Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,475 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Inside Llewyn Davis
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
3,475 movie reviews
  1. It's Greengrass' way of asking a question that looms large in these post-9/11 days: Are we all praying to the same God, or is one man's God better than another, and one man's God vastly more terrifying?
  2. Isn't like the classic Japanese drama "Rashomon," which suggested that one person's perspective of an event gave him a different truth from the person standing elsewhere.
  3. Big hair. Big mouths. Big scams. Everything about American Hustle, David O. Russell's wild and woolly take on the late-'70s FBI sting operation code-named Abscam, is big. And the biggest thing of all is the love story that beats at the heart of this rollicking disco-era ensemble piece.
  4. A visually dazzling mood piece.
  5. Persepolis, the superb film based on Satrapi's graphic memoirs of the same name, is a riveting odyssey in pictures and words. It's unlike any journal you've read or any animated movie you've seen.
  6. This year's must-see film.
  7. Lives is a best-foreign-film nominee competing in a year that at least three movies in this category are stronger than Oscar's best-picture contenders.
  8. It's action opera, sword-and-sorcery song-and-dance, and it's a heart-pumping, jaw-dropping thrill. OK, so I kind of like the thing.
  9. He had the fearlessness of a 104-story man and something more than a daredevil's brass.
  10. Pitch-perfect and profoundly moving.
  11. Baron Cohen brings scary conviction to the performance.
  12. The Dardennes are aces at these small-scale human dramas, and Two Days, One Night is almost without flaw.
  13. Lucid, concise and devastating account of what went wrong in Iraq, patiently counts those 500 ways.
  14. A quietly soulful study of two very different men.
  15. Selma may be flawed, even spurious at points. But in its larger portrait of a man of dignity, purpose, and courage, and in Oyelowo's performance as that man, the film rings true.
  16. Yun's performance is remarkable. The journey Mija takes is painful and hard and - for us, watching - sublime.
  17. Strangely, wonderfully, The Artist feels as bold and innovative a moviegoing experience as James Cameron's bells-and-whistles Avatar did a couple of years ago. Retro becomes nuevo. Quaint becomes cool.
  18. It's a trippy but tender examination of human emotions, relationships, all-consuming love.
  19. One of the great war movies - or antiwar movies - of all time.
  20. This simple story of a Guy and a Girl and their music is very appealing.
  21. One of the rare rock films that produces the effect of a live concert: After each number, the audience erupts into applause.
  22. There's a loneliness at the heart of this world, and Ghost World, that's really touching -- and a bit scary, too.
  23. That rare thing, a Hollywood teen flick transfigured into something like pubescent scripture: In the beginning, there was lust; in the end, there is knowledge.
  24. Miller and Futterman tell their story with plain, uninflected film language, permitting the ambiguities to surface. Theirs is not the anti-capital-punishment tract of Richard Brooks' excellent 1967 film "In Cold Blood." It is a story about an accomplice to crime who lived to tell the story.
  25. Whiplash is writer/director Damien Chazelle's hyperventilated nightmare about artistic struggle, artistic ambition. It's as much a horror movie as it is a keenly realized indie about jazz, about art, about what it takes to claim greatness.
  26. A profoundly unnerving historical document.
  27. Sustaining illusion with marvelous grace is, in a nutshell, exactly what Anderson is all about.
  28. Blue Is the Warmest Color explores a life with a depth and force that would be scary - if it weren't so scarily good.
  29. This is a complicated story, but it's efficiently laid out by Poitras in this smartly edited project. She has posed Citizenfour as the final piece of a post-9/11 trilogy that began with "My Country, My Country" (about the 2006 elections in Iran) and "The Oath" (about Guantanamo).
  30. This is a documentarylike film about a man who creates a castle in the air and then moves right in, the "Harold and the Purple Crayon" of the workplace.

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