Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,965 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
6,965 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    You get lost in it, and if you're wired a certain way that mixture of desire and confusion is easy to map on to the wider world. For 22 years, the only way to get there was through Loveless and its associated EPs; now there's another path, one many of us never expected to find.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The Surrey duo have not only made 2013's best dance record so far--they've also concocted one of the most assured, confident debuts from any genre in recent memory.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Fake Train and New Plastic Ideas hold important places in the history of 90s music, not to mention those of punk and indie as a whole. And they set the tone for unimagined Unwound greatness to come (which will be chronicled in subsequent volumes of the box-set series). But those two albums, and the tracks that accompany them on Rat Conspiracy, transcend time, place, attitude, and even the sprawling continuum of influence.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In many respects, Leaves Turn Inside You is the band's most ambitious, sweeping, and difficult outing yet.... I'm convinced that, if you've been following this band's development, the initial bewildered expression on your face will give way to total enchantment, and this new, boldly different Unwound album will have you in its grip for months to come.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Out Hud also back up their flash with remarkable substance, setting their music apart from anything as one-dimensional as standard club offerings or moody trance cuts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Profound, innovative, and absolutely vital.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Each song contains its own small epiphany, but they never quite add up to the one big sweeping epiphany that you'd hope for.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Murray Street is Sonic Youth's first successful convergence of envelope-pushing guitarwork and accessible songery since 1988.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lift Your Skinny Fists like Antennas to Heaven is a massive, achingly beautiful work, alternately elegiac and ferocious. However, Lift plays like an oddly transitional album: much of the first disc presents a refinement of the sound that crystallized on the Slow Riot EP, while the second disc flirts with moments of vertiginous shoegazing, looser rock drumming and reckless crescendos of unalloyed noise. Succinctly, the first disc is easily continuous with their earlier work; the second disc might just be the future.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Quality aside, the questionable sequencing of Amnesiac does little to hush the argument that the record is merely a thinly veiled b-sides compilation...
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An immediately engrossing and challenging collection of moody, evocative songs-- an entire album of "I Want You" and "Watching the Detectives" for those so inclined.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While the rest of pop culture infantilizes itself with cussing puppets and manufactured bands who willfully dangle like marionettes, Waits is serving up vintage brittle fusion and somehow breaking the law of diminishing returns. [Review of both Alice and Blood Money]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While the rest of pop culture infantilizes itself with cussing puppets and manufactured bands who willfully dangle like marionettes, Waits is serving up vintage brittle fusion and somehow breaking the law of diminishing returns. [Review of both Alice and Blood Money]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Oui
    Oui is stunning easy listening in recession, but up close, it's genius. The production, the arrangements, the instrumentation, the electronics would sound cumbersome in the hands of the unexperienced, but the Sea and Cake fuse these elements with economy and care. If Oui doesn't erupt like an outright revolution, it's only because the band makes it look it too easy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    White Blood Cells doesn't veer far from the formula of past White Stripes records; all are tense, sparse and jagged. But it's here that they've finally come into their own, where Jack and Meg White finally seem not only comfortable with the path they've chosen, but practiced, precise and able to convey the deepest sentiment in a single bound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This perceived, grand-scheme "Importance" of Echoes is irrelevant: what matters is that it wants you to get off your ass and work it, and that you will be thrilled to oblige.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Don't just judge it as an album by a band coming off a major line-up change. You won't need to.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The end result is a great album, albeit one more lighthearted than its myth would suggest.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite the new song structures, guitar solos, and drum fills, Brownstein's guitar still roars wildly, Weiss's drums still thunder, and Tucker still wails with a primal urgency that is one of the most compelling sounds in rock music today.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As a career overview Minimum-Maximum far surpasses The Mix. This record's "importance" in the Kraftwerk story is up for debate, but there's no question it's a hell of a lot of fun.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The record is consistently, remarkably strong.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With more developed ideas than Mass Romantic and a more cohesive sound than Electric Version, it's their most consistent, confident, and best album to date.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By turns jubilant, confused, afraid, angry, sad, relieved, all pretty poignant, yes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Feels is an excellent record, one that, despite a more conventional approach, happens to get better over time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Drum's Not Dead is a majestic victory lap, and on all levels, a total fucking triumph.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fishscale reiterates with cinematic verve that the most vital current Wu Tang Clan member's storytelling can match Biggie's in both excitement and humor. Yet Ghost's songs are unrelenting in their slavishness to density and credibility, and that can turn off casual listeners even as it intoxicates hip-hop purists.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even at its most dissonant and abstract, this record is human to the core, and if you're ready to face a few demons, it's as inspiring as music gets.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So This Is Goodbye isn't just an improbable notch above 2004's Last Exit-- it's also among the best records you'll hear all year.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If Willner doesn't hit at least some of your pleasure centers, well, forget your ears-- your nerve endings might actually be dead. Even three months in, it's a safe bet that From Here We Go Sublime will wind up 2007's most luxuriant record.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Along with wry, sometimes melancholic observations worthy of Richman or the Magnetic Fields' Stephin Merritt, these elements make for Lekman's best record, one likely to captivate even those who were skeptical of his previous releases.