Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

  • TV
For 723 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Transparent: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 397
  2. Negative: 0 out of 397
397 tv reviews
  1. There are few issues in Chicagoland that won't seem drearily familiar to Philadelphians--or the residents of any large American city--but the show, narrated by former Chicago Sun-Times reporter Mark Konkol, is remarkably engaging.
  2. Downsizing to television not only doesn't hurt Steel Magnolias--it may have brought it into better focus.
  3. The show has fun with the "Captain America" mythology--cutting to a radio program in which Peggy hears herself portrayed as a damsel in frequent distress--yet is more accessible to newbies than "Marvel's Agents of SHIELD."
  4. Game of Thrones is a show worth watching based on a book worth reading.
  5. Huge is the latest addition to ABC Family's collection of shows targeted to tween and teen girls. Based on the two episodes I've seen so far, it's also one of the best, full of believable characters.
  6. Berlin's an enticing setting for Carrie, and Homeland, having gotten back its mojo after a too-long dalliance with Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis), seems once again headed in an interesting direction.
  7. Overall, Hope feels like a very new take on an old, old story.
  8. The show will skip hours here and there, but the "24" clock will continue to run, and if the first two hours are any indication, the time away has been good for the franchise.
  9. There's nothing generic about the funny (and charming) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.
  10. Chip is an angry guy wholly consumed with himself, but as ludicrous as he may be, Galifianakis makes him feel stubbornly real. Chip is a bitter, middle-age guy holding on to his dream so tightly he's suffocating himself. That commitment also extends to Louie Anderson, who brilliantly plays Chip's mom, Christine--yes, his mom (in drag).
  11. A sassy, slightly raunchy comedy about a serial dater who's told by a fortune teller that if she marries, it will be within a year--to a guy she's already met.
  12. Creator Tom Rob Smith's story may eventually seem far-fetched (or so I choose to hope), but Whishaw's performance as an emotional drifter who finds a focus only when it might be too late is too good to miss.
  13. She's a genuine character in her own right and The Middle worth checking out as the lead-in to the season's best new comedy, ABC's "Modern Family."
  14. Richard Dreyfuss' [portrayal of Bernie] makes no excuses for the con artist whose decades-long fraud cost his marks billions. It does humanize his family, which knew sadness even before Madoff's big reveal, and features a strong performance by Peter Scolari as Bernie's brother Peter.
  15. The Man in the High Castle has no trouble building and maintaining tension. Honestly, it gave me nightmares. Missing, or at least muted a bit in the four episodes I've seen, though, was the sense I had from the book of how life, and even personality, could be shaped by occupation over time, rendering resistance less and less likely.
  16. The pilot does a deft job of managing expectations for a world we're used to seeing splashed on a larger screen.
  17. Margulies, who appears to have buried Nurse Hathaway - and her scrubs--for good, is a crackling presence in the courtroom and just about everywhere else.
  18. It's vintage Larry - bad behavior that only gets worse as the half-hour goes on - and it begins to set the stage for the season's main event, the "Seinfeld" reunion that may or may not bring about another even more important one.
  19. Smartly adapted by Melissa Rosenberg, Jessica Jones doesn't require an advanced degree in comics history.
  20. A screwball comedy that's married Fey's responsible and subversive sides and harnessed the power of Alec Baldwin for funny, not fear.
  21. There's so much fun stuff going on in Supergirl, from cameos by Dean Cain ("Lois & Clark") and Helen Slater (1984's "Supergirl"), as Kara's adoptive parents, to the introduction of a sizzling hot James "Don't Call Me Jimmy" Olsen (Mehcad Brooks), that it seems churlish to complain about a subplot that threatens to spoil the fun by making a federal issue out of Supergirl.... Benoist's Kara is a joyful heroine and a tough one.
  22. This season, having already offered up Lindsay's perhaps too-facile explanation for what makes Dexter tick, the writers seem to be digging deeper into Butcher Boy's psyche, even as his colleagues find themselves digging deeper into his after-hours work. And as his pretend life becomes more challenging, it can't help but become more real.
  23. Cozy at times as any English village mystery, Smith's stories, like the snakes he often includes, have a way of striking when one least expects.
  24. Accents (and a few updates) aside, this is one exported L&O that plays as if it never left.
  25. Smartly updated.... the new show owes as much to "The Larry Sanders Show" as it does to "The Office" or "30 Rock."
  26. That it's still funny is probably a kind of miracle, the kind you just might not want to miss.
  27. Slightly harder-edged than "Amy," but just as estrogen-fueled, the best-timed show of the new season is a combination of the crime-centered procedurals CBS favors and a drama about the kind of family most of us have speculated about at one time or another.
  28. Love doesn't reach the comic heights of You're the Worst, but it does bring the funny, much of it supplied by Claudia O'Doherty (Trainwreck) as Mickey's put-upon Australian roommate.
  29. It's too soon to tell if The Event, the latest entry in the networks' race to find the next "Lost," isn't merely the next "FlashForward," since, by the end of an intriguing-enough pilot, you won't know much more than you did coming in (including whether NBC's willing to hang in there long enough for us to get some answers). But the cast is good.
  30. Zissis and Peet pluck the heartstrings as Alex and Tina do the dance of the modern rom-com, often with different partners, but it's Brett and Michelle whose struggles to connect make Togetherness a little too real to be funny.

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