Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

  • TV
For 618 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Murder One: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 331
  2. Negative: 0 out of 331
331 tv reviews
  1. It's quibbling to say that it feels at times as if Downton Abbey had been custom-designed for those of us for whom period romance is mother's milk, studded as it is with plucky heroines, accidental heirs and scheming dowagers, with just enough history thrown in to make the melodrama seem highbrow. It's not, really, though. It's simply delicious fun.
  2. What Code is is a show that's not afraid to be just a little bigger than life, if only to guarantee that after a long day in the real world, those of us who like our TV cops at least as interesting as our TV criminals will want to come along for the ride.
  3. Is Veda what happens when we shelter children from economic realities? Is she a bitch because her father left? Or simply a bad seed? That we never really find out didn't ruin Mildred Pierce for me. The story, after all, isn't called "Veda Pierce," and what remains is a surprising amount of fun, given that we're talking divorce, Depression and dysfunction.
  4. Writer-director Neil Jordan's first foray into series TV is everything you'd want in a premium-cable costume drama: lush, romantic, violent, tragic, funny--and far enough in the past that few of us are likely to argue.
  5. The best reason for tuning in to The Killing is that it might re-sensitize those who've seen one too many episodes of "Criminal Minds"--or overdosed on local news.
  6. Game of Thrones is a show worth watching based on a book worth reading.
  7. Why else would someone who grew up in the spotlight submit to an examination of his most private relationships and feelings if not to try to win strangers' hearts and minds?--but it's not nearly as interesting as the adjustments occurring to and around Chaz himself.
  8. I'll just say that the three-episode run of Zen, based on a series of mysteries by Michael Dibdin about a Venice-born, Rome-based cop named Aurelio Zen--you thought maybe he was a Buddhist?--was absorbing enough that I'm planning to check out the books next.
  9. A lot of the rest may feel like a rehash to women (and men) of a certain age, but for anyone not old enough to remember a time when network anchors, all male, felt free to make fun of the fledgling women's movement on the evening news, Gloria might yet have something to say.
  10. [There's] a level of ambiguity executive producers Howard Gordon and Alex Gansa might not have gotten away with when they were writing for Kiefer Sutherland's Jack Bauer on "24," but it's part of what makes Homeland, adapted from an Israeli series created by Gideon Raff, one of the season's most intriguing dramas.
  11. [A case] that's gradually revealed to be more and more horrific. The only thing that makes watching this story unfold even slightly bearable are West and Watson's performances.
  12. Lies is cynical enough to make "Up in the Air" look like "Once Upon a Time," but it's a stylish, sometimes witty cynicism.
  13. I've seen all nine episodes of Luck's first season and I still don't know how to place a bet, much less pick a winner. But when the carousel finally stopped turning, I couldn't wait to buy another ticket.
  14. Given the characters who also turn up looking to sell comics and memorabilia, Smith's original idea--"Pawn Stars" with comics--might have been enough to win him a slot just about anywhere on cable. The podcast just makes it funnier.
  15. I'd be happy enough with this cast and this concept to simply wander along for a bit, ignoring the trail of bread crumbs and focusing on the lengths one man might go to hold onto those he loves.
  16. This unexpectedly charming, well-cast romantic comedy from Tad Quill ("Scrubs," "Spin City") represents something rare enough on NBC: a half-hour whose appeal might conceivably extend beyond the cable-sized viewership of savagely smart but more insular series like "30 Rock" and "Community."
  17. Executive producers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss have so far done a remarkable job adapting a story with even more moving parts than the show's very cool title sequence.
  18. Don't Trust the B---- in Apartment 23 is one of the funnier network shows of the season.
  19. [Dunham has] crafted an honest and at least occasionally hilarious show that might even live up to its hype.
  20. Though the show takes the dancers' work at least as seriously as it takes their relationships, you won't need to know a pliƩ from a pirouette to appreciate the drama, and yes, the touch of class, in Breaking Pointe.
  21. It has more heart than I first credited it with, and the season-long arc involving Sean and Beverly is both funny and touching.
  22. [Go On] is among the best new comedies of the season.
  23. The Closer may be moving on, but she's left the franchise in good hands.
  24. It's the too-bad-not-to-be-true stories Simon's telling about what the people of New Orleans were dealing with long after the waters receded that's kept my blood on simmer for the eight episodes I've seen so far.
  25. So far, Kaling's is pitch-perfect.
  26. plenty of other characters worth getting to know in a show whose pilot holds up under repeat viewing and whose second episode doesn't disappoint.
  27. Downsizing to television not only doesn't hurt Steel Magnolias--it may have brought it into better focus.
  28. If you've loved every minute of Downton Abbey up to now, you'll likely still love it this season.
  29. Bacon, always a watchable actor, is the perfect, and necessary, counterbalance to Purefoy.
  30. The real fascination of The Americans can be found not in the lies Philip and Elizabeth tell the world, but in those they tell themselves.

Top Trailers