Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,538 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Black Souls
Lowest review score: 0 Rambo
Score distribution:
3,538 movie reviews
  1. It can feel inchoate, dropping the viewer in the middle of events without much context, and it exacts an emotional toll. But its raw quality also makes it compelling viewing.
  2. Stays with you like great movies tend to do. It asks you to examine the inner mechanisms of human beings, cheerful and miserable alike. It's not about looking at a glass half empty or a glass half full. It's about drinking down what's in that glass and letting it fill your soul.
  3. The rare movie that manages to convey the inner soul of an artist.
  4. It's a devilishly twisted affair.
  5. Collins and Pacino plumb the depths of acting, of Shakespeare, of the difference between law and justice.
  6. La Promesse is a compelling look at issues that - in a world where ethnic frictions grow more tense, even as national boundaries disappear - really are universal.
  7. Chuan's unsettlingly beautiful black-and-white, wide-screen account of those nightmare six weeks, re-creates that horror in ways that are at once allusive and lucid, mixing cinematic impressionism with documentary-like detail.
  8. Very few of us would like to think about the physical and emotional toll that life in captivity takes on these magnificent creatures. Gabriela Cowperthwaite's powerful, heartbreaking, and beautifully crafted documentary, Blackfish, forces us to do just that.
  9. Proves that the most local story is sometimes the most universal, the simplest tale sometimes the most complex.
  10. Her life, and her work, transcended what we think of as "fashion."
  11. A far more trenchant - and funnier - satire of the fame-afflicted than Woody Allen's "Celebrity."
  12. Ai Weiwei comes off as a man on a singular mission: to record the life around him before it is erased or distorted by a repressive government terrified by the smallest sign of nonconformity. His primary weapons: video cameras and Twitter.
  13. Although the pervading mood of Twin Falls Idaho - a beautifully shot, noirish thing - is one of sadness and loss, the Polishes' film is playful, too.
  14. First-time filmmaker Kolirin paces his can-we-all-just-get-along? parable as if it were a silent comedy, which for long stretches it is. This movie about musicians has no soundtrack. Its musical moments are few, but potent.
  15. Tcheng finds Simons in moments of haughty self-confidence and tremulous self-doubt.
  16. A superb film that begins with death, ends in renewal, and finds almost as much to laugh about as to cry for.
  17. A gorgeous confection, packed with gargantuan gowns and pornographic displays of pastrystuffs, Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette is also a sharp, smart look at the isolation, ennui and supercilious affairs of the rich, famous and famously pampered.
  18. Rain is a quiet, disquieting triumph.
  19. What gives North Country urgency is that it's about how a man comes to understand that it's bad for him and for his community to deny his daughter privileges and prerogatives he'd grant his son.
  20. An amiable mix of "Grumpy Old Men" comedy and "Apollo 13" can-we-fix-this-jalopy-before-we-die? Drama.
  21. David Ayer, the writer of "Training Day," director of "Street Kings," writer/director of "Harsh Times," does not make movies about princesses with witchy curses, about yuppie commitment-phobes, about talking plush toys. His territory is narrow, but he owns it: cops, in Los Angeles.
  22. Tender but never sappy, Monsieur Ibrahim brings two people of vastly different age and background together in ways that are touching, and telling. It's a small, glowing gem.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    For Kudlow, for whom "music lives forever" - it's never over. And the opportunity to seize the day continues to present itself in this deeply human documentary.
  23. Roiling with laughter, tears, drunken confessions, revelatory soliloquies, pain, sorrow, hospital visits, and various kinds of love, A Christmas Tale is a smart, sprawling, and sublimely entertaining feast.
  24. A sly and surprisingly sublime little noir romance.
  25. A gorgeous operatic tale of obsession and madness.
  26. Macdonald's film brilliantly telescopes the '70s, an era when every physical action had its equal and opposite political reaction.
  27. A beautifully mopey adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro's much-praised novel.
  28. Career Girls doesn't have the sweep of Secrets & Lies, nor the venom of Naked (which also featured the riveting Cartlidge). But in the small world it keenly describes, the film packs an emotional punch - silly voices and all.
  29. Corinne's journey begins with an act of blind faith. The movie ends, but you have a palpable sense that the journey does not.

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