Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,662 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 United 93
Lowest review score: 0 Surviving Christmas
Score distribution:
3,662 movie reviews
  1. In part, the documentary answers the question of why some couples flourish and others flounder.
  2. The pair are scrappy and smart and riff off each other like a no-budget, indie version of Tracy and Hepburn. It's impossible not to like them, and there's absolutely no reason not to.
  3. It's a haunting, scary, funny, sad portrayal from Rourke.
  4. Skyfall is certainly the most cultured Bond film to come along in some time. It's also the first of the three Craig endeavors to seriously (and wittily) acknowledge its pedigree.
  5. Dense, richly textured, and emotionally fraught - uplifting and devastating in equal parts - Shane Carruth's masterful sophomore effort is an abstract, elusive, but emotionally engaging love story that's more tone poem than drama.
  6. Goblet of Fire, fourth in the fantasy franchise, is the most fun and the most fraught with conflict.
  7. A superb, violent, jarring and daring documentary.
  8. A rocking, rollicking crowd-pleaser.
  9. It is an exploitation picture disguised as a hipster comedy.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  10. (Director Lionel Coleman) wisely opts for a straightforward approach with long takes that capture Cho's kinetic rhythm and rely on her talent and honed timing to carry the evening.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  11. The $200 million result is an irresistibly entertaining, if grandiose, saga of doomed love and directorial hubris.
  12. Tonally askew (Altman-esque one minute, Austin Powers-esque the next), Inherent Vice is a sun-glared, neon-limned muddle of noir plotline and potheaded jokery that not only doesn't make sense, but actually seems to try hard not to.
  13. The raw emotions on display need no translation. David Mackenzie directs the film in a piercingly realistic style. His ingenious decision to forgo a score makes Starred Up even more immersive, because all you hear is the dehumanizing din of prison.
  14. Midnight in Paris is not a perfect movie - as in "Julie & Julia" one senses its creator's impatience to leave the bleached-out present for the colorful past. But it is warm and effortless, qualities that make it embraceable.
  15. While it's too slight a movie for overpraise, there are such a serenity of vision and clarity of purpose to these characters that we easily are caught up in the boys' struggle to reunite mother and child.
  16. Smart, funny, and gross (often at the same time).
  17. There is a lot of shield-your-eyes ickiness in District 9, a lot of violence and gore. What there is not a lot of, however, is humanity - even in the film's depiction of the inhumanity humans are capable of.
  18. While I liked the film's aesthetics and its futurist imaginings, its most important attraction is how it engages. Some movies massage you; others tickle you. This one jacks you into cyberspace, involving you psychically and physically.
  19. Ai Weiwei comes off as a man on a singular mission: to record the life around him before it is erased or distorted by a repressive government terrified by the smallest sign of nonconformity. His primary weapons: video cameras and Twitter.
  20. A masterful epic charting love's labyrinths.
  21. It is, without doubt, a transcendent endeavor, from its exhilaratingly smart screenplay - director David O. Russell's adaptation of the novel by former South Jersey teacher Matthew Quick - to the unexpected and moving turns of its two leads.
  22. The most challenging obstacle encountered by reformers like Canada and Michelle Rhee, the embattled chancellor of education for Washington, D.C., are the unions extending tenure protection to teachers who underperform.
  23. Through Herzog's eyes it is a desolate, strangely beautiful frozen Edenish hell where the planet, having shaken out its pockets, lets the loners, fanatics and cosmologist-crackpots fall to bottom.
  24. The Martian is never less than engaging, and often much more than that.
  25. Wendy and Lucy is modest, minimalist. But it nonetheless reverberates like a sonic boom.
  26. Although The Secret in Their Eyes has neither the power, the artistry, nor the electric energy of its fellow Oscar nominee, France's "A Prophet," the Argentine film nonetheless engages with style, suspense, and seriousness of intent. Criminal intent and otherwise.
  27. Brilliantly detailed, richly painted portrait.
  28. It's not a pretty picture. But Food, Inc. is an essential one.
  29. Tony Takitani, fablelike and beautiful, requires a certain amount of patience, but its small, peculiar charms work their way into your soul.
  30. A movie like Everlasting Moments comes along maybe once in a decade.

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