Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,910 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Not One Less
Lowest review score: 0 A Little Bit of Heaven
Score distribution:
3910 movie reviews
  1. Lucid, concise and devastating account of what went wrong in Iraq, patiently counts those 500 ways.
  2. There is intrigue. There is suspense. Guilt - a man's guilt, a nation's - hangs heavy in the air.
  3. A quietly soulful study of two very different men.
  4. Selma may be flawed, even spurious at points. But in its larger portrait of a man of dignity, purpose, and courage, and in Oyelowo's performance as that man, the film rings true.
  5. Strangely, wonderfully, The Artist feels as bold and innovative a moviegoing experience as James Cameron's bells-and-whistles Avatar did a couple of years ago. Retro becomes nuevo. Quaint becomes cool.
  6. It's a trippy but tender examination of human emotions, relationships, all-consuming love.
  7. One of the great war movies - or antiwar movies - of all time.
  8. This simple story of a Guy and a Girl and their music is very appealing.
  9. One of the rare rock films that produces the effect of a live concert: After each number, the audience erupts into applause.
  10. There's a loneliness at the heart of this world, and Ghost World, that's really touching -- and a bit scary, too.
  11. That rare thing, a Hollywood teen flick transfigured into something like pubescent scripture: In the beginning, there was lust; in the end, there is knowledge.
  12. Miller and Futterman tell their story with plain, uninflected film language, permitting the ambiguities to surface. Theirs is not the anti-capital-punishment tract of Richard Brooks' excellent 1967 film "In Cold Blood." It is a story about an accomplice to crime who lived to tell the story.
  13. Whiplash is writer/director Damien Chazelle's hyperventilated nightmare about artistic struggle, artistic ambition. It's as much a horror movie as it is a keenly realized indie about jazz, about art, about what it takes to claim greatness.
  14. A profoundly unnerving historical document.
  15. At its satirical best, Things to Come takes aim at some of the sacred cows of French academia, showing how the posturing of today’s radical kids seems to repeat the attitudes their parents had in the '60s.
  16. Sustaining illusion with marvelous grace is, in a nutshell, exactly what Anderson is all about.
  17. Blue Is the Warmest Color explores a life with a depth and force that would be scary - if it weren't so scarily good.
  18. This is a complicated story, but it's efficiently laid out by Poitras in this smartly edited project. She has posed Citizenfour as the final piece of a post-9/11 trilogy that began with "My Country, My Country" (about the 2006 elections in Iran) and "The Oath" (about Guantanamo).
  19. This is a documentarylike film about a man who creates a castle in the air and then moves right in, the "Harold and the Purple Crayon" of the workplace.
  20. A heartbreaking elegy to mature love that honors the lovers and the long, neurodegenerative tango that is their last.
  21. The matchless Alberto Sordi - a contemporary of Peters Sellers and a progenitor of Steve Martin - stars as the buffoon Everyman, Antonio Badalamenti, a perfectly poised figure destined for the pratfall.
  22. It is a damning indictment of the individuals and institutions who made money while customers lost their shirts.
  23. Jackson's superior sequel to last year's first installment in his Rings cycle - resurrects the beloved Gandalf (majestic Ian McKellen) and rejuvenates the audience, too.
  24. It's aimed at adults as much as children, with jokes that work on multiple levels, and contraptions.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  25. Under Hooper's deft direction, it packs the suspense of a thriller.
  26. And Bridges? What's there to say about a man who makes it look so easy, and who - in one breathless, pivotal scene - runs through a range of emotion like a wild pony running across the land. Genius, any way you look at it.
  27. Up
    The exhilarating film pays tribute to Buster Keaton's "The Balloonatic" by way of its slapstick, and to Hayao Miyazaki's "Howl's Moving Castle" by way of its watercolor palette and traveling domicile.
  28. Wake in Fright is essential viewing for anyone interested in the roots of male violence.
  29. Singular and stunning.
  30. Toy Story 2, like its forebear, will stand the test of time.

Top Trailers