Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,897 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Her
Lowest review score: 0 Surviving Christmas
Score distribution:
3897 movie reviews
  1. Keanu doesn't go far enough. Key & Peele was searing and incisive about race and American culture, and Keanu doesn't even scratch the surface.
  2. A sappy excursion to Edwardian days.
  3. Think Jerry Lewis doing Eminem, or maybe it's Eminem doing Jerry Lewis (or maybe it's Pauly Shore doing Vanilla Ice), and you've got B-Rad.
  4. Despite a winning performance by Anna Faris, the cutest thing in platform shoes since Goldie Hawn, the film falls on its keister so many times that before long the perky pinkness turns bruising black-and-blue.
  5. Preposterous, if diverting, revenge fantasy that rivals Rambo in sheer narrative chutzpah and vigilantism.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  6. There are sniff movies and there are snuff movies, but Perfume: The Story of a Murderer is both. It has the bouquet of balm and blood. Imagine "Fragrance of the Lambs."
  7. Clark denies his audience the catharsis, resolution and renewal of classical tragedy. The film reduces its viewers to helplessness, and I'm not sure that's its intent.
  8. The moral of this crude, intermittently funny Adam Sandler comedy costarring the reliable Kevin James is that: It's OK to be gay, it's not OK to call someone a faggot, and it takes a real man to admit he loves his man pal.
  9. A tepid PG-13 iteration of the already lame 1979 genre classic "The Amityville Horror."
  10. A bummer.
  11. A tired, cobbled-together concoction.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  12. The film is completely forgettable, frequently funny and weirdly satisfying in a Jersey Loser Gets Respect kind of way.
  13. What Raising Helen doesn't offer is a competent (never mind compelling) performance from Hudson, who is as cute as lace pants and has approximately as much acting skill.
  14. A vaguely creepy and mildly diverting rom-com.
  15. Has the disjointed feel of a bunch of strung-together TV episodes.
  16. This one has some originality, even though it unfolds like Ingmar Bergman's divorce melodrama "Scenes From a Marriage" - without the marriage.
  17. Watching people be miserable with each other for the movie's run-time does not always make for a pleasant experience.
  18. Because the movie is about addictive behavior dulling the pain of grief rather than in the larger drama of dealing with grief, the movie reduces the scope of Hoffman's performance.
  19. A deeply disturbing, intimate, and not unsuccessful look at 10 years in the life of a young boy, Harlon, who grows up to become a Columbine-style killer.
  20. Maybe the best reason to see Papa: Hemingway in Cuba is to catch a glimpse of the real Finca Vigia, the property, with its house and pool, gardens, and tree-lined drive, where Ernest Hemingway lived and wrote - and famously drank - from 1939 until 1960. Pages of For Whom the Bell Tolls were banged out here; so, too, The Old Man and the Sea.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It can be broadly funny when it does not lapse into lazy "Dukes of Hazzard" caricature, which is often.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  21. Despite the competent animation, the great tunes, and funny voice work by costars Russell Brand and John Cleese, Trolls is a lackluster entry. The story is clichéd and predictable. Overall, the film has no real magic.
  22. It would be inaccurate to say there are plots in New Year's Eve. There are a number of setups, and these get shuffled through faster than a card dealer in Atlantic City.
  23. Level of humor: subteen.
  24. In the future, in the past, at all points along the space-time continuum, the Theory of the Teenage Male Mind throws everything out of whack.
  25. However terrific Murray is, if Antonio Banderas, mellifluous voice of Puss-in-Boots in "Shrek 2," went paw to claw with Garfield, Puss would definitely triumph.
  26. In essence, a wild soap opera disguised as a political allegory, it's a movie, with its over-the-map performances, that is worth catching only for the inadvertent laugh or two.
  27. If it were a landscape painting, Gerry would deserve a place in the National Gallery. But as a movie...deserves its own wing in The Old Curiosity Shop.
  28. Given the filmmaker's privileged perspective of hindsight, to not consider the real-world repercussions of their theater, to not connect the dots between 1968 and 2008 is a squandered opportunity.
  29. It falls short of the mark, even as it hits every one of the genre's conventions.
  30. Visually immersive but emotionally uninvolving.
  31. This hotly anticipated film delivers on the premise of its celebrated title. But it offers little more in terms of suspense, originality or enjoyment. Mostly, it lays there on the screen like a big lazy boa.
  32. With pratfalls and teardrops, the film swings from sitcom to sit-dram.
  33. Sadly, director Lee Toland Krieger's offering, a weak wanna-be Jean Cocteau-esque fable with magical realist pretensions, does great disservice to Lively and her remarkably accomplished costars.
  34. Iridescent as each of the actors is, the result is like a handful of beads without the connecting string.
  35. It's not fresh and irreverent, qualities we admire in Allen. It is recycled and irrelevant.
  36. Grant's film plays like a two-hour episode of "Friends" intercut with "Seventh Heaven." Those sounds you hear are wisecrack, heartbreak, heartbreak, wisecrack, wisecrack.
  37. If only the screenplay had more going for it than hackneyed homilies and living-in-the-ghetto stereotypes. If only first-time director Sunu Gonera had a surer hand, a knack for something bolder, wilder, goofier.
  38. It's nothing more than a sophisticated clone of the original, and it really overdoes the shaky-camera thing - even more than in some of the worst found-footage movies The Blair Witch Project spawned.
  39. Phase II has some nice comic touches, but it's a forgettable B-movie.
  40. While The Sitter isn't that dumb, or dreadful, there really isn't much going on here.
  41. Like most Lee films, She Hate Me is gasp-worthy, with something to offend everyone. I will not say that I liked it. I will say that like "Bamboozled," it exasperates and resonates.
  42. Paradoxically fast-talking and laid back, Long's Bartleby appears to be the illegitimate child of Groucho Marx and Ferris Bueller, one whose schemes are far more impressive than his deeds.
  43. All in all, a resonant theme, poorly played.
  44. Quickly devolves into a violent thriller that resolves itself in sadomasochistic romance.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  45. Has a dark, low-budget feel and an incongruous combination of self-consciously jokey patter and gross-out gore.
  46. A big fat geek kiss to the movies of Steven Spielberg and his fanboys, Paul is a mild, meandering comedy.
  47. Shows glimmers of great drama, but jettisons too much essential cargo (character development, relationships, plot, common sense) in an effort to be lean and clean.
  48. Vacancy, in the end, simply offers a particularly aggressive brand of couples counseling.
  49. Gritty, jumpy and rife with cliches.
  50. The premise, which initially has a certain interior logic, grows implausible and then nonsensical.
  51. The real problem isn't with the actors, it's with 1) the source material, a highfalutin romance novel with a clever literary conceit, and 2) LaBute's clumsy, uncomfortable efforts to telescope Byatt's book into a workable movie.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's not original, but unlike some of this summer's movies (such as The Island and Stealth), The Cave knows its place. Its job is to deliver a few jolty thrills and a couple of laughs and wrap things up before it starts to get too dumb.
  52. Relying on improv-y riffing and watch-them-coming-from-down-the-block-and-around-the-corner sight gags, The Campaign is intermittently amusing, but more often just interminable.
  53. Begins with a scene of mass repentance, but the real sin here is a profligate waste of talent.
  54. Overstocked farce.
  55. The characters are (hand-painted) so flat that the film looks like a paper-doll convention at Epcot.
  56. Driven is in both its script and its execution a paint-by-numbers affair.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  57. What are you going to do when your lead actress offers a performance that's as unlikable as the woman she's portraying? Maybe it's the script (flimsy, formulaic), or filmmaker Alejandro Gomez Monteverde's conspicuous direction, but Tammy Blanchard's Nina, a waitress with a dour disposition and an unwanted pregnancy, pretty much sucks the life out of this well-meaning melodrama.
  58. A raunchy romp through the peeping-Tomism, potty humor, raging hormones and social humiliation that are standard issue in the Hollywood high-school sex comedy.
  59. There's nothing original, nor compelling, about Twist.
  60. Not even Halle Berry, emerging from the blue Caribbean in an orange two-piece -- can bring this thing to life.
  61. Feels more like a postscript than a probing, provocative documentary.
  62. A silly melodrama.
  63. It's not so much a miscalculation of his audience by Burton as it is a disregard. What lingers after Frankenweenie, far more than its stunning technique, is a sad suggestion of solipsism.
  64. Far-fetched and utterly humorless, with a literally tacked-on conclusion (yes, more text on the screen), the only thing that's surprising about Unbreakable is how lame it is.
  65. Like Clint Eastwood’s masterful 2006 WWII drama "Flags of Our Fathers," Lee’s film is as much about how we spin war stories as it is about war itself. Both involve a group of heroic soldiers sent home by the Pentagon to help drum up popular support. Both are made by filmmakers keenly aware that stories have the power to justify a war or turn the public against it.
  66. Cute, cloying and catastrophically predictable.
  67. This isn't a movie, it's an animatronic theme-park ride - an artificially processed, easily digestible treat for kids.Ho, ho hum.
  68. It's simplistic and reactionary and designed to get hearts pumping but not minds thinking.
  69. The film's intimations of bisexual romance have a certain innate drama that no amount of bad acting or cornball rugby matches can completely erase.
  70. The moral of Taken 2? If you're going on a family vacation, be sure that the human-trafficking ring you put out of business in that far more satisfying and suspenseful thriller from a few years ago doesn't know how to find you.
  71. To do this kind of satire successfully, you need the kind of merciless and unrelenting wit of films such as Gus Van Sant's "To Die For" or John Huston's "Prizzi's Honor."
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  72. Firth is brilliant as a preternaturally patient man - every day he has to tell her the same exact story. But he has a creepy way about him. Is it love that drives him, or something darker?
  73. Death Sentence's message - that vengeance is ultimately futile, spinning out a vicious circle of rage and hate - may be commendable, but there's nothing noteworthy about the way Wan, Bacon and their troops go about delivering it.
  74. Not to say that it isn't fun, only to say that it is more about sensation than sense.
  75. Owen is all right as the harried husband whose relationship at home has turned frosty, but the essential heat between him and Aniston is missing. The actress succeeds in shedding her "Friends" persona, but there's something missing here, especially as things get knottier.
  76. Saw
    The film is a squeamish exercise, like watching a cruel child pull the wings off flies - especially the climactic scene, which is so gory it would turn a coyote's stomach.
  77. While it misses the mark most of the time, director Hilary Brougher's film has a promising story, an impressive cast, and occasional moments of grace.
  78. The result is a movie that is both laugh-out-loud funny and cringe-worthily silent.
  79. Ultimately the voyage is so choppy and long (2 hours, 48 minutes) that into the third hour I found myself yawning, "Yo-ho-hum and a very sore bum."
  80. The whole thing is rather insipid. But Thomas makes it smoother and more palatable than it deserves to be.
  81. It isn't frightening. Sometimes, in fact, it's laughable.
  82. This invitation to look down upon the stupidity of numskulls is one that should be declined as swiftly as a call to poke fun at Special Olympians.
  83. With no clear idea how to end the movie, which has come to resemble an excessive episode of Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, writer/director Stuart Beattie (G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra) uses an old but still effective Hollywood trick: He blows up everything on the screen to smithereens.
  84. Roughly an hour in, Transformers 2 morphs from teen adventure into lumbering war movie. Bay and his screenwriters squander their human capital in order to show us scenes of 20-ton toys crushing 10-ton toys.
  85. A likable and completely dispensable heist film starring two of the deftest comedians working (Keaton and Latifah), the film from Callie Khouri is itself an American retread of the British caper telefilm "Hot Money."
  86. Virtually every set-up and set-piece in this extravagantly tedious adventure is misleading, or worse, irrelevant.
  87. It's nothing if not predictable.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  88. A preposterous, if admittedly fun, exercise in sci-fi/horror mayhem.
  89. While Last Days succeeds as a nature documentary, Van Sant fails to penetrate human nature. The result is a portrait without a face.
  90. There's nothing to say that crass can't be funny - and it sometimes is in Daley and Goldstein's iteration - but Vacation loses any of the ooey-gooey, family-friendly heart that made you really want Clark to get to Walley World to begin with.
  91. Nothing wrong about a movie that says, Stop and smell the roses. Now, if only director Rob Reiner hadn't rubbed our noses in a bouquet of plastic blooms.
  92. If you want to see a Renaissance faire turned into an apocalyptic battlefield, this is the ticket.
  93. Bleak and painfully earnest.
  94. For this dynamic to work, the actors need to be of complementary temperament and equal power. This is not the case.
  95. A long, tedious and convoluted follow-up to 2003's rollicking high-seas hit, The Curse of the Black Pearl, this second installment in the promised trilogy lacks the swash and buckle of the original. And then some.
  96. A gagfest that makes viewers gag at least twice as often as they giggle, American Wedding -- third in the American Pie trilogy -- whipsaws the audience between gross-out and guffaw.
  97. Premonition is an odd little thing, with a protagonist in a protracted fugue state and a plot that doesn't know whether its coming or going. Or maybe it does.
  98. Handsomely photographed by Eric Schmidt and nicely underplayed by the actors, the film relies too much on its jukebox soundtrack to convey mood.

Top Trailers