Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,286 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 35 Shots of Rum
Lowest review score: 0 Surviving Christmas
Score distribution:
3,286 movie reviews
  1. If Malik doesn't remind you of Al Pacino's Michael Corleone on his journey from innocence to corruption in "The Godfather" saga, well . . . he should. A Prophet is similarly, startlingly momentous.
  2. Offers a view of war that is anything but epic. Instead of sweeping battles and swooping fighter planes, in Lebanon we are brought into the impossibly claustrophobic world of a lone tank crew.
  3. Most of all, it is the improbably entertaining story of how new media are altering the very nature of courtship and friendship.
  4. A profoundly unnerving historical document.
  5. Wild and woolly, the movie is a breathtaking head trip that hails from a long tradition of backstage melodramas: "42nd Street," "A Star Is Born," "All About Eve," and, yes, that kitschy '90s relic, "Showgirls."
  6. While White Material is very much the story of this one woman, it is also a story of postcolonial Africa, a place where Europeans staked their claim, and where disorder and destruction upended everything. A mournful, frightening, powerful film.
  7. Under Hooper's deft direction, it packs the suspense of a thriller.
  8. Gorgeous, and full of bittersweet whimsy.
  9. Yun's performance is remarkable. The journey Mija takes is painful and hard and - for us, watching - sublime.
  10. It's an observation of crushing truth.
  11. A beautiful, head-spinning mystery that requires keen attention - and rewards it with a tricky and poetic payoff - The Double Hour is a topflight Euro thriller right up there with "Tell No One."
  12. 13 Assassins is, at turns, thrilling and funny, visually exquisite and emotionally charged.
  13. Still, somehow, The Tree of Life - impressionistic, revelatory, elliptical - works.
  14. It's a relentless and relentlessly funny game of one-upmanship as the two men, playing somewhat exaggerated versions of themselves, roam the hills and dales, posh inns and poetic ruins of England's Lake District.
  15. Funny, furious, and full of front-office drama.
  16. This taut cautionary tale explores the dark side of American politics. And leaves the viewer to wonder - if anyone's still wondering - is there a bright side?
  17. Take Shelter, which, it should be said, boasts haunting but seamless visual effects, is a movie for this moment in time, this moment in our lives.
  18. Moves from its protagonist's dream state to her memories to her waking present in imperceptible shifts - the effect is disorienting, at first, but ingenious.
  19. Clooney has never been better, subtler, more deeply rooted in a performance than he is in The Descendants. And he's funny, too.
  20. Strangely, wonderfully, The Artist feels as bold and innovative a moviegoing experience as James Cameron's bells-and-whistles Avatar did a couple of years ago. Retro becomes nuevo. Quaint becomes cool.
  21. The real 3-D experience of the season is Pina, Wim Wenders' shockingly beautiful and moving tribute to the late German choreographer Pina Bausch.
  22. As lovingly written as it is beautifully rendered.
  23. The usual complaints and caveats about Anderson - he's precious, his characters have no grounding in the real world - can be made about Moonrise Kingdom, but so what? This is his seventh feature, he has been working with a gang of collaborators in front of the camera and behind, and his worldview gets richer, and more revealing, even as the view from his lens gets smaller, closer, almost two-dimensional in its oddball tableaux.
  24. Beasts of the Southern Wild transports us to places that are peculiar and dangerous and magical, and makes us feel weirdly at home.
  25. Gripping, hair-raising documentary.
  26. It is, without doubt, a transcendent endeavor, from its exhilaratingly smart screenplay - director David O. Russell's adaptation of the novel by former South Jersey teacher Matthew Quick - to the unexpected and moving turns of its two leads.
  27. The narrative at the heart of Rust and Bone is a vehicle for sentiment and over-the-top histrionics if ever there was one, but Audiard and his two stars deliver the exact opposite: a film thrillingly raw and essential, life-affirming, sublime.
  28. A monumental achievement that documents a coordinated and complicated response to a monumental tragedy.
  29. Amour arrives with plaudits and praise. But this is not hype, it is all deserved. This is a masterpiece.
  30. If vigilance and preemption, recompense and retaliation is not enough, the film asks, then what is?

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