Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,912 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 The Descendants
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
3912 movie reviews
  1. A thinker and an educator, Zinn has led a life of commitment and compassion, and the film offers a loving tribute.
  2. It's great to hear a director talking candidly about the actors he's worked with, dishing out good, juicy stuff.
  3. What begins as Lafcadia's journey into the heart of darkness ends as his pilgrimage into the light. Stunning.
  4. Does what the best movies can do: take viewers to what might be unfamiliar places, into a culture with unique customs and traditions, and show, through drama and comedy, how the fundamental truths of the human experience need no translation.
  5. Crash fools around with chronology in a Tarantinoesque way that brings its story full circle. You could argue that as events, and people, merge, Haggis' spiky screenplay (cowritten with Bobby Moresco) gets to be, quite simply, too much.
  6. The filmmakers don't bother hammering home a backstory or explaining why David is crazy. They just throw us in the deep end and dazzle us with a series of violent encounters that ends with a deadly chase in a surreal fun house maze of mirrors.
  7. Mongol is great cinema, great fun.
  8. French movies are not so neatly resolved. In fact, the point of many French movies, such as this provocative one from director Laurent Cantet, is that some problems don't have satisfying solutions - or resolutions.
  9. Must-see stuff.
  10. Offers a sometimes lyrical, sometimes gut-turning portrait of war seen through the eyes of children.
  11. This beautiful, unfolding film is an antidote to the high-velocity, maximum-volume world most of us find ourselves immersed in, offering a glimpse into a rigorously spiritual alternative. Its calmness, its reflection, is full of allure.
  12. Filled with bleak, beautiful Hopperesque tableaus and strange characters whose lives intersect.
  13. With its mix of Lewis Carroll and William Gibson; Japanese anime and Chinese chopsocky; mythological allusions, and machine-made illusion, offers a couple of hours of escapist fun.
  14. Until a final conflict that more resembles a monster-truck jam than a superhero showdown, Iron Man is solid gold.
  15. Eastwood and Morgan's movie, with its epic natural disasters (and a terrifying, man-made one) is optimistic. Hokey, even. But it's beautiful, too.
  16. Its stars - especially the photogenic Leung and Cheung, fresh from Wong Kar Wai's jazzy romance In the Mood for Love - are wonderfully charismatic. And wonderfully athletic.
  17. Quiet, quirky gem.
  18. Wondrously emotional film, one that sneakily dismantles your defenses and purges grief you didn't realize you had.
  19. Fused with paranoia and almost unbearable suspense, The Hurt Locker is powerful stuff.
  20. At once guileless and profound.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  21. The Proposition, a beautiful, bloody meditation on justice, family, and the trap of retribution, is in every respect an artful addition to the canon of six-shooter morality tales.
  22. If you enjoy visuals with substance as well as flash, look no further than this exuberant movie.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  23. In the end, what the movie is about: time and life, and what we do with them, and what we regret that we didn't do.
  24. It is not to everyone's taste. But if you like the lush film operas of Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Douglas Sirk, or Luchino Visconti, this one's for you.
  25. The script by Andrea Berloff is stunning in its simplicity and aching details.
  26. This is magnificent filmmaking, and a magnificent film.
  27. Cholodenko takes us inside a bohemian hive where everyone buzzes around the Queen Bee. McDormand is superb. Likewise Bale and Nivola.
  28. The less said about the twists and turns The Illusionist takes, the better. Suffice to say, Eisenheim's masterful deceptions do not stop when he exits the stage.
  29. It is the more satisfying of the two installments - less over-the-top, arterial-gushing violence and more investigation into character, motives, back-story.
  30. An extraordinarily perfect little film: A bittersweet drama that explores sexuality and love, and their reverberations across the landscape of human emotions.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer

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