Philadelphia Inquirer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,538 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 70% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Black Souls
Lowest review score: 0 Rambo
Score distribution:
3,538 movie reviews
  1. There's a loneliness at the heart of this world, and Ghost World, that's really touching -- and a bit scary, too.
  2. Merchants of Doubt shouldn't be a hard sell. The fact that it is should make you very mad.
  3. The beautiful misery of The Deep Blue Sea - Terence Davies' crushing adaptation of Terence Rattigan's 1952 play - is almost too much.
  4. So disturbing, on so many levels.
  5. A terrific mystery, equal parts haunting love story and nimble thriller.
  6. A superb, violent, jarring and daring documentary.
  7. The Last Mountain, more than anything, asks us to consider where our energy comes from, and how we can bring about changes that benefit all of us and the planet we live on.
  8. A feverishly imaginative Freudian vampire film from Guy Maddin, is like a silent-movie serial by Louis Feuillade or an improbable collaboration between writer Oscar Wilde and photographer Man Ray.
  9. The lack of any readily identifiable star - no Cage, no McConaughey - makes Blue Ruin feel even more authentic, more rooted in this frightening world.
  10. Exhilarating and, ultimately, filled with a sense of existential dread.
  11. A classic of subversive surrealism.
    • Philadelphia Inquirer
  12. Whatever our misfortune, The Kite Runner says, sometimes we are fortunate enough to get a second chance to make amends for a first mistake.
  13. In the end, this earnest, inquisitive film leaves the viewer longing for some sanity, and some hope, in a world that appears to be seriously lacking in both.
  14. The Hedgehog is full of heart, passion, and human longing - but also a good dose of existentialism. Think of it as Sartre's "Being and Nothingness"-meets-Dr. Seuss.
  15. Smoking, shouting, practically shooting off sparks, Cruz spreads a wildfire sexuality across Allen's sunny tableau of Catalan country picnics and scenic Barcelona ramblings.
  16. The result is a movie about the many forms of social and sexual abuse that does not make the abusee a victim but victor.
  17. Pray the Devil Back to Hell is at once inspiring and horrific.
  18. Even if you don't give a shiitake mushroom about food, there's much to savor in this lively comedy with dramatic aftertastes.
  19. Exhilarating, exuberant and drolly funny.
  20. Client 9 speaks plenty of truth - about politics, power, human nature - even if you don't buy into the hit-job hypothesis.
  21. Elkabetz, alternately resigned and raging, stoic and sad, bitter humor in her eyes, is riveting. Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem takes its time to unfold, but like its star, the film presents its case in powerful, persuasive ways.
  22. Redmayne should be getting a lot of notice for his performance; it's palpable, it's poignant. Jones, too, is terrific. And Marsh, who won the documentary Academy Award for his Philippe Petit Twin Towers caper Man on Wire, brings a keen artistry to The Theory of Everything.
  23. L'Enfant begins with the birth of a child, but its real concern is the moral rebirth of a man.
  24. Cronenberg's movie is eerily compelling and darkly humorous. And chilling - to the bone.
  25. Bale is extraordinary, grinning like a kid, displaying wily intelligence, sinewy resolve and spirit - and a bit of craziness, too.
  26. Rare, too, is the way The Broken Circle Breakdown incorporates music into its narrative. The songs - traditional bluegrass and country, and a clutch of new ones rooted in same - are as integral to the characters and their relationships as the dialogue.
  27. There's no quick fix for a culture "addicted to debt," as one wag puts it in the film. But watching I.O.U.S.A. is a good place to start.
  28. Paddington is perfect for today's audiences, so long overfed on comic-book fodder. The bear's impeccable manners, perfect diction, and earnestness make him the ultimate anti-Bart Simpson.
  29. A likably energetic star vehicle for English sports god Vinnie Jones.
  30. Like its heroine, the film's glib - and sometimes sidesplittingly funny - patter at first diverts viewers from its poignant insights. Happily, as Juno grows in experience and maturity, so does the film.

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