Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,662 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Before Sunset
Lowest review score: 0 Surviving Christmas
Score distribution:
3,662 movie reviews
  1. Trueba's movie is nearly undone by its shapelessness. Because the filmmaker imposes little in the way of form (or drama) on his subject, his film is a good listen without being a particularly good watch.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  2. Steeped in quiet despair, Lantana is a psychological thriller that emphasizes the psychology over the thrills. It's a smart, heart-twisting picture.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  3. The rare movie that manages to convey the inner soul of an artist.
  4. Like Johnny's rants, Naked is a revelation, a parable of spiritual homelessness and the terror it engenders.
  5. For its mesmerizing first two-thirds, Van Sant keeps the film tightly focused on his subject, superbly played by Penn and intimately shot, home-movie style, by Harris Savides. But when the director pulls back to detail Harvey Milk's fight against gay backlash, Milk gets derailed. And - dare I say it? - didactic.
  6. Like this diabolically designed weapon of war, Tanovic's film is coil-sprung to explode on the unsuspecting.
  7. The movie is, start to finish, candy-colored angst.
  8. Ann Savage, the femme fatale from a slew of old Hollywood noirs, is savagely funny as Maddin's beauty-parlor proprietress mom.
  9. So incrementally does Eastwood's film build toward what seems like an inevitable resolution that when it concludes, you're sucker-punched. You haven't been watching a police procedural, but a Greek tragedy. You haven't been watching a drama about the catharsis of vigilantism, but sitting vigil for a community diminished, and permanently damaged, by violence.
  10. Quietly and keenly observed, Summer Hours nods to Chekhov's "The Cherry Orchard" (a country estate, a family reunion, an impending sale). Assayas displays a lucid sense of how personal history and family identity are inextricably linked to a physical place - here, to a house that is still busy accumulating its memories.
  11. Late in Looper, when a highly telekinetic kid starts levitating things, it really does look like Christopher Nolan had wandered onto the set and taken over.
  12. By recording this all too commonplace and dehumanizing process, Puiu's film shows the sick old man and the strangers who deal with him to be all too human - extraordinarily so.
  13. The humor of the script constantly confounds expectations, and yet Shrek still manages to say all the right things to children.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  14. Kings and Queen, full of passion and humor, madness and grief, is close to a masterpiece. It's like life: messy, impossible, elating, unavoidable.
  15. Insightful and involving.
  16. What this unclassifiable story may lack in decibels, it has in emotional depth. At once a mystery, a family drama, a snapshot of children at risk, Ballast is an unusually perceptive character study more eloquent in action than in dialogue.
  17. Funny as it is fierce, breathtaking as it is life-affirming.
  18. Few American directors drive this wedge between mind and gut as masterfully as Michael Mann.
  19. Clooney has never been better, subtler, more deeply rooted in a performance than he is in The Descendants. And he's funny, too.
  20. A wicked deconstruction of a dysfunctional clan: brothers at each other's throats; a father whose legacy is anger and betrayal; an unfaithful wife; a history of deceit. It's a horror show of hatred and festering psychic wounds.
  21. Swinton is delightful in a twisted turn as Wilford's enforcer, a Margaret Thatcherian dragon lady who adores watching her men torture miscreants who have defied the train's No. 1 rule: Know your place.
  22. Stays with you like great movies tend to do. It asks you to examine the inner mechanisms of human beings, cheerful and miserable alike. It's not about looking at a glass half empty or a glass half full. It's about drinking down what's in that glass and letting it fill your soul.
  23. Ain't nothin' but a party, y'all.
  24. Underlines the nightmare of entrapment so vividly captured in The Day I Became a Woman.
  25. A film full of a sense of impending danger, betrayal, seduction and destruction. Quite simply, it's great stuff.
  26. McConaughey's performance isn't just about the weight loss. It's about gaining compassion, even wisdom, and it's awesome.
  27. An eco-mentary that's as passionate and persuasive an argument for change as "An Inconvenient Truth."
  28. A mordantly funny, clear-eyed view of an extended family's mounting dysfunction in a changing society.
  29. Crazy Heart is the real thing, and a real gem.
  30. The film speaks to fundamental issues of history, truth, and the philosophical conflicts of humankind.

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