Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

  • TV
For 713 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Breaking Bad: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 392
  2. Negative: 0 out of 392
392 tv reviews
  1. It's the too-bad-not-to-be-true stories Simon's telling about what the people of New Orleans were dealing with long after the waters receded that's kept my blood on simmer for the eight episodes I've seen so far.
  2. It's five nights of stimulating and ultimately disturbing television, and I'd like nothing better than to have more people to talk with about it.
  3. The Defenders, based on a documentary about a pair of hotshot Las Vegas lawyers, is easily the best thing to happen to Jim Belushi since "According to Jim" was canceled and people like me had to stop using him as a punchline....[And] They're not the only fun characters.
  4. I watched all of Season 1 and have seen eight episodes of Season 2, and beyond noticing that she's good at her job and not so good at her life, I still haven't figured out Jackie Peyton. Which is the way I like it.
  5. Years of Living Dangerously, produced by James Cameron, Jerry Weintraub and Arnold Schwarzenegger, does a good job in its premiere of widening the discussion of global warming.
  6. A drama on the order of "The Sopranos" or "The Shield," it's not about things--and people--getting better so much as it is about the struggle for survival. And like "Weeds," it's a show that might, if anything, have a little too much to say about the times in which we live.
  7. Enlisted is both very funny and very sweet.
  8. Between "Twilight," HBO's "True Blood" and the WB's upcoming "Vampire Diaries," I'd begun to feel overwhelmed by the undead. Then along came BBC America's Being Human to change my mind.
  9. If you can make the time in a season where most programmers think we're all too busy shopping to be watching anything heavier than "Miracle on 34th Street" (the Natalie Wood version, of course), then "Sleeper Cell" delivers.
  10. More than ever, though, it might be for those who loved "Lost" for the questions it asked, not those it answered.
  11. Billions isn't a subtle show. Its dialogue can be too on-the-nose, its insistence on contrasting the private lives of its warring alpha dogs too obvious.... What it is, is fun. Axelrod's a dashing hero, who may not be as heroic as he looks; Rhoades is a neurotic bulldog whose pursuit of Axe Capital may actually be in the public interest. Siff and Akerman's characters are as tough as, if not tougher than, the men in their lives.
  12. While the situations are far-fetched, the emotions are real. And Rodriguez, as a young control freak coming to terms with a situation she can't easily control, or dismiss, is terrific.
  13. Given the characters who also turn up looking to sell comics and memorabilia, Smith's original idea--"Pawn Stars" with comics--might have been enough to win him a slot just about anywhere on cable. The podcast just makes it funnier.
  14. Showing people having sex while wired up to machines may have gotten viewers in the door, but it's the characters and the performances that should keep them there.
  15. Holloway and Callies, no strangers to speculative, high-stakes drama, make a formidable pair as characters human enough to be relatable, skilled enough be potentially heroic.
  16. Baker's adorable, but it's Simmons, as the hilariously confident dad, who makes Henry's a childhood well worth exploring.
  17. I watched the five new episodes NBC sent and couldn't wait to see more.
  18. Alex's gender guarantees that her dynamic with the boss will be a bit different, and it's Glenister, whose Hunt continues to leave Harvey Keitel's in the dust, who's still the best reason to climb into this particular time machine.
  19. Better Off Ted may be a little too right for comfort about the work many of us do and the lives we live. But it's also funny.
  20. Along the way, Tom becomes briefly attached to potential ancestors who don't pan out or aren't quite what they first seem--a not unfamiliar experience is frequently rendered funny by just a small dollop of strangeness. Sometimes it's more than a dollop, but Family Tree doesn't dwell so long on any single absurdity to make anyone uncomfortable.
  21. I'll just say that the three-episode run of Zen, based on a series of mysteries by Michael Dibdin about a Venice-born, Rome-based cop named Aurelio Zen--you thought maybe he was a Buddhist?--was absorbing enough that I'm planning to check out the books next.
  22. This visually arresting thriller suggests that Gero is not easily pigeonholed.
  23. The writers of Bloodline apparently don't trust us in the deep water yet. But it's worth wading into, anyway.
  24. From its very first scene, Hereafter manages to capture the sense those of us being left behind sometimes get; that the person going already has a foot planted somewhere else. But it also, repeatedly, hones in on the joy that can hit unexpectedly at even the worst moments.
  25. In Showtime's seemingly unwatered-down version, William H. Macy plays the drunken dad, Frank Gallagher, convincingly enough that you can almost smell the alcohol (along with less-pleasant scents) seeping from every pore. (Other highlights include Joan Cusack as an agoraphobic homemaker whose life's about to change and Emmy Rossum as Fiona, the oldest of Frank's daughters.)
  26. I've seen all nine episodes of Luck's first season and I still don't know how to place a bet, much less pick a winner. But when the carousel finally stopped turning, I couldn't wait to buy another ticket.
  27. Forget the kids: I could happily watch Meloni and Harris banter and flirt for a half-hour a week.
  28. This unexpectedly charming, well-cast romantic comedy from Tad Quill ("Scrubs," "Spin City") represents something rare enough on NBC: a half-hour whose appeal might conceivably extend beyond the cable-sized viewership of savagely smart but more insular series like "30 Rock" and "Community."
  29. A strong supporting cast includes Margaret Avery as her sick and often fretful mother, Richard Roundtree as her father and Lisa Vidal as her producer and friend, Kara. But it's Union's commitment to all the craziness in her character's life (including sex in all the wrong places, with all the wrong people) that's likely to make Being Mary Jane my newest guilty pleasure.
  30. Things are lighter and brighter--and frequently funnier--in the Los Angeles of Life.

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