Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,602 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Led Zeppelin II [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 Liz Phair
Score distribution:
6,602 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Dense, beautiful, intricate, haunting, explosive, and dangerous, this is everything rock music aspires to be: intense, incredible songs arranged perfectly and performed with skill and passion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Comparing this to other albums is like comparing an aquarium to blue construction paper.... It's the sound of a band, and its leader, losing faith in themselves, destroying themselves, and subsequently rebuilding a perfect entity. In other words, Radiohead hated being Radiohead, but ended up with the most ideal, natural Radiohead record yet.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is one of those albums people are going to obsess over for many years to come.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Complex and dangerously catchy, lyrically sophisticated and provocative, noisy and somehow serene, Wilco's aging new album is simply a masterpiece; it is equally magnificent in headphones, cars and parties.... No one is too good for this album; it is better than all of us.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A quarter-century after its first release, London Calling is still the concentrate essence of The Clash's unparalleled fervor.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This reissue on luxuriously hefty vinyl is the first time the album's been released in the U.S.--a superb opportunity to hear a record that's been occasionally imitated but never matched.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Quarantine the Past doesn't replace the albums, but it's a highly listenable alternative that is as much a treat for nostalgic older fans as it is a valuable gateway for new listeners.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If allowing Jagger to touch up those vocals was the price to pay to allow Exile receive the tribute it deserves, it's still a bargain.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The influence of Pinkerton led to hundreds of mostly regrettable bands, but what ultimately distinguishes Weezer is how they sonically mirror the unhinged and private mental terror of its narrator.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With his music and persona both marked by a flawed honesty, Kanye's man-myth dichotomy is at once modern and truly classic.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Despite how much better-left-forgotten material is being offered up here as essential, there's still more life in the real Nevermind than anything that's attempted to replicate its attack since.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What's here is brilliant, beautiful, and, most importantly, finally able to stand tall on its own.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Siamese Dream's songs don't blend into each other, but some transitions exist; each stands out in a brilliant sequence, forming perhaps the best concept album they ever made.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's a colossus of an album, the product of a band that was thinking huge, pushing itself to its limits, and devoted to breaking open its own understanding of what rock music could be.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Essentially perfect... It remains a landmark that hasn't aged a day.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Isn't Anything crystallizes MBV's unique dynamic.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the many great things about Liquid Swords is that while it's an unimpeachable work of lyrical mastery, of fierce intellect and sound morals, it's in no way a record for prudes.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As one of classic rock's foundational albums, it holds up better than any other commercial smash of that ilk.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The new version is in fact more textured and nuanced, but not at the expense of the album's bone-dry, brutalizing crunch. Most of its touch-ups are tastefully unobtrusive and illuminating.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If anything, the elucidating peek behind the curtain that Bangs’ documentary provides makes the album feel like an even more singular, remarkable achievement.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The bonus disc is a mildly interesting amalgam of alternate mixes and rough takes--the kind of stuff anyone but the most dedicated obsessives will listen to only once--and there’s little advance here lyrically from the debut, but II is still close to perfect.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 98 Critic Score
    For the first time, Modest Mouse craft an album, not a collection of songs. That they manage to go beyond any other rock band out there is staggering.... OK Computer must be mentioned, for Modest Mouse just got invited to the same club.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 97 Critic Score
    So long as we're unable or unwilling to fully recognize the healing aspect of embracing honest emotion in popular music, we will always approach the sincerity of an album like Funeral from a clinical distance. Still, that it's so easy to embrace this album's operatic proclamation of love and redemption speaks to the scope of The Arcade Fire's vision.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 96 Critic Score
    The exuberant overload of Blueberry Boat will thrill and transport you with the ineluctable force of a great children's story, one whose execution matches its imagination.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 96 Critic Score
    If the additions are what make this record distinctive, what's left out is what makes it brilliant.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 96 Critic Score
    It goes without saying that the Pixies' b-sides don't make for an average, run-of-the-mill outtakes compilation, as many of the songs are almost or equally as radiant as the more fortunate tracks that made it to the five classics between 1987 and 1991.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 96 Critic Score
    It's of the moment and feels new, but it's also striking in its immediacy and comes across as friendly and welcoming.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    With its illusory, ethereal production, wistful melodies, and oft-funereal pace, this is one of those rare albums that can completely absorb you in such a way as to almost dissolve the world around you, and make you feel like you've been transported to another realm of existence within the course of 58 minutes.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The Avalanches have managed to build a totally unique context for all these sounds, while still allowing each to retain its own distinct flavor. As a result, Since I Left You sounds like nothing else.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Loss, regret, and a minor key brilliantly permeate jangling guitars and rhythmic and tonal shifts-- and although it's no Closer or OK Computer, it's not unthinkable that this band might aspire to such heights.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    In trading the adolescent kick of Secaucus for ripened resignation, meticulous refinement for crippling maturation, they have realized their magnum opus.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The sprawling Late Registration is the year's most accomplished rap album, and in turn, he's done something that his heroes-- the Pharcyde and Nas, and father figure Jay-Z-- couldn't do: deliver on a promise the second time around.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Though omissions are certain to be an issue for cratedigging obsessives, this collection is as flawless a primer as has ever been made available on a single disc.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Live at Reading effectively grants you side-stage access to the band in their mosh-pit-stoking, drum-set-toppling, putting you as close to the action as the band's mysterious friend Tony, who's seen flailing onstage throughout the show like an epilpetic Bez.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    It's a rare thing for an album to have such a strong sense of what it wants to be. Bon Iver is about flow, from one scene and arrangement and song and memory and word into the next-- each distinct but connected-- all leading to "Beth/Rest".
    • 100 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    For die-hards, the most alluring part of the package may be the second compact disc, which features 18 mostly instrumental demos recorded in Gaye's post-What's Going On honeymoon period, when his vast artistic ambitions and abilities were being embraced by the greater public. These somewhat experimental demos--deep, in-the-pocket funk in the vein of Sly Stone, George Clinton, and Jimi Hendrix--clearly laid the groundwork for much of his subsequent 70s material.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The worthy additions in this "super deluxe edition" are nearly all visual.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Fahey was a restless listener, tinkerer, thinker, and player--a combination that makes this set fascinating both as a history book and a lifetime listening indulgence.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    While Channel Orange is stuffed with one-of-a-kind details and characters, its overall scope is grand, as is Ocean's.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    The miracle of this album is how it ties straightforward rap thrills--dazzling lyrical virtuosity, slick quotables, pulverizing beats, star turns from guest rappers--directly to its narrative.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Each fluorescent strike of noise, incongruous tempo flip, and warped vocal is bolted into its right place across the record's fast 40 minutes.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    III is, indirectly, Led Zeppelin’s own version of Pink Floyd's Meddle--the folky, pretty early record that was never too popular and hence a favorite of indie types skeptical of such a massive mainstream band.... III has easily the best bonus material too.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Sigur Rós effortlessly make music that is massive, glacial, and sparse..... They are the first vital band of the 21st Century.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Dizzee's despairing wail, focused anger, and cutting sonics places him on the front lines in the battle against a stultifying Britain, just as Pete Townshend, Johnny Rotten, and Morrissey have been in the past.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Madvillainy is inexhaustibly brilliant, with layer-upon-layer of carefully considered yet immediate hip-hop, forward-thinking but always close to its roots.... Good luck finding a better hip-hop album this year, mainstream, undie, or otherwise.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    [Finn] not only has a commanding, rousing voice but he also says something worth hearing, displaying gifts for both scope and depth that are all too rare in contemporary rock-- indie or mainstream.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Ys
    The people who hear this record will split into two crowds: The ones who think it's silly and precious, and the ones who, once they hear it, won't be able to live without it.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    You can feel the warmth pouring out of the music.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Despite the cries about careerism, they rarely settled into one spot for long, and even when they were correctly perceived to have done so--about one half of The Great Escape really is a Parklife retread--they were still spreading their collective wings on album tracks and B-sides.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    Part Lies makes a good case that their later period has value too, and that the group had raised the bar so high for themselves that merely being very good could be interpreted as a failure.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 94 Critic Score
    If Fleetwood Mac shimmered more, rocked less and were organic without being raw, that might suggest the level of evocative language and romance The Lone Bellow exudes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Nothing short of elemental in its beauty.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Every track on Dongs of Sevotion is chock-full of some of the most poignant, disconcerting lyrics you should ever have to hear.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    An exceedingly triumphant psych-pop oddity.... I doubt 2004 will birth a more blissful sonic encounter than Ta Det Lugnt.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Recalls last year's fine Halo Benders release, The Rebels Not In, the album Martsch recorded with Beat Happening's Calvin Johnson and former Spinanes and current Built to Spill drummer Scott Plouf. And that's not a bad thing at all.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    A matchless combination of scratchy indie rock and post-Oval electronics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    The true beauty of Clinic is that they have, using a relatively standard rock vocabulary, constructed a truly distinctive, energetic, and magnetically appealing sound.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    For its moments of gravity and excellence, Hail to the Thief is an arrow pointing toward the clearly darker, more frenetic territory the band have up to now only poked at curiously.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Van Lear Rose is remarkably bold, celebratory and honest. It's a homecoming for a small-town musician gifted with poise, humor and compassion, but at its very heart, it's happy to be just a kick-ass country record.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    The album's second half is slightly more abstract than the catchy pop that precedes it, but these moments are tempered, causing the record to feel more focused.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    The brilliant In Rainbows represents no such thing [downshift]. Nonetheless, it's a very different kind of Radiohead record. Liberated from their self-imposed pressure to innovate, they sound--for the first time in ages--user-friendly.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    These four discs ultimately do what any good box set should do: In tracing the band's trajectory from power-pop progenitors to post-pop tinkerers, Keep an Eye on the Sky presents a history of the band that could not be gleaned from the albums themselves, using finished studio tracks along with demos and rarities to give a fuller picture of the musicians, their dynamic, and their songs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    This lyrical simplicity shouldn't obscure the fact that these are sharply constructed songs that take unusual turns. One of Girls' specialities is their willingness to go completely over the top but somehow keep us right there with them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Few can match their feel for arrangement or sense of structure.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Mellon Collie is a Smashing Pumpkins record that just so happens to be 28 songs in length, stunning in both its stylistic range and overall excellence.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 93 Critic Score
    Along with the more lived-in sonics, Modern Vampires has the band taking a leap forward into emotional directness. Koenig and Batmanglij truly seem of one mind here, as the vocals and music interact with each other in an effortless flow.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Not only is it the most acoustically enthralling album they've released, it's also without a doubt the most playful, dynamic, and anthemic post-rock album that has been released to date.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    A decade into their career, the Notwist have created a masterpiece by pulling the same trick they pulled on Shrink: mixing things that might not seem to fit together into a beautiful, seamless whole.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Each of these songs displays a mastery of craft rarely heard.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    This record explodes with song after song of endlessly replayable, perfect pop.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    The result is both the best career-spanning snapshot of and single-purchase introduction to Talking Heads-- odd accolades for a live record-- and a treat for longtime fans.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Simply put, this album sounds absolutely huge, its relentless attention to detail eclipsed only by the stunning emotional power it conveys.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    It's a perfect way into the world of Belle and Sebastian, even if the band spends the second half of the disc trying to redecorate that space.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Illinois is huge, a staggering collection of impeccably arranged American tribute songs.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    On paper this all could sound average, but Wolf Parade's true talent is transforming the everyday into the unprecedented.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    As close to a perfect hybrid of dance and rock music's values as you're likely to ever hear.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Nouns is so cacophonous, so fertile, and so ripe with sound that parsing out the samples and effects and various layers of guitar is nearly impossible; besides, it's way more satisfying to just close your eyes and just enjoy it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Yes, this is shit-hot thrilling music. But it's also brainy and ambivalent, and more engaging for it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Here, the band comes into their own by applying their own inspiringly distinctive, bleakly appealing sensibility to whatever ideas happen to move them.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Here, it stands behind so many other newly apparent strengths--a testament to the leaps and bounds Longstreth has made as a songsmith and Dirty Projectors have made as a band.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    You can feel roots going down and an edifice being built. Her voice has gained depth and she sings with more force and clarity, so that's part of it. And the arrangements are more judicious and draw less attention to themselves (some tracks are just harp, others add horns, strings, and percussion, but with a lighter touch). But the bigger difference seems to be the overall mood, which is expansive and welcoming.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Murphy once again shows off his encyclopedic knowledge of all things post-punk and zip-tight. But he's also swimming up some serious stuff himself, including Eno and David Bowie's sacrosanct Berlin trilogy. And against his own prediction, it's far from horrible; it's actually pretty perfect.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    On Sir Lucious Left Foot, Big Boi does something even more difficult: He gives us a great album that sounds nothing like any of the great albums he's already given us. From where I'm sitting, that's an even greater achievement.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    We'll never be able to parse every lyric or tease out every technical intricacy - though somebody will probably try - but that is what Halcyon Digest is all about: nostalgia not for an era, not for antiquated technology, but for a feeling of excitement, of connection, of that dumb obsession that makes life worth living no matter how horrible it gets.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Ram is a domestic-bliss album, one of the weirdest, earthiest, and most honest ever made.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    [Graceland] was unique in its total, and totally natural, synthesis of musical strains that turned out to be not nearly as different from each other as its listeners might have expected, and the result resonated strongly around the world and across generations.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    They've given us something in the present tense that, these days, feels depressingly unfashionable: An Event--an album that dares to be great, and remarkably succeeds.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Benji sounds more like Kozelek relating events instead of crafting them, which makes the continuity and reflexivity of the record feel both uncanny and the work of protracted genius.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    He’s responded in the best way possible: by producing a record that, in structure and scale, is every bit The Seer’s equal, yet possessed by a peculiar energy and spirit that proves all the more alluring in its dark majesty.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin is one of music's most assured and fully realized debuts; individually, Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, and John Bonham were great players, but the whole of their sound somehow exceeded the sum of its parts. But even above the instrumental virtuosity, Led Zeppelin is a triumph of production, each part clear and forceful but adding up to something even more powerful.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 92 Critic Score
    This streamlined set, Start Together, captures that dichotomy, archiving the Sleater-Kinney canon with care: from the ideological-punches of thirdwave feminism to their post-riot grrrl classic rock revisionism, all seven albums have been remastered and paired with a plainly gorgeous hardcover photobook, as well as the surprise of a reunion-launching 7" single.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Some of the most propulsive, ferocious music of the year as well as some of the most poignant.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Without a doubt, this is Les Savy Fav's defining album.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Throughout Cedars, Clearlake continually find beauty in melancholy and melancholy behind beauty, while raising your hairs in reverence with occasional guitar squalls.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Insanely catchy '60s- inspired pop music in addition to sound collages, field recordings, drony ambience, cathartic noise, and outlandish production that makes Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound" look like a cubicle divider.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    One Word Extinguisher shows a range of emotional grappling usually foreign to instrumental hip-hop.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While Quality may lack the basement charms of [departed producer DJ Hi-]Tek's finest, it more than compensates by employing a funkier and more upbeat sound palate to further draw out the nuances of what is already one of the most rounded and complete rap personas in the game.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The Strokes are not deities. Nor are they "brilliant," "awe-inspiring," or "genius." They're a rock band, plain and simple. And if you go into this record expecting nothing more than that, you'll probably be pretty pleased.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Burn, Piano Island, Burn balances so perfectly between commercial appeal and untainted creativity that it's as if the band have been digitally inserted atop a mountain no man could conceivably climb.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    13
    Blur have finally found a sound to match their name.