Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,442 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Moonrise Kingdom
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
3,442 movie reviews
  1. Acting-wise, the showstopper is Jason Bateman, with a diabolically entertaining turn as a smarmy PR man remarkably free with confidential information.
  2. ILYM is the comedy that Rudd lovers have been waiting for since he first charmed us silly in "Clueless." It explores both the dweeby and heartthrobby sides of this guy whose crooked smile fails to mask his social anxiety.
  3. A frightening portrait of corruption, cynicism, intimidation, greed and violence, Gomorrah is tough stuff.
  4. An extraordinary work in three movements about the Sasakis, a seemingly ordinary family. In this unpredictable work, the clan implodes, explodes, and glues itself back together.
  5. Not just a great sports movie, Harvard Beats Yale 29-29 captures a pivotal moment in recent history.
  6. Forceful, heart-wrenching stuff.
  7. Impossibly charming and impossibly French.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    For Kudlow, for whom "music lives forever" - it's never over. And the opportunity to seize the day continues to present itself in this deeply human documentary.
  8. All in all, this phenomenal film illustrates Alexis de Tocqueville's observation that "The people get the government they deserve." In both meanings of the word, Il Divo is sensational.
  9. A sly and surprisingly sublime little noir romance.
  10. A slow-burning, character-rich study in desperation, grief, vengeance, loyalty, and love. It's the sort of arthouse entry - in German, mostly - that gets you thinking about an English-language remake.
  11. Quietly and keenly observed, Summer Hours nods to Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" (a country estate, a family reunion, an impending sale). Assayas displays a lucid sense of how personal history and family identity are inextricably linked to a physical place - here, to a house that is still busy accumulating its memories.
  12. Even if you don't give a shiitake mushroom about food, there's much to savor in this lively comedy with dramatic aftertastes.
  13. Fused with paranoia and almost unbearable suspense, The Hurt Locker is powerful stuff.
  14. A heart-grabbing, awe-inspiring work that needs no embellishment.
  15. The rare movie that manages to convey the inner soul of an artist.
  16. A wise, wistful study of hope and dread.
  17. You watch a Miyazaki film with the pie-eyed, gape-mouthed awe of a child being read the most fantastic story and suddenly transported to places previously beyond the limits of imagination. It's quite a trip.
  18. The film billed as the first Disney animation to boast an African American "princess" is really about a resourceful bootstrapper in New Orleans, a young woman allergic to the fairy-tale pap spoon-fed to young girls.
  19. An eco-mentary that's as passionate and persuasive an argument for change as "An Inconvenient Truth."
  20. On a deeper level, the Dardennes' film offers a portrait of a fragile yet determined woman set on making a home for herself in the world, even as that world unravels before her eyes.
  21. A heartbreaking film that speaks to the lifelong aftershocks of war, and to the powerful bonds of family and of love.
  22. Avatar delivers. Combining beyond-state-of-the-art moviemaking with a tried-and-true storyline and a gamer-geek sensibility - not to mention a love angle, an otherworldly bestiary, and an arsenal of 22d-century weaponry - the movie quite simply rocks.
  23. At once noble and naive, earnest and a tad obnoxious.
  24. What's less clear, and more maddening, is how several generations of Ecuadorans have been left to live on toxic land, their health and livelihoods compromised, while lawyers file motions and counter-motions and blame is passed around.
  25. Disarming and unexpectedly poignant, An Education contrasts the knowledge learned in school with that learned from life.
  26. Suffers from several goofily tacky animated reenactments and a music score that unnecessarily underlines the significance of key events, but for those who lived through the turmoil of Vietnam, and for the generations that have come since, the film is an important document in its own right.
  27. Although its tone is generally genial and jovial, Good Hair touches on some tricky issues, at times complicitly.
  28. This is magnificent filmmaking, and a magnificent film.
  29. Linklater's film adaptation succeeds in bringing the flamboyant Welles to life.

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