Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,403 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Everlasting Moments
Lowest review score: 0 Surviving Christmas
Score distribution:
3,403 movie reviews
  1. You want to cut Cop Out some slack because it's just so darn eager to please. So let's grant that it will make a reliably fun companion when it's on cable 10 times a week.
  2. Wait till the DVD release.
  3. Brosnan, who finds the truth in his character, is quite affecting. And Mulligan, gamely defining a surprisingly undefined young woman, is like a sunbeam piercing the gloom.
  4. An overobvious and underwhelming satire about American consumerism run amok.
  5. The script is boilerplate, the wit pretty much witless.
  6. Cutesy and formulaic and has the approximate depth of a cookie sheet.
  7. How bad is Prince of Persia? Whether or not director Mike Newell is to blame, the action sequences lack verve and scope.
  8. Feels like the cinematic equivalent of the BP disaster in the gulf: It's a big-screen oil spill, a needless gushing of macho bluster and wild set pieces, and a waste of millions and millions of dollars.
  9. Kilcher is lovely. But sadly, Ka'iulani is a perfunctory biopic of the sort one might encounter on television during Women's History Month.
  10. Tonally, the film from director Anurag Basu has more personalities than Sybil. Basu strictly observes the B-movie convention of giving the audience an embrace, explosion, or chase sequence at regular intervals. If you don't like the genre, wait three minutes.
  11. The film drifts along on a stream of humiliation jokes - physical, emotional, sexual, hairpiece-ial.
  12. As doggy movies go, this one gets two paws out of four.
  13. Unfortunately, this all proceeds at a supersonic tempo, with Shyamalan's directorial finger stuck on the fast-forward button. Significant plot points whiz by in this movie equivalent of speed-dating.
  14. A preposterous, if admittedly fun, exercise in sci-fi/horror mayhem.
  15. On the whole, the movie is more Cheez Whiz than wizardly.
  16. The cast is full of fresh-faced unknowns ready for their close-ups. Most likely to succeed is Kayla Jackson, an almond-eyed dreamer, as Brittany, anchor of the Ovations and of her family.
  17. Her (Angela Ismailos) generic questions about the politics, economics, and aesthetics of film yield predictably generic responses from her subjects.
  18. There's a fine line between stupid comedy that's actually pretty smart and stupid comedy that's just dumb, and The Other Guys crosses the line - into realms of unredeeming dunderheadedness - more often than it should.
  19. Aimed at teens and tweens, the almost-squeaky-clean Step Up 3-D shamelessly piles on the corn, stacking it so high that it's bound to tilt over and collapse.
  20. The trailers already have given away the "surprise" cameos in The Expendables, so try not to blink when Stallone goes into a church (shades of John Woo) to meet his mystery boss, played by a bald-pated, trademark smirking Bruce Willis.
  21. The film whipsaws between hyperbolic character study and preachy account of the recent financial meltdown. The two story lines are not well-integrated.
  22. With pratfalls and teardrops, the film swings from sitcom to sit-dram.
  23. Flat and predictable.
  24. An alarmingly charmless attempt to evoke the elegant romance and jaunty, jet-setting intrigue of the aforementioned titles, The Tourist is notable for the total absence of movie-star heat that movie stars are paid unseemly sums to radiate.
  25. Tillman, who made a splash last year with his hip-hop hit "Notorious," does a nice job of calling into question the assumption, shared by most genre films, that vengeance is the only right course of action.
  26. Legacy is a two-hour light show with a lot of flash, a little style, and not one byte of narrative originality.
  27. The million-dollar cast doesn't make the vulgar penny-ante jokes any funnier.
  28. Tonally, Casino Jack is all over the place: exaggerated comedy, cartoonish high jinks, then heavy-handed melodrama (a third-act face-off between Abramoff and his wife, played with no center of gravity by Kelly Preston, comes out of nowhere).
  29. It'd be nice if Jason Statham and Ben Foster, The Mechanic's mentor/protege duo, could crack a smile. Once.
  30. Sandler, shambling and smirky, delivers another of those one-take performances of his - likable and lazy, forever on the verge of cracking himself up.

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