Philadelphia Daily News' Scores

For 755 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Game of Thrones: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Big Shots: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 418
  2. Negative: 0 out of 418
418 tv reviews
  1. It's at its best--if not necessarily its funniest--when Em and Doll are struggling to find a balance between their childhood selves and the more demanding adults they've become.
  2. Ball's done an entertaining job of turning Harris' stories about life in a small Southern town after vampires "come out of the coffin" into something adults who wouldn't dream of reading her books might be caught dead watching.
  3. Lies is cynical enough to make "Up in the Air" look like "Once Upon a Time," but it's a stylish, sometimes witty cynicism.
  4. Golden Boy works as a decent cop show. But an epic one? Not yet.
  5. Yes, it's a CW series, but one that poses enough lifeboat-ethics issues to keep a freshman philosophy class busy for months.
  6. I found the first episode of "Survivors" incredibly depressing and began to think longingly of rewards challenges and hidden immunity idols. But a subsequent episode, though devoid of tribal councils, did provide enough heart and even occasional flashes of humor to make survival - and the continuation of "Survivors" - seem like a fate considerably better than death.
  7. [Casey Wilson and Ken] Marino have established a nice chemistry by the end of the pilot, which gives me hope for a show whose premise appeared limiting.
  8. An entertaining romp with strong performances, it seems a good fit for Lifetime.
  9. I wouldn't recommend taking every word of "The Tudors" as fact, much less citing it in a term paper, but as historical fiction, it's proven remarkably robust.
  10. McGinley is delightfully obnoxious, and the young lovers are quite sweet, but it's the undercurrent of resentment flowing in two directions that raises Ground Floor, if not to TV comedy's penthouse, at least to its second floor.
  11. Crisis takes kids in jeopardy, class conflict and adolescent (and national) insecurity and stirs them into a surprisingly effective thriller.
  12. New Amsterdam's pilot, directed by Lasse Hallstrom, who's also one of the show's executive producers, is as well-executed as any I've seen this season.
  13. Like Durant's ideal route, the five episodes I've seen of Hell on Wheels tend to meander a bit.
  14. The formula may be hokey, but Traffic Light's execution of it is charming, and funny in a way that doesn't seem to be trying too hard, thanks to some happy casting and scripts that appear to have been written with real people in mind.
  15. I don't mind seeing actors like Ed Burns, Milo Ventimiglia and Robert Knepper in nice suits, acting the way bad guys in old movies are supposed to act. I'm even happier to see Jon Bernthal all cleaned up and zombie-free. I just can't quite tell, after two episodes, whether their stories can compete with their setting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    NBC's Smash returns for its second season Tuesday still a work in progress. But at least there is progress.
  16. [Larry Hagman's eyebrows] are the most contemporary thing about the "new" Dallas, which otherwise looks and feels like a chunk of the '80s trapped in amber.
  17. Passmore's interesting to watch, but the characters are frustrating in their refusal to acknowledge that their obstacles are far from insurmountable.
  18. Now it's a talky but straight-ahead ensemble cop show whose cast includes Michael Imperioli ("The Sopranos") and James McDaniel ("NYPD Blue"). Think "Southland" in Detroit.
  19. The comedy's broad, the characters broader--Chris Parnell plays a control freak of a vice principal, Brooke Burns the former homecoming queen from Becky's year who's just joined the faculty--but there are moments when you can see it turning into something watchable.
  20. I managed to gallop through the nine increasingly addictive episodes CBS provided for review.
  21. Mos Def, Colin Hanks and Edward James Olmos play characters with a religious bent in a season that doesn't yet feel as compelling as the one dominated by John Lithgow but allows Dexter to remain the way his fans most want him--alive and killing.
  22. Grandfathered" is Stamos at his handsome-but-vulnerable best. Its pilot, a snappy half-hour sprinkled with celebrity cameos and one-liners, isn't groundbreaking television, but it sets the table for a multigenerational rom-com.
  23. I'm not hooked, but I'm not yet planning my escape, either.
  24. Mike & Molly, a romantic comedy about two people (Billy Gardell and Melissa McCarthy) who meet at Overeaters Anonymous, is, like most Lorre shows, a conventional-looking sitcom that manages to be very funny in a format that's been around for more than 50 years.
  25. Smartly updated.... the new show owes as much to "The Larry Sanders Show" as it does to "The Office" or "30 Rock."
  26. "Six Feet Under's" Rainn Wilson, in fact, is so weirdly compelling as Scott's hierarchy-obsessed assistant that he just might make the whole exercise worthwhile. [24 Mar 2005, p.36]
    • Philadelphia Daily News
  27. [A] funny and charming new docu-series.
  28. Given that the show largely consists of the animated Gervais and Merchant sitting around a table with the notoriously round-headed Pilkington, disabusing him of one oddball notion after another, it's strange that Gervais would've chosen this show to carry his name. But true believers--or fans of "The Life & Times of Tim," whose second-season premiere follows at 9:30--may well have a yabba-dabba-do time.
  29. I gradually lost interest during the agents' first case together, which takes them on the road. Here's hoping the assignments get better. Because the warehouse itself is packed to the rafters with (sorry, Syfy) geeky fun.
  30. In four subsequent episodes I've seen, the stories and characters get to breathe a bit. [MacDowell's] Olivia's just headstrong enough to stay interesting.
  31. I've only seen one episode, which is enough to feel hopeful about the chemistry between Karl Urban (playing an angry, damaged human cop) and Michael Ealy (his possibly misprogrammed android partner) but not quite enough to tell why Lili Taylor would sign on to play the captain in a sci-fi buddy-cop show.
  32. I'm not entirely sure where Tolan, Kinnear and company are going with this, but I'm only interested if they're willing to go all in. Because a toothless rake is of no use at all.
  33. No one should base a term paper on it, but Da Vinci's Demons is at least an entertaining lie.
  34. Meant to provoke, it's about as subtle as a slap.... It's also a "Saturday Night Live" parody waiting to happen.
  35. As USA dramas go, Necessary Roughness is about halfway between "In Plain Sight" and "White Collar" on the believability scale, but it's summer and I like Thorne, whose character is feisty and funny and shrill only when shrillness is absolutely justified.
  36. Yes, it sounds insane (you can't have ghosts on CBS who don't help solve crimes) and like many of this season's pilots, it left me wondering how the show's premise could be sustained for more than a few episodes, much less multiple seasons. But it's an awfully pretty pilot.
  37. Bacon, always a watchable actor, is the perfect, and necessary, counterbalance to Purefoy.
  38. As the one character who grounds a story that would otherwise seem like a random collection of bad things happening to so-so people, Britton's the only reason I could imagine watching American Horror Story past the three episodes I've seen.
  39. Herrera, Davis, and Ruck are all good enough to make me want to see more, but there have been so many decades of demons since the original movie made heads spin, that the evil--or at least its special-effects-assisted manifestation--feels a little tired.
  40. The acting is good, and Snowfall does these transformations well, but it’s not what supposedly sets it apart. If we’re not going to see more of the before picture--and of the people, like Franklin’s mother, Cissy (Michael Hyatt, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend), who are doing their best to keep things together--then what is Snowfall waiting for? Snow, already.
  41. I can't disagree with those who insist the show passed its sell-by date a few years back, but it doesn't mean I'm not still fond enough of these guys to keep watching.
  42. What's sad about Sherri--other than the fact that her ex, Kevin, is played by Malcolm-Jamal Warner, who was brought up better than this by Cliff and Clair Huxtable--is that while it's supposedly a show about a woman moving on after a divorce, it's being made by a woman who so clearly hasn't.
  43. I'm more bothered by the dialogue, which doesn't always ring true. Sunny California or not, there's nothing in the first three episodes to approach the sheer joy of Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey in a car together.
  44. A sassy, slightly raunchy comedy about a serial dater who's told by a fortune teller that if she marries, it will be within a year--to a guy she's already met.
  45. Eli/Ally not only isn't the most original character of the season, he's not the most sharply defined, either.
  46. There are few issues in Chicagoland that won't seem drearily familiar to Philadelphians--or the residents of any large American city--but the show, narrated by former Chicago Sun-Times reporter Mark Konkol, is remarkably engaging.
  47. I generally don't place myself in that crowd [viewers who think there's nothing funnier than an overweight guy with a jock-strap tan line], being more "Elf" than "Old School," but McBride's Powers exudes a Mitch Williams-meets-John Kruk vibe that's hard to resist, and, hey, I laughed more than once.
  48. It may demand more patience than it's worth.
  49. Hawley, who cited two of the best cop shows ever, "Hill Street Blues" and "NYPD Blue," as models, might want to hold off on the patent application. The one episode I've seen of The Unusuals felt unreal and unoriginal. Too bad, because Hawley's assembled some terrific players to populate his precinct of supposed misfits.
  50. This one tries so hard to set up its premise that at times it ends up feeling more like a PSA than a comedy, which can be annoying if you're already on board with same-sex marriage and gay parenting.
  51. It's a subject that was explored more deeply, and even a touch more believably, in BBC America's "Jekyll," a nail-biter of an update in which James Nesbitt inhabited both personalities so completely they barely even looked alike. Slater, by contrast, just seems like a guy in need of a good night's sleep.
  52. Unnecessary, and close to unwatchable, is ABC's The Goode Family, a long-delayed animated entry from "King of the Hill" producer Mike Judge.
  53. There's nothing cutting-edge about Cristela, and there doesn't need to be.
  54. The humor's as broad as Lake Michigan, but when Sirens wades in a little deeper, as it occasionally does, it sometimes manages to be even funnier.
  55. Maybe [it's] no worse than what MTV's done with "Teen Mom" and "Jersey Shore." But it's no better, either.
  56. I just wish that its 90-minute premiere was a tad more entertaining, because I found a lot to like in two subsequent episodes.
  57. Richard Dreyfuss' [portrayal of Bernie] makes no excuses for the con artist whose decades-long fraud cost his marks billions. It does humanize his family, which knew sadness even before Madoff's big reveal, and features a strong performance by Peter Scolari as Bernie's brother Peter.
  58. Together [Whitford and Hanks], well, they're just silly and in a way that made me feel a lot happier than anything on "24" has made me feel in a long, long time
  59. I've only seen two episodes and while I'm not yet ready to move in with the Bravermans, I'm at least curious to see what they're doing next.
  60. Royal Pains, with a sunny star and even sunnier setting, might be just what the doctor ordered for those who can't take one more minute of pseudo-celebrity antics.
  61. The rushed plot leaves Grossman's rich world feeling empty. That world is still fun to live in--even if it's not as good in TV form.
  62. The cast is solid--including Adam Baldwin as Chandler's No. 2--and if we must contemplate annihilation-by-virus, there are certainly less-pretty places to view it than from the deck of The Last Ship.
  63. This one's helped considerably by the casting of Gillies--whose character, it turns out, actually can sing--and Corbett, who's as smooth as Leary is rough.
  64. This is Mad Love, which takes a good cast--however tired I am of Labine playing the same guy--and forces them to try to make themselves heard over people who seem to think everything they say is hilarious.
  65. The World According to Dick Cheney has some chilling moments, from his dispassionate description of waterboarding ("It creates a sensation of drowning") to his 9/11 narrative, in which he takes responsibility for having authorized the shooting down of Flight 93 if it approached Washington. What it doesn't have is a lot of navel-gazing.
  66. As good as the performances are and as fascinating it might be to see the inner workings of a celebrity trial where money was apparently no object, Phil Spector plays like a docudrama.
  67. If you watch "Shark," it's going to be for those Woods-ian rants and for the sheer exuberance he brings to them.
  68. Teddy's impulses are undeniably good ones, but tales of African corruption are nothing new and often cited as a cause of viewer fatigue. And though Teddy's expected to range far and wide, it remains to be seen whether The Philanthropist, and its debonair title character, have anything new to do--or say--about the problems he'll encounter.
  69. As much fun as it might be for some of us to start our Wednesday nights watching a shirtless Taye Diggs get out of bed - just as it was once fun to watch Agents Mulder and Scully chase goblins and ghosties and things that go bump in the night - these TV conspiracies have a way of ending badly.
  70. It's a solid effort, but after three episodes, I'm not convinced that puncturing a carefully crafted image brings us closer to knowing the actual women behind the men.
  71. I liked the original and also like what little I've seen of the remake so far, but won't know until it expands beyond the original stories - as American series generally must do - whether it's worth sticking with.
  72. If not for Epps--and Fisher and Smith, who are terrific as two people trying to come to terms with the impossible--I might have preferred this one had stayed buried.
  73. Peter Facinelli (plays a former U.S. attorney and Jake Robinson an activist who are also getting dangerously close to the secret that threatens Sgt. Ballard, though it's Friel and Omar Ghazaoui, the young Moroccan playing her traveling companion, who are most responsible for making American Odyssey stand out from the conspiracy crowd.
  74. It's an intriguing idea (more intriguing, anyway, than having Beals cracking chests and mouthing off at people for an hour a week), but honestly, the case-of-the-week execution on Proof doesn't add up to a lot, medically or metaphysically.
  75. Samantha Who? could easily be a complete mess. That it isn't is almost entirely due to Applegate, who brings sweetness, sarcasm and a steely edge to this story of a woman doing everything she can not to become the person she's always been.
  76. It's Shahi, whose Kate may be grumpy but who somehow gets to smile more in one episode than she might have in an entire season of "Life," who lights up the screen and makes Legal a keeper.
  77. The show's real power resides in Lowe herself, whose screen presence makes even the silliest bits of Wonderland work better than they probably deserve to.
  78. I loved every minute of tonight's two-hour premiere of Fox's new horror-comedy, Scream Queens, except for the ones Jamie Lee Curtis wasn't in.... This is a show that's gathered an impressive lineup of young names, including Emma Roberts as the ultimate mean girl, Abigail Breslin ("Little Miss Sunshine"), Keke Palmer ("Akeelah and the Bee"), Billie Lourd (a newbie who'll also be in the new "Star Wars" movie with mom Carrie Fisher) and, of course, Michele, and then cast them as cliches.
  79. Fans of USA's White Collar might enjoy the cat-and-mouse game that ensues, though I'd argue that the relationship between its con artist, Neal Caffrey (Matt Bomer), and FBI agent Peter Burke (Tim DeKay) was (in a totally bro way) a more compelling romance than this one.... Krause, who looks the way he always does, even when his character's trying to look different, isn't all that convincing a con man, but maybe that's exactly what's required of a con man.
  80. It's not entirely Liotta's fault, though, that there's so little passion in "Smith," that the Everyman situations that serve "The Sopranos" so well seem so, well, generic, here and that the intricacies of the gang's capers fail to fascinate.
  81. As the series goes on and takes a deeper interest in the multitude of characters he's gathered around him, Mr. Selfridge begins to come into focus. Whether you'll find it as engaging as "Downton Abbey" may depend less on any single performance than on how invested you can become in the rise of the modern perfume counter and off-the-rack dresses.
  82. And though there are a few clunkers along the way... the largely theater-trained cast is as solid as the writing, which only grows stronger in two subsequent episodes.
  83. There are one or two (or five) plot points too many packed into each episode, potentially lessening the impact of any single one but also ensuring that Life won't be one long sobfest.
  84. While there's nothing groundbreaking happening in "My Boys," there is something a bit fresher than we saw in any of the many "Sex and the City" wannabes that popped up a few seasons ago.
  85. Like "Entourage," whose laughs often are found in its secondary characters, "How to Make It in America" boasts some irresistible ones, including ....Martha Plimpton as Edie, the very funny interior-designer boss of Ben's ex-girlfriend Rachel (Lake Bell). Indeed, Plimpton has a speech in Episode 3 that kind of made me wish the whole series was about her. Instead of, well, about two twentysomething guys who so far seem unlikely to make it anywhere, including HBO.
  86. I'll admit that between the CW and ABC Family, I'm having trouble keeping track of the duos who've been separated at birth, switched at birth, given up at birth and in the case of Ringer, apparently just found themselves drifting apart into different worlds, but by halfway through tonight's pilot, I felt as if I'd seen this one before.
  87. Where American Gypsies shines--and it really does shine here and there--is in the glimpses we get of the internal system of justice that's developed among a people who don't trust government, and family rituals like the "red-dress ceremony" with which the Johns family welcomes its newest member.
  88. Cassidys aside, the Ruby pilot, at least, feels more Disney Channel than ABC Family, with a sitcommy pace that doesn't allow for much in the way of plot or character development.
  89. Aquarius touches, not very subtly, on issues of race, gender and sexual preference while pursuing a story involving Manson that's complicated but not actually as compelling as some of the lesser subplots.
  90. Stephen Merchant plays a socially awkward British web designer living in Los Angeles who's not good with women, but in ways so obvious (and obnoxious) that it's hard to commiserate with him, much less laugh.
  91. As an eccentric genius, Williams is in familiar waters, and he's found a playmate in James Wolk, who's somehow able to keep up with an actor whose streams of consciousness can be Class V rapids. Gellar's playing it straight, but a scene in which she has to sing in front of Kelly Clarkson suggests she's game for anything.
  92. I've seen just enough of "NCIS" to appreciate its appeal, which I suspect lies in casting and character development (combined, of course, with occasional explosions of action). Those elements appear to be part of the DNA for NCIS: Los Angeles.
  93. Sutherland's very moving as a father fighting to hold on to a son who was slipping away from him even before the authorities came calling, but the show still feels at times like a mashup of "24" and "Touched by an Angel."
  94. The cops, led by Marc Lavoine, are an interesting mix, and the scenery's great. If only the crime itself didn't seem so drearily familiar.
  95. Based on the few, non-consecutive episodes I've seen, it does seem willing, though, to pose some hard questions, including whether it's reasonable to expect that the people we pay to lie down with dogs won't ever wake up with fleas. Or worse.
  96. Bower's not the most compelling hero--and Fiennes can be a bore--but the story, however twisted, remains amusing.
  97. The CW series that takes "Sex and the City" fashionista and sexual anthropologist Carrie Bradshaw all the way back to 1984 Connecticut, and high school, the fit's a little off.
  98. Poehler's funny because she's a smart blonde, not a dumb one. Here, she's reduced to one of TV's default settings.
  99. Narrated by Charlie (Griffin Gluck), a 12-year-old in a coma (yes, it's very "If I Stay"), Red Band boasts a telegenic young cast that otherwise spends little time lying down.

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