Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,289 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Before the Devil Knows You're Dead
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
3,289 movie reviews
  1. In the end, what the movie is about: time and life, and what we do with them, and what we regret that we didn't do.
  2. An unnerving and astonishing thriller.
  3. So jaw-droppingly out there, so bracingly bizarre, and, much of the time, so fall-over-funny that even its flaws don't matter. Easily the oddest movie of the year, it is also one of the best.
  4. It's “The Wizard of Oz” with a viral infection.
  5. It's a testament to Cage's canny performance and Jonze's seamless use of special effects that you believe Charlie and Donald are two entirely different people.
  6. With its mix of Lewis Carroll and William Gibson; Japanese anime and Chinese chopsocky; mythological allusions, and machine-made illusion, offers a couple of hours of escapist fun.
  7. Bielinsky's movie builds like a poker game in which the players, having invested everything, cannot afford to fold.
  8. Pure, undiluted joy.
  9. A love song to the new Europe (Klapisch's original title: Euro Pudding) and a snapshot of a polyglot gang on the cusp of kind-of-reckless youth and responsibility-burdened adulthood.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A heady stew of psychological disorders and classic tragedies, borrowing from Shakespeare, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and the Greeks.
  10. There's a loneliness at the heart of this world, and Ghost World, that's really touching -- and a bit scary, too.
  11. A feverish melodrama about an idealist who, in following his heart and his bishop's orders, leads himself into temptation and his parish into hypocrisy.
  12. Terrifically satisfying film.
  13. The rhythms of Whale Rider are hypnotic as the ebb tide, haunting as the song of the humpback sea mammal, bracing as the ocean spray. It's a movie that rewards the patient viewer.
  14. Has a dreamy ominousness about it, and a sorrowfulness that speaks to the artificial intimacies of cellular communication, digital images and dial-up porn.
  15. Assembles varied and remarkable digital video, archival footage, photographs, interviews and personal reflections and academics' perspectives to convey the scope and history of the Tibetan story.
  16. It's the old cliche, but (like most cliches) it's true: It's impossible to imagine this picture without this actor.
  17. So incrementally does Eastwood's film build toward what seems like an inevitable resolution that when it concludes, you're sucker-punched. You haven't been watching a police procedural, but a Greek tragedy. You haven't been watching a drama about the catharsis of vigilantism, but sitting vigil for a community diminished, and permanently damaged, by violence.
  18. An intimate epic of infinite grace.
  19. Where Denys Arcand's delightful 1986 comedy "The Decline of the American Empire" celebrated the good life, his profoundly funny sequel The Barbarian Invasions heartily toasts the good death.
  20. Wondrously emotional film, one that sneakily dismantles your defenses and purges grief you didn't realize you had.
  21. The Cooler is small-scale moviemaking about small-scale lives. But it's big in all the right ways.
  22. Tender but never sappy, Monsieur Ibrahim brings two people of vastly different age and background together in ways that are touching, and telling. It's a small, glowing gem.
  23. McNamara, a robust conversationalist, is so lively that he bursts out of what is essentially a talking-head documentary.
  24. Plays with cultural stereotypes, and upends them as well. The picture starts as one thing and turns, dramatically, movingly, into something else.
  25. It's a feminist nightmare, the world brought to life -- in hard-hitting documentary style.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Touching the Void is, indeed, about living, but not the exhilarating kind. It's about survival -- raw, real, by force of will.
  26. Proves that the most local story is sometimes the most universal, the simplest tale sometimes the most complex.
  27. It is the more satisfying of the two installments - less over-the-top, arterial-gushing violence and more investigation into character, motives, back-story.
  28. It's the stuff of soap opera, infused with a nonchalant, David Lynch-like surrealism and a nutball Canadian humor. Beer - because of the baroness, and because this is Canada - flows freely.

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