41]
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  77. It feels so close to actual American life that it lacks the gut excitement that would take it over the line into true entertainment. [9 Oct 2006, p.41]
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  78. As in season 1, the acting is rich and lusty, with no costume-drama fustiness. [15 Jan 2007, p.33]
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  79. I wish the show had a little more verisimilitude--the peasants' homes look cheap, not poor--but it's zippy mindless fun. [5 Mar 2007, p.37]
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  80. Got to kick it up a notch, Chuck. [18 Jan 2010, p.41]
    • People Weekly
  81. This doesn't have as distinctive a style as The WB's Supernatural--that's more like a jeans ad for the undead--but Kolchak three decades on still knows how to move. [24 Oct 2005, p.41]
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  82. The show, despite good stunt work, is clunkily overfamiliar. [1 Feb 2010, p.37]
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  83. This family sitcom, adapted from Ice Cube's hit 2005 movie, is a modestly conceived, somewhat blandly executed story about a stepdad (Terry Crews from Everybody Hates Chris), his new wife (Essence Atkins) and her two kids. [7 Jun 2010, p.50]
    • People Weekly
  84. Fun enough, but the nastiness could be applied more heavily.
    • People Weekly
  85. The premiere feels sort of like "The Closer" but doesn't clinch the deal. I'm just not sure what to make of Jason Lee without his Jason Lee-ishness. But there's a crackle of eccentric touches, including an abundance of Elvis impersonators and the charmingly off-kilter Celia Weston as his mother.
    • People Weekly
  86. The inspiration can be heavy-handed, but how can you not feel for the couple?
    • People Weekly
  87. The end product should be called Hellkittens--not bad, but its tiny claws neither grip nor rip. [13 Sep 2010, p.47]
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  88. Skeet Ulrich and Corey Stoll are well-paired as detectives, and Alfred Molina, looking like an irascible owl, adds some harrumping power as deputy DA. [18 Sep 2010, p.40]
    • People Weekly
  89. The Most natural thing here is Palin's effortless command of the camera. In That Regard, the show is fascinating. [22 Nov 2010, p.38]
    • People Weekly
  90. What we have is a light, fast show about friends and couples who hang together, banter together and drink together. [8 Nov 2010, p.40]
    • People Weekly
  91. [Now in season 2]Courtney Cox's sitcom...is a light, fast show about friends and couples who hang together, banter together and drink together. [8 Nov 2010, p.40]
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  92. Season 2 of MTV's instant trash classic moves the Situation, Snooki and Co. down to Miami Beach for a little change of scenery and no apparent change in attitude. Actually, the scenery hasn't really changed, either.
    • People Weekly
  93. It's a light, clever performance. But Episodes never convinces us this is really Hollywood. [17 Jan 2011, p.40]
    • People Weekly
  94. Traffic Light is better than NBC's Perfect Couples--the jokes are more relaxed, and the cast includes NCIS's Liza Lapira, whose humor has bite. Not a killer ensemble, though. [14 Feb 2011, p.42]
    • People Weekly
  95. Piers Morgan's first nights filling Larry King's suspenders weren't great....He's better--thorough, thoughtful--with serious figures like Rudolph Giuliani. [14 Feb 2010, p.40]
    • People Weekly
  96. For now, Sunshine is a bit busy and unfocused. [28 Feb 2011, p.43]
    • People Weekly
  97. As Merlin, Joseph Fiennes is more like a trainer-dietitian than mentor, but he's lively. Eva Green, as Morgan, is coldly beautiful and magnificent in Camelot couture. She's enchanting. But I don't see Jamie Campbell Bower's Arthur having the resolve of a king. [28 Mar 2011, p.54]
    • People Weekly

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