Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,606 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Metropolis (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Isn't She Great
Score distribution:
3,606 movie reviews
  1. The $200 million result is an irresistibly entertaining, if grandiose, saga of doomed love and directorial hubris.
  2. Like Connery - but in different proportions - Craig is earthy and erotic, holding himself like a smoking gun.
  3. Tonally askew (Altman-esque one minute, Austin Powers-esque the next), Inherent Vice is a sun-glared, neon-limned muddle of noir plotline and potheaded jokery that not only doesn't make sense, but actually seems to try hard not to.
  4. The raw emotions on display need no translation. David Mackenzie directs the film in a piercingly realistic style. His ingenious decision to forgo a score makes Starred Up even more immersive, because all you hear is the dehumanizing din of prison.
  5. Midnight in Paris is not a perfect movie - as in "Julie & Julia" one senses its creator's impatience to leave the bleached-out present for the colorful past. But it is warm and effortless, qualities that make it embraceable.
  6. While it's too slight a movie for overpraise, there are such a serenity of vision and clarity of purpose to these characters that we easily are caught up in the boys' struggle to reunite mother and child.
  7. Smart, funny, and gross (often at the same time).
  8. There is a lot of shield-your-eyes ickiness in District 9, a lot of violence and gore. What there is not a lot of, however, is humanity - even in the film's depiction of the inhumanity humans are capable of.
  9. While I liked the film's aesthetics and its futurist imaginings, its most important attraction is how it engages. Some movies massage you; others tickle you. This one jacks you into cyberspace, involving you psychically and physically.
  10. Ai Weiwei comes off as a man on a singular mission: to record the life around him before it is erased or distorted by a repressive government terrified by the smallest sign of nonconformity. His primary weapons: video cameras and Twitter.
  11. A masterful epic charting love's labyrinths.
  12. It is, without doubt, a transcendent endeavor, from its exhilaratingly smart screenplay - director David O. Russell's adaptation of the novel by former South Jersey teacher Matthew Quick - to the unexpected and moving turns of its two leads.
  13. The most challenging obstacle encountered by reformers like Canada and Michelle Rhee, the embattled chancellor of education for Washington, D.C., are the unions extending tenure protection to teachers who underperform.
  14. Through Herzog's eyes it is a desolate, strangely beautiful frozen Edenish hell where the planet, having shaken out its pockets, lets the loners, fanatics and cosmologist-crackpots fall to bottom.
  15. Wendy and Lucy is modest, minimalist. But it nonetheless reverberates like a sonic boom.
  16. Brilliantly detailed, richly painted portrait.
  17. It's not a pretty picture. But Food, Inc. is an essential one.
  18. Tony Takitani, fablelike and beautiful, requires a certain amount of patience, but its small, peculiar charms work their way into your soul.
  19. A movie like Everlasting Moments comes along maybe once in a decade.
  20. As lovingly written as it is beautifully rendered.
  21. Melancholia is a remarkable mood piece with visuals to die for (excuse the pun), and a performance from Dunst that runs the color spectrum of emotions.
  22. The heroine of this story is the eloquent Mamie Till-Mobley, Emmett's mother, who recalls her fight to have an open-casket funeral for her son.
  23. The Queen of Versailles combines the voyeuristic thrills of reality TV with the soul-revealing artistry of great portraiture and the head-shaking revelations of solid investigative reporting.
  24. A loving, dopey documentary about the bird man of a place with a view of Alcatraz.
  25. The film's climax involves a father and son reunion that is tense, tragic and, finally, as transcendent as Mohammad himself.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  26. Bielinsky's movie builds like a poker game in which the players, having invested everything, cannot afford to fold.
  27. A superbly researched and edited documentary about the women's movement in the 1960s.
  28. Saraband, flat and static both visually and thematically, doesn't begin to approximate the austere beauty of the director's art-house classics.
  29. In refusing to pigeonhole its characters, Nine Lives is less like those L.A. road-rage melodramas "Short Cuts" and "Crash" than those all-of-us-are-interconnected dramas "Amores Perros" and "21 Grams."
  30. Andre Techine creates living characters instead of sociopolitical symbols.

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